Toronto’s Mayor & Police Chief Not Interested in Saving Taxpayer’s Money

Update: see previous post – October 16, 2015 $1.16 Billion Toronto Police Budget Will Continue to Burgeon to 2018

Toronto City Hall. Earlier this year, Tory and the seven-member police board signed off on a contract that gives officers wage increases of 2.75 per cent this year, 1.95 per cent next year, 1.9 per cent in 2017 and 1.75 per cent in 2018. That follows two previous contracts that bumped pay in excess of 20 per cent over seven years.
Last year, 4,125 of the service’s 7,800 uniform and civilian employees earned more than $100,000. That means that 52.88% of the force earned more than $100,000 in 2014. This year’s police budget grew to $1.16 billion. Property taxes collected amount to $957 million. By 2019 most of the force, excluding the civilian employees, will be placed on the Provincial Sunshine List.

see source

KPMG suggests short-term cuts and long-term reform for both TPS and police services board

Policing in Toronto can be delivered in a more “proactive,” “community-centric,” and “sustainable” way for less money, according to a report commissioned by the Toronto Police Services Board and released on Thursday.

But the professional services and auditing firm that wrote the report, KPMG, says long-term reforms are necessary to get the desired savings.

Toronto police meet in front of the Rogers Centre before the opening ceremony for the Pan Am Games in July. Security for the games was budgeted at $64 million.
Mayor John Tory is calling for restraint from all City of Toronto employees. Following this statement, Tory and the seven-member police board signed off on a contract that gives officers wage increases of 2.75 per cent this year, 1.95 per cent next year, 1.9 per cent in 2017 and 1.75 per cent in 2018. That follows two previous contracts that bumped pay in excess of 20 per cent over seven (7) years – an average raise of 2.86% per year, over seven (7) years, which will boost the base salary of a first-class constable to $98,450 by 2018.

The report calls on both the board and the TPS to consider a range of measures in the short, medium and long term to reduce costs and deliver services more efficiently, such as shifting the “staffing mix” toward more civilians and fewer officers, modernizing IT, as well as “further outsourcing all or select components of HR, IT and finance functions.”

In the short term, KPMG is suggesting TPS and the board consider:

  •  a temporary halt to promotions, and overtime pay for officers
  •  a “moratorium” on capital spending and long-term IT projects.

In the medium and long term, the report suggests:

  • consolidation of divisions and establishment of strategic hubs to deploy officers more effectively.
  • a review of “shift scheduling practices to create more organizational flexibility and optimally match officers and staff to demand.”
  • reducing the “number of required vehicles by moving towards a more community-based operating model with more officers out of cars.”

In 2014, 4,125 of the service’s 7,800 uniform and civilian employees earned more than $100,000. That means that 52.88% of the force earned more than $100,000 in 2014. This year’s police budget grew to $1.16 billion. Property taxes collected amount to $957 million. By 2019 most of the force, excluding the civilians, will be placed on the Provincial Sunshine List.

‘Review of the review’

The board commissioned the report for $300,000 back in January 2014, asking KPMG to essentially perform a “review of the review” after Bill Blair presented the results of his Chief’s Internal Organizational Review (CIOR).

Some members of the board expressed concern at the time that the CIOR didn’t go far enough to find the savings the city demanded in 2010, which amounted to a 10 per cent cut in the police budget over four years.

The KPMG report is critical of the CIOR, saying among other things that some of its findings had an “unclear analytical basis,” that “gaps exist in information provided,” that some CIOR projects were “incomplete for unknown reasons,” and that there was an opportunity “for greater identification of cost savings” in the TPS budget.

The controversy over rising policing costs that led in part to the board’s refusal to renew Blair’s contract earlier this year recently came to a head again.

The proposed budget for 2016 presented last month to the board by Blair’s successor, Chief Mark Saunders, tops the $1 billion mark for the first time in TPS history.

But the KPMG report also suggests the board is in need of reform, recommending structural changes to “strengthen governance structure and operations … to enhance Board’s accountability and oversight functions.”

It calls for “a renewed vision and strategic plan which is informed by community priorities and provides a clear roadmap for transformation.”

The report will be presented to the board for consideration at its next meeting on Dec. 17/15.

Update: see agreement, as reflected by the Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Toronto Police Services Board

Location: Toronto, Ontario
Union: Toronto Police Association
Affiliation: Independent-local
Number of employees: 5,650
Bargaining unit: police officers

A 48-month renewal agreement, effective from January 1, 2015 to December 31, 2018, settled in April 2015 at the bargaining stage. Duration of negotiations – 6 months.

Wages

Effective
January 1, 2015
Effective
December 1, 2015
General Adjustments2.00%0.75%
Annual rates
Constable 3rd Class$73,954 [$72,504]$74,509
Constable, 1st Class$92,433 [$90,621]$93,127
Staff Sergeant$116,928 [$114,635]$117,805
Effective
January 1, 2016
Effective
July 1, 2016
General Adjustments1.50%0.45%
Annual rates
Constable 3rd Class$75,626$75,967
Constable, 1st Class$94,524$94,949
Staff Sergeant$119,572$120,110
Effective
January 1, 2017
Effective
July 1, 2017
General Adjustments1.50%0.40%
Annual rates
Constable 3rd Class$77,106$77,415
Constable, 1st Class$96,373$96,759
Staff Sergeant$121,911$122,399
Effective
January 1, 2018
General Adjustments1.75%
Annual rates
Constable 3rd Class$78,769
Constable, 1st Class$98,452
Staff Sergeant$124,541

Classification Adjustments

4th , 3rd, and 2nd Class constables hired after the date of ratification will receive rates as follows:  3rd Class constable will be paid at the rate of the 4th class for the first 2 months; a 2nd Class constable will be paid at the rate of the 3rd Class for the first 4 months and a 1st Class constable will be paid at the rate of the 2nd class for the first 6 months [new addition].

Hours of Work

Office and technical employees who regularly work day shift, 35 hours per week; all other employees, including office and technical employees who regularly work day and afternoon shifts on a rotating basis, 40 hours per week [unchanged].

Paid Holidays

10 designated days plus 1 floating holiday and an addition of 7 or 8 hours, depending on weekly scheduled hours per week in lieu of Family Day for employees [unchanged].

Paid Vacation

2 weeks earned after 1 year, 3 after 3, 4 after 9, 5 after 15, 6 after 21 and 7 after 27 [unchanged].

Health and Welfare

Physiotherapy:  Effective January 1, 2016, $3,000 per year [not available].

Psychological/Family Counselling: Effective January 1, 2016, $3,500 [$2,200] per year.

Sick Pay Gratuity

New employees hired after ratification will no longer receive Sick Pay Gratuity [new addition].

Labour-Management Committees

Compressed Workweek [new addition]:  To be established to look at the uniform agreement workweek and shift schedules.

2-Officer Patrol Cars [new addition]:  To be established to look at a new ratio of 2 officer patrol cars.

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