Toronto: Pothole Repair Blitz Begins On January 13, 2014

Update: see previous posts – April 25, 2011 Toronto’s Potholes, March 21, 2011 Potholes on Toronto’s Streets

40 to 50 crews of pothole repair workers will hit the streets starting on January 13, 2014 to begin filling in potholes with asphalt, as seen above.  It is estimated that there are currently about 4,000 potholes on the city's streets.  The pothole work will continue throughout the week.
40 to 50 crews of pothole repair workers will hit the streets starting on January 13, 2014 to begin filling in potholes with asphalt, as seen above. It is estimated that there are currently about 4,000 potholes on the city’s streets. The pothole work will continue throughout the week.

see source

City crews (40-50) will go out tomorrow with their portable Asphalt truck to repair potholes. City of Toronto crews have already repaired about 4,000 potholes so far this year, compared to about 1,500 at this point last season.

Héctor Moreno, City of Toronto’s Transportation Services Manager (of road operations) reported that 40-50 crews will be sent out on Toronto’s roads to start filling all the potholes, beginning on Monday, January 13, 2014 and continuing the work throughout the week. Moreno said “Whenever we have the January or February thaw the first thing we typically embark on is hitting potholes to try to stay ahead of the game,” “typically we can fix anywhere from 25 to 50 potholes per crew, per day.”

The crews will drive around with small trucks with asphalt cooking the unit they carry. When they reach the pothole that needs to be filled, the crews will exit their trucks and get the shovels out to place the asphalt in the pothole until it is entirely filled.  This is a temporary patchwork solution, until the street can be properly covered with asphalt.

Potholes can cause damage to vehicles and injuries to pedestrians.
Potholes can cause damage to vehicles and injuries to pedestrians.

Anyone that has noticed potholes can report these to the City of Toronto by calling 311. Hector Moreno reports that the City has up to a week to investigate the report and make the necessary repairs, but in most cases, according to Moreno, the potholes are filled within 48 hours of the complaint.

The City takes potholes seriously, given the amount of harm they can do to vehicles that are damaged after running over them.  Motorists who find that their vehicles are damaged can successfully sue the City of Toronto for any damages sustained, as a result of the offending potholes(s).

The City of Toronto takes potholes seriously, as they risk exposure to civil litigation from those claiming damages.
The City of Toronto takes potholes seriously, as they risk exposure to civil litigation from those claiming damages.

What causes potholes in this weather?

Potholes are formed when water penetrates the surface of the tarmac and then freezes, causing cracks to form. Then when the ice thaws, it leaves a gap under the now-weakened tarmac, which eventually collapses.

If your vehicle has come into contact with a pothole in the City of Toronto and has sustained damage and you want to be compensated, you must contact the City Clerk’s Office: By Mail at 100 Queen Street West, 1st Floor North, Toronto, Ontario. M5H 2N2 and by email at [email protected] Make sure that you describe where the pothole was located, date, time and try to take pictures (of the pothole and the damage on your vehicle) and keep all your receipts and estimates for your repairs. Don’t submit an insurance claim (and risk having your premiums increase) when the City of Toronto is responsible for the roads and potholes within their jurisdiction. Upon sending the City Clerk your compensation claim, you should receive an acknowledgement of your claim within ten (10) business days.

There are many ways that motorists or concerned people can contact the City to report a pothole (from the City of Toronto website):

Question

How do I report potholes?

Answer

Call 311 or report online.

Visit toronto.ca/311 for more contact details and self-service options.

Or use an app – http://en.seeclickfix.com/apps, this allows you to open up your app, take a picture of the pothole and then send the photo and description of the pothole:

You’ll be asked for a location (unless your phone/tablet gives your location) and the following (see example):

Q. Describe size and shape of pothole:
A. 4 feet wide 3 feet deep

You’ll then be provided with a “service request ID: #” as given in an example below:

Your service request has been assigned service request ID: #0000002014. Keep this service request ID number, as you’ll be asked for it later.

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