Toronto Police Receive 8.94% Pay Raise Over Four (4) Years

Update: see previous post – November 11, 2015 Ontario Poll Finds Low Support for Boosting Police Spending

Almost 90% of the police budget of $942 million goes to pay for salaries and benefits for police. This does not include paid duty payments. Most Toronto Police earn over $100,000.00 per year now. The Toronto Police Services Board passed a budget over the next four (4) years (2105-18), in which police will receive an 8.35% raise. Mayor Tory who was in attendance, supported the raise and the budget.
Almost 90% of the police budget of $942 million goes to pay for salaries and benefits for police. This does not include paid duty payments. Most Toronto Police earn over $100,000.00 per year now. The Toronto Police Services Board passed a budget over the next four (4) years (2105-18), in which police will receive an 8.35% raise. Mayor Tory who was in attendance, supported the raise and the budget.

see source

Rising salaries are part of the $27 million hike, which still needs approval from city council.

The Toronto Police Services Board has unanimously approved the force’s request for a $27 million, or a 2.76 per cent increase over the 2015 net approved budget.

The increase, if approved by city council, will push the service’s 2016 operating budget to more than $1 billion and was primarily needed to cover the wage settlement included in the most recent collective agreement.

Earlier this year, the board and the Toronto Police Association signed a four-year contract providing a 2.75 wage hike this year, 1.95 per cent next year, 1.9 per cent in 2017 and 1.75 in 2018.

Almost 90 per cent of the budget goes to salaries and benefits.

Mayor John Tory said he, his fellow board members and Chief Mark Saunders are committed to finding ways to constrain future police spending in the future. A $200,000 KPMG report with cost-cutting recommendations is on next month’s board agenda, he said.

“We can’t continue to see significant increases in the police budget indefinitely, so we’re at work on that,” Tory told reporters after the board’s monthly meeting at police headquarters.

Tory said the collective agreement allows for discussions on shift scheduling and the requirement there be two officers in a car after dark, which are embedded in the police contract. Both would be contentious issues over which the TPA has in the past vigorously opposed changes.

A 2011 Ernst & Young efficiency report found that $35 million could be cut from the police budget with a simple shift schedule change. Right now, there are as many officers on duty at 4 a.m. as there are at 7 p.m. “It’s a crazy way to spend money,” said former Toronto mayor John Sewell, who heads a police watchdog group.

Sewell was representing himself when he told the board Thursday the proposed increase is $65 million more than the city wanted to spend next year on the service.

The city had asked for a police budget one per cent less than the 2015 budget, or $942 million.

“I think you should be really upfront about the fact that other departments in the city have to cut and the police service does not. As usual, the police service gets more,” Sewell angrily told the board.

Tory, in response, said that he has not asked any city agency or division to reduce their budgets by two per cent. “They were asked to find two per cent in efficiencies,” Tory said.

Last month, the board asked police budget planners for additional reductions after the service asked for a 3.69 per cent increase.

The service came up with $9.1 million in further reductions to the 2016 operating budget request.

Toronto Police Services Board

Location: Toronto, Ontario
Union: Toronto Police Association
Affiliation: Independent-local
Number of employees: 5,650
Bargaining unit: police officers

A 48-month renewal agreement, effective from January 1, 2015 to December 31, 2018, settled in April 2015 at the bargaining stage. Duration of negotiations – 6 months.

Wages

Effective
January 1, 2015
Effective
December 1, 2015
General Adjustments2.00%0.75%
Annual rates
Constable 3rd Class$73,954 [$72,504]$74,509
Constable, 1st Class$92,433 [$90,621]$93,127
Staff Sergeant$116,928 [$114,635]$117,805
Effective
January 1, 2016
Effective
July 1, 2016
General Adjustments1.50%0.45%
Annual rates
Constable 3rd Class$75,626$75,967
Constable, 1st Class$94,524$94,949
Staff Sergeant$119,572$120,110
Effective
January 1, 2017
Effective
July 1, 2017
General Adjustments1.50%0.40%
Annual rates
Constable 3rd Class$77,106$77,415
Constable, 1st Class$96,373$96,759
Staff Sergeant$121,911$122,399
Effective
January 1, 2018
General Adjustments1.75%
Annual rates
Constable 3rd Class$78,769
Constable, 1st Class$98,452
Staff Sergeant$124,541

Classification Adjustments

4th , 3rd, and 2nd Class constables hired after the date of ratification will receive rates as follows:  3rd Class constable will be paid at the rate of the 4th class for the first 2 months; a 2nd Class constable will be paid at the rate of the 3rd Class for the first 4 months and a 1st Class constable will be paid at the rate of the 2nd class for the first 6 months [new addition].

Hours of Work

Office and technical employees who regularly work day shift, 35 hours per week; all other employees, including office and technical employees who regularly work day and afternoon shifts on a rotating basis, 40 hours per week [unchanged].

Paid Holidays

10 designated days plus 1 floating holiday and an addition of 7 or 8 hours, depending on weekly scheduled hours per week in lieu of Family Day for employees [unchanged].

Paid Vacation

2 weeks earned after 1 year, 3 after 3, 4 after 9, 5 after 15, 6 after 21 and 7 after 27 [unchanged].

Health and Welfare

Physiotherapy:  Effective January 1, 2016, $3,000 per year [not available].

Psychological/Family Counselling: Effective January 1, 2016, $3,500 [$2,200] per year.

Sick Pay Gratuity

New employees hired after ratification will no longer receive Sick Pay Gratuity [new addition].

Labour-Management Committees

Compressed Workweek [new addition]:  To be established to look at the uniform agreement workweek and shift schedules.

2-Officer Patrol Cars [new addition]:  To be established to look at a new ratio of 2 officer patrol cars.

This information is from a posting by Human Resources and Skills Development Canada.

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