Toronto: On-Street Hourly Parking Prices to Increase

Update: see previous post – August 15, 2015 Toronto Parking Authority to Raise Parking Rates

In August, the Toronto Parking Authority (TPA) raised hourly and monthly rates at the parking lots. Now they are recommending raising the on-street parking rates for pay-and-display and on-street parking meters in 9 out of 44 Wards in Toronto.
In August, the Toronto Parking Authority (TPA) raised hourly and monthly rates at the parking lots. Now they are recommending raising the on-street parking rates (from .25 cents to $1) for pay-and-display and on-street parking meters in 9 out of 44 Wards in Toronto.

see source

The Toronto Parking authority voted last month to raise half-hourly rates and monthly rates at fifty (50) different publicly-owned Green “P” parking lots, commencing on August 17 through to October, 2015. Those half hour and monthly parking rates increases didn’t affect the pay-and-display “P” parking or on-street metered parking.

Hourly parking rates will rise by a maximum of $1 in some downtown areas and as little as 25 cents in others.

For example:

  • Downtown, the $4 hourly rate area will be shifted north into an area bordered by Bloor Street, Bay Street Dundas Street and Spadina Avenue. Drivers here currently pay $3 an hour.
  • West of downtown, the $3 hourly rate area will be pushed west along College Street and Dundas Street West to Bathurst Street, where drivers currently pay $2.25 an hour.
  • Rates would jump to $3 an hour from $2.25 on St Clair Avenue West between Yonge Street and Avenue Road.
  • Other areas would see hourly parking jump to $2.25 an hour from $2. These include areas of Dundas Street West, Ossington Avenue and Chinatown and Kensington Market.
  • Drivers in Roncesvalles will see rates climb to $2 an hour from the current rate of $1.50 and along Queen West in Parkdale.

Free parking along certain streets in the evening hours will also end, under proposed changes. The complete list of changes are outlined in this city report.

Now the President of the Toronto Parking Authority, Lorne Persiko is urging Toronto City Council to raise the pay-and-display and on-street metered parking hourly rates, as well as modifying the hours of operation for these parking locations (see Wards 14, 16, 18, 19, 20, 22, 25, 27, 28.). Persiko is only recommending changes in nine (9) out of forty-four (44) wards within Toronto.

The TPA's Pay-and-Display On-Street Parking Machine.
The TPA’s Pay-and-Display On-Street Parking Machine.

Since the Toronto Parking Authority (TPA) took over all of Toronto’s public parking after the 1998 almalgamation, they have conducted two comprehensive parking reviews. In 2012, the City instructed the TPA to undertake a comprehensive review of hourly rates and hours of operation at on-street parking locations operated by way of pay-and-display parking machines on a three year cycle. This would be the third major review, with the next one (the fourth review) expected in 2018.

Mr. Lorne Persiko, President of the Toronto Parking Authority (TPA).
Mr. Lorne Persiko, President of the Toronto Parking Authority (TPA).

Adjustments to the hourly rate structure implemented as a result of the 2012 City Council decision, which were based on Consumer Price Index (CPI) since 2007.

Since the last increases in 2012, the TPA has increased the average paid parking rate by 11%.

In order to accomodate the changes that TPA’s Persiko is requesting, City Council would have to amend the City of Toronto Municipal Code, Chapter 910, Parking MachinesSchedule I and the City of Toronto Municipal Code, Chapter 910 Parking Machines and Parking Meters, Schedule III, Parking Meters.

These increases and changes to on-street parking are suppose to be in line with and reflect underlining changes to the Consumer Price Index overall, since the last increases and changes that were implemented in 2012.

Seventy-five (75%) percent of the net income generated by the TPA is transferred to the City of Toronto, with the remaining twenty-five (25%) percent retained by the TPA to fund its capital development program.
 
Financial Impact
These changes, if fully implemented, will generate approximately $1,500,000 in annual gross revenue and partially compensate for the overall decline in on-street parking revenue. The Authority will incur costs of $100,000 to implement the changes.

Hourly Rate Boundary Changes

Expand the $4.00 Hourly Rate Area northwards into parts of the current $3.00 hourly rate area. This adjustment addresses the high demand for parking, particularly in the Discovery District. In addition, further adjustments to the hourly operations on Sundays to start earlier in the day are proposed for the area.
Expand the $3.00 Hourly Rate Area westwards into parts of the $2.25 hourly rate area. This adjustment will extend the $3.00 per hour rate along Dundas St. W. and College St. W., from Spadina Ave. to Bathurst St., in order to address the high demand for parking with the increasing commercial activity westwards of the downtown. These parking spaces are currently set with a rate of $2.25 per hour.
Similar adjustments were made in 2012 along King St. W. and Queen St. W. and these changes have been successful at addressing changing parking demand.
Hourly Rate Changes from $2.25 to $3.00 per hour. Areas include:
• St. Clair Ave. W. (between Yonge St. and Avenue Rd.)
• Uptown Yonge St. Corridor. (from an area north of Merton St. to an area south of
Deloraine Rd.,)
These changes apply higher hourly rates to high demand commercial areas, to be
consistent with hourly rates charged in other Centres.
Hourly Rate Changes from $2.00 to $2.25 per hour. Areas include:
• Dundas St. W. (between Ossington Ave. and Shaw St.)
• Ossington Ave. (between Dundas St. W. and Queen St. W.)
• Queen St. W. (between Ossington Ave. and Dufferin St.)
• Chinatown – Kensington Area (south of the University of Toronto). The adjustment is
in line with the neighbouring $2.25 rate located immediately south of the area. The
rate change is needed to harmonize the hourly rates and address parking pressures in the area.
Hourly Rate Changes from $1.50 to $2.00 per hour. Areas include:
• Queen St. W. (between Roncesvalles Ave. and Gwynne Ave.)
• Roncesvalles Ave. (between Dundas St. W. and Queen St. W.) The rate change addresses the continued emergence of West Queen West, Parkdale and
Roncesvalles as high intensity retail areas and applies an hourly rate already in effect in similar areas of the City of Toronto. Hours of Operation Changes Extended Hours of Operation on Queen St. W., King St. W., and Ossington Ave.

Hours of Operation Changes

Extended Hours of Operation on Queen St. W., King St. W., and Ossington Ave. Extending the payment periods in certain areas of the City is needed to promote turnover in areas that attract large amounts of late evening activity and hence, on-street parking at night. Extended hours are currently in effect in the Entertainment District and in Yorkville. The following areas are being proposed for extended hours:
• King St. W, between University Ave. and Bathurst St.
• Queen St. W, between University Ave. and Ossington Ave.
• Ossington Ave., between Dundas St. W. and Queen St. W. (also with a proposed rate increase from $2.00 to $2.25 per hour)
Sunday Hours starting at 10 a.m. Where Sunday charging is in effect, the required payment (with limited exceptions) begin at 1 p.m. Sunday hours for parking are being proposed to start at 10 a.m. in select institutional locations to capture the increasing morning demand for parking on Sundays. Areas include:
• The Discovery District (from current Sunday start times of 1 p.m. to 10 a.m.).
• Yorkville (from current Sunday start time of 1p.m. to 10 a.m.).
Uptown Yonge St. Corridor changes in hours of operation and hourly rates. The area along the Uptown Yonge St. Corridor and its accompanying flankage streets, from an area north of Merton St. to an area south of Deloraine Rd., experiencing an increasing demand for parking in evenings. Further to the proposed increase in the rate from $2.25 to $3.00 per hour, extending the payment period from 9 p.m. to 10 p.m., similar to the changes to the North York Centre implemented in the 2012 rate review, are being proposed.
Miscellaneous Hours of Operation Changes. Areas include:
• Church St., between Alexander St. and Bloor St. E., changes to capture unpaid
parking during the morning (east-side only).
• Bloor St. E., between Sherbourne St. and Parliament St. (south-side only).
The solar power cell used to power Toronto Parking Authority (TPA)'s pay-and-display machines. The TPA manages an estimated 19,000 on-street parking spaces. The TPA utilizes leading technology in an environmentally responsible manner in its operations. As an example, the TPA has been using solar powered pay-and-display units since 1999, making it one of the first uses of photovoltaic technology by the City.
The solar power cell used to power Toronto Parking Authority (TPA)’s pay-and-display machines (and yes, they even work in the rain). The TPA manages an estimated 19,000 on-street parking spaces. The TPA utilizes leading technology in an environmentally responsible manner in its operations.
As an example, the TPA has been using solar powered pay-and-display units since 1999, making it one of the first uses of photovoltaic technology by the City.
On-Street Parking
The TPA manages an estimated 19,000 on-street parking spaces. The TPA
utilizes leading technology in an environmentally responsible manner in its operations.
As an example, the TPA has been using solar powered pay-and-display units since
1999, making it one of the first uses of photovoltaic technology by the City. Currently, 17,600 of on-street spaces are operated using 2,700 of these efficient and
economical pay-and-display machines, with the remaining spaces managed by single spaced meters.
Off-Street Parking
The TPA maintains approximately 21,500 off-street spaces in 203 facilities, which include 11 attended lots, 13 fully automated garages, and 179 unattended lots.
Additionally, the TPA is contracted to operate 13,800 spaces at Toronto Transit Commission park-and-ride facilities and parking lots, and 1,100 spaces in Toronto Community Housing Corporation parking lots. The TPA also supports the management of parking lots for the Parks, Forestry, and Recreation Division, and 2,175 parking spaces in facilities along the waterfront and other areas in Toronto
on a seasonal basis.
Structure
Under the City of Toronto Act, the Toronto Parking Authority is a City board and the City has full authority over its structure and mandate.
The TPA is governed by the Toronto Municipal Code, Chapter 179, “Parking Authority”. The Toronto Parking Authority Board of Directors consists of seven voting
members and one non-voting member:
  • Five Citizens (Voting);
  • Two Council Members (Voting); and
  • The City’s General Manager of Transportation Services, or designate (non-voting).
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