Toronto: Gov’t. Management Committee Votes to Instruct Police to Stop Ticketing Motorists Who Fall Within 10 Minute Grace Period

Update: see previous post – February 211, 2013 – Toronto: The Fixer – Councillors Want Cops to Extend 10-Minute Grace Period for Overtime Parking

Despite the fact that the City of Toronto passed an amendment back in July, 2012, which extended the 5 minute grace period to a 10 minute grace period with regard to paid parking (which amended the Parking Ticket Cancellation Guidelines) Parking Enforcement Officers and police, continue to issue tickets to motorists within 10 minutes of the expiration period of the paid parking tag.  This forces the motorist to make a trip to request that their ticket be cancelled under the Parking Ticket Cancellation Guidelines.  City councillors will deal with this issue on Monday, April 8, 2013 and will pass a resolution which instructs the Toronto Police Services Board (employer of Toronto Parking Enforcement Officers and Toronto Police) to stop issuing tickets to motorists who have paid for parking and where the parking tag purchased has expired within 10 minutes of the paid time.
Despite the fact that the City of Toronto passed an amendment back in July, 2012, which extended the 5 minute grace period to a 10 minute grace period with regard to paid parking (which amended the Parking Ticket Cancellation Guidelines) Parking Enforcement Officers and police, continue to issue tickets to motorists within 10 minutes of the expiration period of the paid parking tag. This forces the motorist to make a trip to request that their ticket be cancelled under the Parking Ticket Cancellation Guidelines. City councillors will deal with this issue on Monday, April 8, 2013 and will pass a resolution which instructs the Toronto Police Services Board (employer of Toronto Parking Enforcement Officers and Toronto Police) to stop issuing tickets to motorists who have paid for parking and where the parking tag purchased has expired within 10 minutes of the paid time.

see source

Council is poised to tell the city’s Blue Hornets not to sting Toronto drivers with parking tickets unless more than 10 minutes pass following expiry of their paid tickets.

In a surprise move Monday, April 8, 2013  the government management committee voted to ask Toronto Police Services Board to order the parking enforcement unit not to issue parking tickets to drivers until 10 minutes after their paid parking has expired on city streets. If the change goes through, city municipal law enforcement officers would also be ordered not to issue parking tickets until after the 10-minute grace period has expired.

The move – which has to be approved by city council – would end the bizarre situation whereby the city will cancel a parking ticket if you get it within 10 minutes of your paid parking expiring. But the city doesn’t stop the Toronto Police parking enforcement unit from issuing the ticket within the grace period in the first place.

Committee chair Paul Ainslie moved the parking-ticket quick-fix Monday.

A handheld computer and handhled parking ticket printer; tools of the trade for Toronto Police Services Board employees Parking Enforcement Officers
A handheld computer and handhled parking ticket printer; tools of the trade for Toronto Police Services Board employees Parking Enforcement Officers

“I think it is widely accepted out there, it is at least widely understood, that people have a 10-minute grace period,” Ainslie said. “I think it is taking up a lot of time, money and effort of our staff in dealing with this and I think it needs to be understood by the Toronto Police department as well.”

Last year, council voted to give drivers a 10-minute grace period, rather than a five-minute grace period, for parking tickets in a bid to reduce court costs. So far, city staff say “99% of the time” the ticket gets cancelled if it is within the 10-minute grace period.

Councillor Mary Fragedakis questioned why the grace period wasn’t automatic.

“If it is a grace period, it is a grace period,” Fragedakis said.

Councillor Doug Ford said city staff can’t be “judge and jury.”

“We should have a pretty steadfast rule on that one,” he said.

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