Toronto: Community Groups to Challenge the Constitutionality of Toronto Police “Carding” Citizens

Update: see previous posts – April 26, 2013 Toronto: Police To Issue “Contact Receipts” When They Stop and Question Citizens Beginning in July, 2013, January 23, 2013 Toronto Police: Does Carding and Issuing Receipts Violate Charter and Human Rights Legislation?, November 15, 2012 Toronto Police Rename Practice of “Carding” into “Street Checks” – Board Reviews Receipts

Police will begin to provide these receipts in July 2013 when they pull people over and begin to ask them questions.

Police will begin to provide these receipts in July 2013 when they stop people and begin to ask them questions (intelligence gathering) and then record all of that information into their data system.  The Law Union of Ontario calls this practice of “carding” or as police now call it “street checks”, illegal, violating the Charter of Rights and Freedoms and the Human Rights Code. Community activists and lawyers are moving ahead with plans to launch a Charter challenge as well as a class action lawsuit to try to stop the controversial Toronto police practice known as carding.

see source

Community activists and lawyers are moving ahead with plans to launch a Charter challenge as well as a class action lawsuit to try to stop the controversial Toronto police practice known as “carding.”

The group has been meeting since a Toronto Star investigation published last year showed that officers stop and document — or card — black and brown people at disproportionately high rates.

The series led to criticism of the practice by activists such as the Canadian Civil Liberties Association, the Law Union of Ontario and the Toronto Police Accountability Coalition led by former mayor John Sewell.

If anyone feels that government or different arms of the government are abusing the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, they can challenge the Charter breach in the courts.
If anyone feels that government or different arms of the government are abusing the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, they can challenge the Charter breach in the courts.

The Toronto Police Service maintains that carding is legal. The police board has asked the city’s auditor general to conduct an independent review of the data kept by police, who record race along with other personal information when they stop and document an individual. But that review, as well as a legal opinion from the city, are months away.

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