Toronto: City Repairs 10,000 Fewer Potholes This Year

Update: see previous posts – March 14, 2016 Ottawa: Pothole Damage Claims Rarely Paid Out by City, April 3, 2014 Toronto: City Spends Extra $4 million on Pothole Repairs, January 15, 2014 Potholes: Professor Comes Up With Indestructible Pure Asphalt

City of Toronto Road operations manager Hector Moreno says the city has had to fix 10,000 less pot holes compared to this time last year.

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The City of Toronto says they’ve filled fewer potholes this year thanks to mild weather

The early signs of spring are starting to show and for drivers and cyclists alike, that means potholes.

The street craters are virtually impossible to prevent, but thanks to a mild winter, the City of Toronto says it’s seen a significant drop in the number of potholes its had to fill, compared to this time last year.

City road operations manager Hector Moreno says the city has had to fill roughly 34,000 potholes so far this year, which is around 10,000 less than it had repaired by mid-March of last year.

Moreno says the mild weather this past winter has made for fewer potholes on city roads. They typically form as asphalt expands and contracts during wet weather and changing temperatures.

“That sort of movement back and forth puts a lot of pressure on the pavement and eventually the pavement tends to buckle,” Moreno says.

Pothole repair

The city has had to fill roughly 34,000 potholes so far this year. That’s roughly 10,000 less than it had repaired by mid-March of last year. (Paul Borkwood/CBC News)

On average, the road operations manager says the city fixes about 200,000 potholes each year at a cost of about $3.8 million. He says that’s about 18 to 22 dollars per pothole, depending on the size.

“The highest figures that we repaired potholes was in 2014 and that was for obvious reasons,” Moreno says. “We had a very cold winter, plus we had multiple freeze-thaw cycles and so we had a lot of breaking in the pavement.”

The city repaired roughly 365,000 potholes that year at a cost of about $5.8 million.

With fewer potholes to repair this year, Moreno says the city has been able to get a head start on focusing crews on other spring clean-up initiatives.

Still, the city is asking anyone who comes across potholes on Toronto streets to report them. You can call 311 or report potholes online.

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