Reciprocal Agreements: Between the Province of Ontario and other Provinces/Territories and Different U.S. States

Update:

See the new page, featured as the third page in the Law section

Many Canadians and residents of the Province of Ontario do not realize that Ontario, along with other Provinces/Territories and U.S. States have Reciprocal Agreements that allow the sharing and possession of driver’s licence and driver records (within their respective Provinces, Territories or U.S. States) to be exchanged.

In 1960, the United States of America created and developed the “Driver Licence Compact”.  The idea behind the creation of this compact, was for individual States to share and exchange information with respect to traffic violations and driver licence suspensions of driver’s licensed in other States, to that driver’s home State.  The objective behind this was to have one driver’s licence and one driver’s record.  The home State, upon receiving information from another State, with regard to a driver’s traffic violation conviction or a conviction which led to the suspension of the driver’s licence, would apply the motor vehicle laws of the home State, towards that infraction, depending on the driving laws of that particular home State. The home State, upon receiving the information of a conviction in another State, could impose a wide range of penalties, from demerit points, to a fine or even a suspension, depending on the severity of the offence.

Soon the U.S. came up with the Non-Resident Violator Compact, which was replaced with the Driver Licence Agreement.  Now the U.S. has the Interstate Driver Licence Compact, which 45 States participate in.

Canada and Ontario, about thirty years later, began to have their own Reciprocal Agreements.  In 1989, Ontario and Quebec entered into a special agreement, to share information about driver’s who were licenced in Ontario and were convicted of traffic violations in Quebec and visa versa.

In 1990, the Canadian Driver Licence Compact was developed and had most Provinces and a Territory agreeing to share information.  As a result of a change in Article 5 of the compact in 2003,  those who participated in the compact, were now obligated to send unpaid fine information to the home Province or Territory of a that particular licenced driver, if a non-resident received a ticket in their jurisdiction (in another Province or Territory) and neglected to pay the fine.  The overall objective behind these agreements which spanned the entire country, was to develop one driver licence, one driver’s record.  Over time, there will be one North American Driver’s Licence, which will envelop anyone who wants to be licenced to drive in Canada or the U.S.A.

In addition to this agreement, Ontario signed off special agreements with the State of New York and the State of Michigan. Some of these come into being in May, 2009.  These agreements fall under section 198 (1) of the Highway Traffic Act.

In addition to these agreements, there are others between Ontario and the following 41 U.S. States:

Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Idaho, Illonois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvannia, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, West Virgina, Wisconsin, Wyoming and District of Columbia.

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58 comments

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  2. I AM A LICENSED DRIVER IN FLORIDA USA
    I HAVE A PENDING DUI CASE COMING TO TRIAL IN Hamilton ONT IN FEB OF 2014
    MY QUESTIONS ARE
    IN THE EVENT OF A CONVICTION DOES THIS AFFECT MY DRIVING PRIVILAGES IN FLORIDA
    DOES THIS AFFECT MY DRIVING PRIVILAGES IN OTHER US STATES
    IN OTHER WORDS ARE THE DRIVING RESTRICTIONS REPORTED TO RECIPROCAL STATES
    IF SO WHICH ARE THESE STATES THAT WILL ENFORCE ANY SUSPENSION THAT MAY BE PUT ON ME IN ONTARIO

  3. Greetings.. do parking tickets received in new jersey have any affect on an ontario car if unpaid?

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  6. Hi Kris:
    Unfortunately, convictions for highway traffic convictions follow you in Canada. Two convictions of minor offences will lead to an increase in your insurance premiums and generally remains for five (5) years, for the purposes of your insurance record.

    Remember to http://fightyourtickets.ca

  7. Greetings,

    I’m a soon-to-be truck driver residing in southern Ontario. Currently, I have 3 tickets showing in my abstract. 2 pending court dates.. Needless to say, all these tickets will screw me out of a good chunk of driver jobs in Ontario. My question is, if I move to another province, will my abstract remain the same? Is there any Canadian province that I could move to where my driving record would look better than it does here in Ontario? I have no demerit points, they’re all minor offenses but they’re still tickets and they still affect my insurance, thus affecting my employment opportunities as a truck driver.

    Look forward to hear back from you

  8. Hi Jim:
    Illinois has a reciprocal agreement with Ontario and they take any DUI charge extremely seriously, given that it is a criminal charge in Illinois.

    Here is a recent article that you should read with respect to the attitude of Illinois lawmakers towards DUI and related charges: Illinois Drugged Driving Law: Unbending and Complex @ http://www.24-7pressrelease.com/press-release/illinois-drugged-driving-law-unbending-and-complex-210069.php

    If you are convicted in Illinois, then the conviction would apply to your Ontario driver’s licence and if a conviction results in a suspension of your driver’s licence in Illinois, then that suspension would apply to your Ontario held driver’s licence.

    Given the seriousness and the resulting ramifications that may result from this serious criminal charge, you are advised to seek legal counsel in Illinois as soon as possible.

    Remember to always http://fightyourtickets.ca

  9. I have an Onatrio DL and recieved a DUI in the state of Illinois. If I pay the fines. Will the DUI appear on my Onatario Driving record

  10. Hi Kathy:
    Ontario has a reciprocal agreement with New York. You have mailed in your ticket but your message
    wasn’t clear as to what choice you made with your ticket.

    If you are convicted in New York, that conviction will be applied to your Ontario driver’s licence.

    If you travel 21 – 30 MPH over the posted speed limit, you will receive 6 demerit points.

    Two of these speeding convictions within an 18 month period, will result in the suspension
    of your driver’s licence – see http://www.nydmv.state.ny.us/license.htm#points

    Remember to always http://fightyourtickets.ca

  11. Hello,
    I was in Rochester, New York and received a speeding ticket, I can’t remember how much, but it was approximately 25 miles over. When I got the ticket, it looked like a fax sheet with a lot of information on it. There was no fine stated on the ticket and the officer explained that I have the choice to plead not guilty and attend a hearing or plead not guilty and mail it in to receive the fine. I mailed it in shortly after coming back to Toronto but I HAVE NOT received anything from them with regards to a fine. This was back in March (2-3). I mailed it to the address on the ticket which was somewhere in Rochester.

    I’m nervous because I have to travel back to Rochester for work (again) on Thursday April 28th and I’m not sure what will happen when I get to the border. I don’t want to drive all the way there and be turned away or detained and not let in. Unfortunately, my record keeping isn’t as organized as I thought and I can’t for the life of me find the photocopy I made of the ticket.

    Your advice will be greatly appreciated!
    Thank-you,
    Kathy

  12. Hi Scott:

    You don’t have to worry about getting arrested if you cross the border and travel within Ontario. Just to be clear, there is no provision under the Ontario Highway Traffic Act for arresting people and incarcerating them over an unpaid speeding ticket or unpaid parking ticket.

    Although the Province of Ontario and the State of Michigan have a reciprocal agreement in this area, if you haven’t heard anything, don’t push it. Let sleeping dogs lie.

    You can access the database maintained by the Secretary of State (which contains driving licence information on 7 million drivers in Michigan) to find out the status of your driving record.

    Ontario’s Highway Traffic Act is different than Michigan’s Vehicle Code and when we fight a speeding ticket in Ontario, we travel to the Ontario Court of Justice, whereas in Michigan, traffic violations are handled in District Court, of which there are 100 across the state. Most tickets will be resolved in a District Court’s Traffic Division.

    You didn’t mention the speed that the Province alleged that you were travelling, but in Michigan, different levels of points are given to different levels of speeding:

    * Four points

    * Drag racing.

    * Operating while visibly impaired.

    * Under age 21 with any measurable blood alcohol content.

    * 16 mph or more over the legal speed limit.

    * Failure to yield or show due caution for emergency vehicles.

    * Three points

    * Careless driving.

    * Disobeying a traffic signal or stop sign or improper passing.

    * 11-15 mph over the legal speed limit.

    * Failure to stop at railroad crossing.

    * Failure to stop for a school bus, or disobeying a school crossing guard.

    Remember, always http://fightyourtickets.ca

  13. I am a resident of Michigan and I was traveling through Ontario and received a speeding ticket. I returned to MI and never paid it. It’s been about 4 years now and have never received anything in the mail about it. Can I return to Ontario or will I be arrested when I get to the border?

  14. Hi Malik:
    No, that isn’t true. If your Ontario Driver’s Licence is suspended, the suspension would be in place and affect your ability to drive in Canada and most of the U.S. States.

    You don’t want to even attempt to drive a motor vehicle while your licence is under suspension given the serious consequences that will most certainly be applied if it comes to the attention of law enforcement and your auto insurance company.

    I would advise that you refrain from driving during the period of suspension and wait until your driving privileges are returned, before getting behind the steering wheel again.

    Remember to alway http://fightyourtickets.ca

  15. I Have an Ontario Driver’s license & i am under suspension until the month of September, I heard that when you’re driver’s license is suspended in Ontario it is ONLY a province wide suspension, is this true?
    & Am I allowed to drive in other provinces or states?????

  16. Hi Roy:

    The speeding ticket that you received, alleges that you were travelling 87 mph in a 65 mph zone = 22 mph over that speed limt. (this is 6 points in New York upon conviction).

    Ontario and New York State do have a reciprocal agreement with each other and as such, a conviction in the New York State or a driver’s licence suspension will impact on your licence in Ontario. If as a result of your actions in New York, your driver’s licence is suspended, the same would follow in Ontario.

    State or local governments may increase the statutory speed limits, decrease the statutory speed limits, or set minimum speed limits on roads under their jurisdiction.

    In general, states may also establish different highway speed limits for different types of vehicles, at different times of the day, for various weather conditions, or for other factors bearing on safe speeds. Uniform Vehicle Code §11-803. For example, posted speed limits that designate a speed different than the speed provided by the statutory speed law are frequently found on state highways, on residential streets, in school zones, and in business districts. Posted speed limits that vary from the statutory speed limit are also used to designated maximum speeds at certain times.

    If you don’t show up for your scheduled court date and you are deemed as not to have appeared, your licence can be suspended. You can have a representative show up on your behalf.

    IF YOU ARE ISSUED A TICKET

    Don’t delay! Follow the instructions on the ticket for the plea you wish to make, and act promptly.

    If you don’t answer the ticket in the time allowed, your driver license will be suspended. Later, you could be found guilty of the charge because of your failure to respond (a default conviction). Your license would be suspended for not paying the fine and a judgment would be entered against you.

    Driving with a suspended license is a crime. A felony conviction may result in fines of up to $5,000, jail, probation, or confiscation of your vehicle. As the number of suspensions you have increases, the penalties also increase. A driver is suspended for each ticket not answered and each fine not paid.

    To Plead Not Guilty – Read the “not guilty” instructions and check the “not guilty” box on the back of the ticket. Fill in the requested information, sign it, and, within 15 days of the recorded violation date, mail the ticket to the Albany address listed. DMV will send you a letter telling you when and where to go for your hearing. If you are hearing impaired and require an interpreter, include a request for one when you mail your not guilty plea. An interpreter will be assigned to your hearing at no charge to you.

    ATTEND YOUR HEARING

    Hearings are open to the public. You may go to any TVB office to watch hearings so you know what to expect at yours.

    To Plead Guilty – Read the instructions and check the “guilty” box on the back of the ticket. Fill in the requested information, sign it and, within 15 days, either mail it with your payment to the Albany address listed on the ticket or bring your payment to any TVB office. You may pay the fine and surcharge by Visa or Mastercard, or by a check or money order payable to the Commissioner of Motor Vehicles. Include the total fines and surcharges listed on the ticket for your violation(s).

    You may not plead guilty by mail if the charge against you will result in license or registration suspension or revocation upon conviction (such as driving without insurance or a third speeding violation within 18 months). If you plead guilty to such a charge by mail, you will be notified that you must go to the TVB to answer the charge in person.

    Your Address – If your mailing address is different from the address written on the front of the ticket, please write the correct mailing address in the space provided on the back of the ticket.

    TO POSTPONE YOUR HEARING

    You may request your traffic ticket hearing to be postponed and rescheduled to a different date. For the ticket’s first postponement, the appropriate TVB must receive your request by mail at least 10 days before the date of the scheduled hearing. You may also make your postponement request in person at that office or by telephone at least one day before your hearing date. If it would be a second or subsequent postponement for the same ticket, your request must be made in person at the appropriate TVB office at least one day before your hearing date. Your request for a second or subsequent postponement also must include a “good cause,” which is the reason you want the hearing rescheduled. Your “good cause” is subject to approval by a TVB Administrative Law Judge.

    For a traffic ticket issued within New York City: Mail your request to the Albany, NY, address on your ticket – the office must receive your request at least ten days before the date of your scheduled hearing. You also may make your request in person at any TVB office in New York City, or telephone the TVB at (718)-488-5710, at least one day before the date of your scheduled hearing.

    For a traffic ticket to be answered to a TVB outside New York City: Mail your request to the TVB office indicated on your ticket. The office must receive your request at least ten days before the scheduled hearing date. You also may make your request in person to that TVB office or by telephone at least one day before the date of your scheduled hearing

    WHAT HAPPENS AT YOUR HEARING

    You are considered innocent of the charge against you unless you are proven guilty at your hearing. You cannot be found guilty unless there is “clear and convincing evidence” that you committed the violation.

    If you find it hard to understand English, you may bring someone to help you. Tell the ALJ, before the hearing starts, that someone who speaks your native language and English is there to interpret.

    The ALJ will listen to sworn testimony from the police officer, who will explain why you were given the ticket. Then, you or your attorney may ask the officer questions. You also may bring witnesses to testify for you and written evidence. The judge may ask witnesses questions to better understand their testimony.

    You do not have to testify but you may if you wish. You cannot be found guilty just because you do not testify.

    When all on the evidence and testimony have been given, the ALJ will decide whether or not you are guilty. That decision will be based only on the evidence and testimony presented at the hearing and what the law states. If the ALJ decides the charge against you was not proven by clear and convincing evidence, you will be found not guilty. If the charge is proven and you are found guilty, the judge will set a fine. Your license or registration also may be suspended or revoked, depending on the violation and your overall driving record.

    APPEALS

    If you believe the ALJ’s decision was incorrect based on the facts and the law, you may file an appeal. You can determine if you can file an appeal on-line or download form AA-33 (Traffic Violations Bureau Appeal form) from the DMV web site. The appeal form is also available at TVB offices. Read the instructions carefully. If you wish, your attorney may help you file the appeal. Remember to include a payment for the appeal fees. An appeal must be filed within 30 days of the decision, and the appeal form and fees must be sent to:

    Appeals Processing Unit
    DMV
    P.O. Box 2935
    Albany, N.Y. 12220-0935

    A conviction of travelling 22 mph over the posted speed limit in New York will attract 6 points.

    DMV Point System Summary

    The following table shows the point values assigned to moving traffic violations. The “points” are assessed against your driving record based on the date you committed the violation, not the date you were convicted in court. If you accumulate 11 or more points in 18 months, you will be called to a DMV hearing, after which your license may be suspended or revoked. You will be offered the option of waiving the hearing or accepting a definite period of suspension.

    Some license revocations and suspensions are mandatory and do not depend on points. These include three speeding violations within 18 months, and convictions involving alcohol or drugs.

    For more information about license suspensions and revocations, please refer to the publication “Suppose Your License Were Taken Away” (C-12), available at any motor vehicle office.
    VIOLATIONS POINTS
    Speeding (mph over posted limit)
    1 to 10 3
    11 to 20 4
    21 to 30 6
    31 to 40 8
    More than 40 11
    Reckless Driving 5
    Failure to stop for a School Bus 5
    Following too closely (tailgating) 4
    Inadequate Brakes 4
    (while driving employer’s vehicle) 2
    Failing to Yield Right-Of-Way 3
    Violation Involving Traffic Signal, Stop Sign, or Yield Sign 3
    Railroad Crossing Violation 3
    Improper Passing or Lane Use 3
    Leaving scene of an incident involving property damage or injury to an animal 3
    Safety restraint violation involving person under 16 3
    Any other moving violation 2

  17. I am an ontario driver and received a speeding ticket in the town of Sullivan, New york State , no fine was give but date to appear in court or plead guilty. I was doing 87 in 65 zone .what is the fine and would any demirit points be given and transfered to my ontario licence?

  18. Hi David:
    It wouldn’t appear on your licence, given that there is no reciprocal agreement. Even if a reciprocal agreement was subsequently signed off, it would not be retroactive and therefore would not apply to your specific situation.

    Remember to http://fightyourtickets.ca

  19. Thanks Admin. If I were to just pay the fine, what is the likelihood that it would appear in my Ontario driving record in the future if there becomes a reciprocal agreement between Ontario and State of Georgia?

  20. Hi David:
    Subsection 198 (1) of the Ontario Highway Traffic Act extends to and applies to judgments rendered and become final against residents by any court of competent jurisdiction in the following 41 States (Georgia is not one of those States that have a reciprocal agreement with Ontario):
    1. Alabama
    2. Arizona
    3. Arkansas
    4. Colorado
    5. Connecticut
    6. Delaware
    7. Idaho
    8. Illinois
    9. Indiana
    10. Iowa
    11. Kansas
    12. Kentucky
    13. Louisiana
    14. Maryland
    15. Michigan
    16. Minnesota
    17. Mississippi
    18. Missouri
    19. Montana
    20. Nebraska
    21. New Hampshire
    22. New Jersey
    23. New Mexico
    24. New York
    25. North Carolina
    26. North Dakota
    27. Ohio
    28. Oklahoma
    29. Oregon
    30. Pennsylvania
    31. Rhode Island
    32. South Carolina
    33. Tennessee
    34. Texas
    35. Utah
    36. Virginia
    37. Washington
    38. West Virginia
    39. Wisconsin
    40. Wyoming
    41. District of Columbia

    If Georgia was one of those States with a reciprocal agreement with Ontario and points had to be assessed, based on your speed of 17 mph over the posted
    speed limit of 70 mph – you would receive or accrue three (3) demerit points on your Ontario’s driver’s licence with the Ministry of Transportation. According to Ontario’s Highway Traffic Act (see Ontario’s Regulation 339/94) exceeding the speed limit by 16 to 29 km per hour – Section 128 (c) of the H.T.A. would mean that three (3) demerit points would be placed on your driving record with the Ministry of Transportation. If there was a reciprocal agreement between the Province of Ontario and the State of Georgia and the infraction that you received in Georgia resulted in a driver’s licence suspension, your driver’s licence in Ontario would be suspended.

    In the State of Georgia the following applies with respect to the rules of the road:

    Mandatory Suspension

    The Department shall suspend a license for a conviction of any of the following offenses in Georgia or any other state:

    1. Homicide by vehicle.
    2. A conviction for driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs.
    3. Any felony in the commission of which a motor vehicle is used.
    4. Using a motor vehicle in fleeing or attempting to elude an officer.
    5. Fraudulent or fictitious use of, or application for a license.
    6. Hit and run or leaving the scene of an accident.
    7. Racing.
    8. If you refuse to take a chemical test for intoxication, then your license will be suspended for 12 months.
    9. Operating a motor vehicle with a revoked, canceled, or suspended registration in violation of Code Section 40-6-15.
    10. Conviction for driving without insurance is a 60/90-day suspension.
    11. If convicted for driving while license is suspended, revoked or canceled, your driver’s license will be further suspended for six months.
    12. If you fail to appear in court or respond to a citation, your license may be suspended indefinitely.
    13. Your driver’s license will be suspended if you are convicted of possession, distribution, manufacture, cultivation, sale or transfer of a controlled substance or marijuana.
    14. The Department is authorized to suspend your license if its records or other evidence shows that you have accumulated 15 points within 24 months under the point system, including violations committed out of state.

    Points are accumulated for:
    Reckless Driving 4 points
    Unlawful passing school bus 6 points
    Improper passing on hill or curve 4 points

    Speeding
    15 mph but less than 19 mph – 2 points
    19 mph but less than 24 mph – 3 points
    24 mph but less than 34 mph – 4 points
    34 mph or more – 6 points
    Disobedience of any traffic-control device or traffic officer 3 points
    Possessing an open container of an alcoholic beverage while driving 2 points
    Failure to adequately secure a load 2 points
    All other moving violations 3 points
    Child restraint – 1st offense 1 point
    Child restraint – 2nd and subsequent offense 2 points
    Aggressive driving
    (A conviction of aggressive driving by a person under 21 years
    of age will result in a suspension of the driver’s license.) 6 points
    HOV lane violation – 4th and subsequent offense. 1 point

    If I were you I would either fight the ticket or would pay the fine. Remember to always http://fightyourtickets.ca

  21. Hi, I am an Ontario driver and received a Citation in the State of Georgia for going 87 in a 70 zone. Since there is no reciprocal agreement between Ontario and Georgia, what should I do?

  22. Hi Jonah:
    You should attend, given the seriousness of this offence and the potential consequences if you do not attend.
    Driving over 55 mph, depending on where you have driven in excess of 55 mph is normally an offence that carries with it, three (3) points upon conviction.
    Failure to Appear and/or to Pay a Fine
    Your driving privilege will be revoked when the DMV receives notification from the court that you have failed to appear in court or to pay fines for a citation you received in North
    Carolina or another state. In the case of failure to appear and/or to pay a fine, your driving privileges remain revoked until the DMV receives notice that you have complied with
    the citation. Complying with the citation does not relieve you of the consequences for the actual offense, if you are convicted.
    Suspensions and Revocations
    In addition to criminal penalties that the court might mandate, conviction of certain traffic offenses will result in the loss of your driving privilege.
    Your driving privilege will be revoked for at least 30 days if you are convicted of:
    • Driving any vehicle more than 15 miles per hour over the speed limit, if you are driving at a speed higher than 55 mph.

  23. Hi, I live in Ontario and was pulled over by a NC trooper, he says I was doing 72 in a 55 zone, there is no $ amount only a date to attend court, Mar 30, 2011. Do I have to attend or can I get someone in NC to represent me?

  24. Hi Paul:
    If you have an expired driver’s licence from any state or province, it cannot be exchanged for any Canadian licence.

  25. Hi, I have a question:

    Can I exchange my Wisconsin Driver License which has expired in 2008 for any Canadian Driver License?

    thanks for answer

  26. Hi Paul:
    Currently there is no reciprocal agreement between the State of Florida and the Province of Ontario. Ontario does have reciprocal agreements with a number of U.S. States, but the State of Florida isn’t one of them. See: http://www.canlii.org/en/on/laws/regu/rro-1990-reg-607/latest/rro-1990-reg-607.html

    I can understand how you received a ticket in the mail to your address if you were pulled over and you provided all of your information to an officer, but if you didn’t get pulled over, how did they discover your address, simply from your Ontario licence plate?

    Here is Florida’s Driving Violations and Related Points received upon conviction:
    Driving Violations and Points

    Speeding
    Less than 15 mph over the speed limit —3 points
    More than 15 mph over the speed limit—-4 points
    Speeding resulting in an crash——6 points

    Moving Violation
    Moving violation (includes driving during restricted hours and parking on a highway outside the limits of a municipality)—3 points
    Moving violation resulting in a crash—-4 points
    Failing to stop at a traffic signal (effective October 1, 2005)—-4 points
    Passing a stopped school bus—-4 points
    Reckless driving—-4 points
    Leaving the scene of a crash resulting in property damage of more than $50——6 points
    Improper lane change—3 points
    Violation of a traffic control sign/device—-4 points
    Open container as an operator—3 points
    Child restraint violation—3 points

    Littering—3 points

    If you receive 6 points on your driving record within a 12 month period, your driving privileges are automatically restricted to business purposes only for 12 months – see: http://www.flhsmv.gov/ddl/teendriv.html#points

    This can be found on the Florida website:

    How do I clear a suspension for failure to comply with traffic summons, to appear on a traffic summons or to pay fine?

    Driver license is suspended indefinitely. Contact the traffic court in the county where the traffic summons was issued, satisfy the traffic summons and present proof of the satisfaction plus a D6 suspension reinstatement fee in any Florida driver license office. Some traffic courts allow payment for the traffic summons online via credit card. Check the traffic court web site to determine if you can pay yours now.

    Out-of-state residents must send the satisfaction and a D6 suspension reinstatement fee and a letter of residency to:

    The Bureau of Driver Improvement
    P.O. Box 5775
    Tallahassee, Florida 32314-5775
    Make Check Payable to the Division of Driver Licenses

    A clearance letter will be mailed to you. If inquiring about an out-of-state traffic summons on the Florida driver record, contact the court that has jurisdiction. If more ticket information is needed, contact the Bureau of Customer Services at (850) 617-2000.

    How do I clear unpaid tickets?

    Tickets must be paid in the traffic court in the county in which the citation was issued. Some traffic courts allow payment online via credit card. Check the traffic court web site to determine if you can pay yours now. See the following link: http://www.flhsmv.gov/ddl/faqsuspend.html

    You would have to start by looking at the Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles website located at http://www.flhsmv.gov/
    Ontario has reciprocal agreements with 41 U.S. States, but Florida is not one of them. Therefore you should be able to go to Florida and the information located on your Ontario driver’s licence/licence plate should not be available to the Florida Motor Vehicle branch.

    The Florida Motor Vehicle branch consider Canadian citizens as non-immigrants and are able to easily get a Florida driver’s licence.

    The Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles requires any part-time or seasonal resident ( ie-snowbirds ) living in Florida in excess of 90
    calender days (this includes the total number of days during 12 months in that year) during the year to obtain a Florida personal injury and property
    damage liability auto insurance. This is the minimum insurance Florida motorist must have in order to drive a vehicle in the State of Florida, but given
    that you are a Canadian, you should probably purchase more than the required minimum.

    If you are planning on keeping your motor vehicle in the State of Florida for less than 90 days within the year, then the auto insurance you already
    have in Ontario, should cover you, while you are in Florida and you would not require additional auto insurance from an insurance company in Florida.

    Remember to always http://fightyourtickets.ca

  27. Amazing. Thank you so much! I really have no problem paying any of the tickets if I get them. Spain’s highways have constantly-changing speed limits, and o tried my best to stay within them, but they were unpredictable and difficult to know what speed to go sometimes.

    Anyway, I really only care about it affecting my insurance, so thank you so so so much for putting me at ease here.

    Jesse

  28. Hi Jesse:
    Most rental car companies require you to sign a contract before they allow you to drive away in their 30 thousand dollar vehicles.

    One of the clauses that are inserted in the contract deals with traffic/parking tickets. It normally says that you are responsible for any tickets received or for any damage that the vehicle sustains while it is in your possession. Normally renters are offered waivers on damage, if they purchase abnormally high insurance policies on the vehicle.

    These vehicle rental companies are normally careful when it comes to the language of their contracts and insert a clause, that they insist you must agree to and sign, which gives them the right to deduct monies from your credit card, if later on they find (after being notified) that you have received a ticket that the owner of the vehicle must pay for and be legally and financially responsible for.

    Since the rental company is the owner of the vehicle and you agreed to be responsible for any costs for tickets received while the vehicle was under your care, custody and control and in your possession, once they receive a “speed camera” ticket and the fine associated with this offence, they will simply pass it on to you and automatically deduct it from the credit card that you used to rent their vehicle.

    Spain doesn’t need to craft a reciprocal agreement with Ontario to cover this situation, as it comes down to simple contract law (between the rental car company and yourself).

    This will not affect your Ontario driver’s licence or your Ontario auto insurance.

    Remember to always http://fightyourtickets.ca

  29. This is a great thread…I have a question for you.

    I am from ontario and was driving in Spain in a rental car, where there were lots of speed cameras. I am not sure if I got caught by one, but there is a chance that I did. As far as I can tell, Spain does not have a reciprocal agreement with Canada, so if I get a ticket in the mail, then I don’t have to worry about it affecting my insurance, right? I had given the rental agency my license and international driving permit information.

    Also, I see a lot of talk on here about not paying the fines because there is no reciprocal agreement. I want to pay the fines if I get a ticket, just to be safe. If I pay the fines, will it still not affect my insurance or Ontario driving record?

    Thanks a lot

  30. After getting back to Ontario from my Christmas holiday in Florida I received a traffic violation in the mail. The photos included on the ticket show my vehicle not coming to a complete stop while turning right at a red light (at least this is how I interpret the photos). The fine is reasonably hefty.

    What are the implications of not paying? The licensing bureau in Ontario seems to be telling me that it would not affect renewing my plates. If it meant that I couldn’t return to Florida I think I could live with that (after this episode). I’m mostly concerned that it could affect me crossing the U.S. border anywhere, which would be bad.

  31. Hi Max:
    There is a reciprocal suspension of driver’s licence agreement between Ontario and Pennsylvania – see: http://www.canlii.org/en/on/laws/regu/rro-1990-reg-607/latest/rro-1990-reg-607.html . This means any suspension that you suffer in Ontario, will be applied to your Pennsylvania driver’s licence.

    This means that if are convicted of impaired driving in Ontario and your driver’s licence is suspended, then that information is conveyed to the State of Pennsylvania’s Department of Transportation see: http://www.dmv.state.pa.us/new_residents/driver_license.shtml

    You should carefully read this document, as it relates to Pennsylvania’s policy regarding Chapter 15 – Licensing of Driver’s see: http://www.dmv.state.pa.us/pdotforms/vehicle_code/chapter15.pdf

    The conviction in Ontario, especially for something considered as serious as your charge, will certainly count against your driver’s licence in Pennsylvania and the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation will suspend your driver’s licence in Pennsylvania and this will have an immediate effect on your auto insurance in Ontario or Pennsylvania.

    Under the circumstances, you are advised to challenge your DUI ticket in Ontario and do the very best that you can, considering the long term consequences (with respect to your auto insurance and driver’s licence – both in Ontario and Pennsylvania). If you choose not to attend your trial, you will be convicted in absentia and will be subject to the punishment/fines that the Court determines to be appropriate. If you show up you may be able to mitigate the consequences and have some control over the outcome, if you don’t bother showing up, you have no control over the outcome and will have little, or no sympathy or understanding from the Court.

    By showing up you may be able to negotiate a much better deal for yourself and will have some control on the outcome of the proceeding.

    Remember to always http://fightyourtickets.ca

  32. Hi Max:
    There is a reciprocal suspension of driver’s licence agreement between Ontario and Pennsylvania – see: http://www.canlii.org/en/on/laws/regu/rro-1990-reg-607/latest/rro-1990-reg-607.html

    This means that if are convicted of impaired driving in Ontario and your driver’s licence is suspended, then that information is conveyed to the State of Pennsylvania’s Department of Transportation see: http://www.dmv.state.pa.us/new_residents/driver_license.shtml

    You should carefully read this document, as it relates to Pennsylvania’s policy regarding Chapter 15 – Licensing of Driver’s see: http://www.dmv.state.pa.us/pdotforms/vehicle_code/chapter15.pdf

    The conviction in Ontario, especially for something considered as serious as your charge, will certainly count against your driver’s licence in Pennsylvania and the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation will suspend your driver’s licence in Pennsylvania and this will have an immediate effect on your auto insurance in Ontario or Pennsylvania.

    Under the circumstances, you are advised to challenge your DUI ticket in Ontario and do the very best that you can, considering the long term consequences (with respect to your auto insurance and driver’s licence – both in Ontario and Pennsylvania). If you choose not to attend your trial, you will be convicted in absentia and will be subject to the punishment/fines that the Court determines to be appropriate. If you show up you may be able to mitigate the consequences and have some control over the outcome, if you don’t bother showing up, you have no control over the outcome and will have little, or no sympathy or understanding from the Court.

    By showing up you may be able to negotiate a much better deal for yourself and will have some control on the outcome of the proceeding.

    Remember to always http://fightyourtickets.ca

  33. I recieved a DUI in Toronto.
    I live in PA.
    I haven’t gone to court as yet. Will PA find out about this offense and suspend my license?

  34. Hi Mike:
    Yes it will. Any conviction on record with the Ministry of Transportation in Ontario will remain on your driver’s abstract for a period of 3 years from the date of the offence.

    British Columbia will have access to this information upon your arrival and given the seriousness of this charge, it may adversely affect your auto insurance rates when presented to ICBC. You’ll have to apply for your B.C. driver’s licence within 90 days of moving there.

    This may prove to be a helpful link: http://icbc.com/licensing/

    Remember to always http://fightyourtickets.ca

  35. Hello,
    I had a careless driving charge in province of ontario. My licence was suspended for 1 year. I need to to pay a $1500 fine to get my licence back in march. I am wondering, since i am moving to British Columbia in february, will that fine show up in the computer when I ask for my licence back.
    thank you so much for the info

  36. Hi Jane:
    Speeding (MPH over speed limit):
    1 – 10 MPH 3
    11 – 20 MPH 4 Points
    21 – 30 MPH 6
    31 – 40 MPH 8
    More than 40 MPH 11

    This is how it looks at the other end:

    If I get a ticket for a moving violation in another state, do I receive points on my NYS driver license?

    Answer: The NYSDMV does not record out-of-state violations committed by NYS drivers in other jurisdictions. The exceptions are alcohol-related violations, drug-related violations, and moving violations committed in Quebec or Ontario. Under special agreements, traffic convictions in Quebec or Ontario are recorded on NYS driver license records and carry points. Except for violations in Ontario and Quebec, points are not added to your NYS record for out-of-state violations.

    If you do not respond to a ticket or fail to pay a fine for a moving violation that you committed in any state except Alaska, California, Michigan, Montana, Oregon or Wisconsin, the DMV suspends your NYS driver license until you respond to the ticket or pay the fine. If a driver from a state except these six states fails to respond to a traffic ticket issued in NYS, their driver license will be suspended until the driver responds to the traffic ticket in NYS.

    Drivers from other states must contact the DMV in their home state to get information about the effect of a traffic violation conviction that occurs in NYS.

    If you receive a conviction for an alcohol-related or drug-related driving violation in any state, your NYS driver license is revoked for at least six months.

    Remember the reciprocal agreement with Ontario. Anything that happens in New York (a conviction for a moving violation) will be recorded on your Ontario Driver’s Licence with the Ministry of Transportation (and will remain there for two (2) years).

    Remember to always http://fightyourtickets.ca

  37. Hello, I was travelling to NY from Toronto earlier this week and I got a ticket for 17mph over the speed limit. It doesn’t state the fine on it. 1) How much do you think it is going to be and 2) will there be any demerit points attached.. 3)if yes, then how any points will get transferred to ontario license.

    I got the ticket near the town of stanford NY.

    Thanks in advance

  38. Hi HM: with regad to this parking ticket, the City of New York has the following link informing motorists and pedestrians about tickets, see: http://www.nyc.gov/html/dof/html/parking/park_tickets_violations.shtml

    You have waited five (5) days to deal with this ticket and should immediately follow the instructions on the back of the ticket, with respect to the steps you have to take to contest this ticket (especially if you had already paid). New York City parking tickets are not dealt with by the New York DMV – see: How to Dispute a Parking Ticket – http://www.nyc.gov/html/dof/html/parking/park_tickets_dispute.shtml

    New York City actually allows you to dispute a ticket by web. See the following: Welcome to NYCServ, your New York City “e-Service”, “hearing by web”, and information center- see the following link: http://nycserv.nyc.gov/NYCServWeb/NYCSERVMain

    Don’t delay in this matter, as there are strict time limits that you must abide by, if you attempt to deal with your ticket outside of those mandatory time limits, then you will lose ability to dispute this ticket.

    Good luck and always remember to http://fightyourtickets.ca

  39. Hi Admin
    I am a Canadian Citizen travelling NY last week. I received a parking ticket on September 15, 2010 in NYC. I did pay by the Parking Meter and there was no Regulatory sign of “No Parking”. The charge mentioned in the ticket is “no parking for comm. use”.
    Could you please advise how to contest this ticket

    Thanks

  40. Hi Josh: It is difficult to answer your questions, given that you have left out alot of details.
    You didn’t indicate when you received your Ontario Driver’s Licence or when you
    lived in Maryland or when you received your speeding ticket in Ontario or when
    you were convicted of speeding or when your Ontario Driver’s licence expires or
    what kind of driver’s licence you have.

    Section 128 of the Ontario Highway Traffic Act deals with the act of speeding in
    your motor vehicle. If you were travelling 40 km/h in a posted speed limit and
    are convicted of same, the Ministry of Transportation will apply four (4) demerit
    points to your licence. These accumulated points will remain on your driver’s licence
    for two (2) years from the day, month and year that the speeding took place, not
    the date that you were convicted of same. You would have received a fine of $7.00
    per each of the 40 kilometres, and you would also have to pay the court cost ($5.00)
    and the victim fine surcharge on top (this would amount to $280 + $5 + $60).

    If you exceeded he speed limit by 30-49 kilometres over the posted speed limit (see section 128 (b) of the Ontario Highway Traffic Act – the “HTA”) and would be charged for $7.00 per kilometre (see section 128 (14) (c) of the HTA). If you were speeding in a “construction zone” (see section 128 (14.1) (c) of the HTA) then the $7.00 fine would double and become $14.00 per kilometre driven in excess of the posted speed limit.

    You didn’t indicate when you applied for and received your Maryland driver’s licence.

    I don’t understand why the OPP officer would have taken your driver’s licence as a
    result of your speeding violation.

    Several Canadian Provinces and several U.S. States have a reciprocal agreement
    where they share information concerning the suspension of driver’s licences. The
    Province of Ontario has a Reciprocal Agreement with the State of Maryland and the
    State of New Jersey.

    Ontario’s Ministry of Transportation would share information with the State of
    Maryland’s Department of Transportation Motor Vehicle Administration (see link:
    http://www.mva.maryland.gov/ ) and the State of New Jersey’s Motor Vehicle
    Commission (see link: http://www.state.nj.us/mvc/ ). This was process and
    procedure was agreed upon by the Province of Ontario and the States of Maryland
    and New Jersey in the Reciprocal Suspension of Licences, R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 607
    (see link: http://www.canlii.org/en/on/laws/regu/rro-1990-reg-607/latest/rro-1990-reg-607.html

    For more indepth information review the following pages:
    1 http://fightyourtickets.ca/law/reciprocal-agreements-between-the-province-of-ontario-and-other-provincesterritories-and-different-states/
    2 http://fightyourtickets.ca/reciprocal-agreements-between-the-province-of-ontario-and-other-provincesterritories-and-different-us-states/
    3 http://fightyourtickets.ca/reciprocal-agreements/

    Don’t worry about your Maryland or New Jersey driver licenses, they’ll be fine.

    Remember to always http://fightyourtickets.ca

  41. Hi Admin,

    I’m a Canadian citizen living in the US as a student. I lived in Maryland and have a MD license. I was driving in Ontario and received a speeding ticket for 40 kl over (120 in an 80 zone). I’m moved to NJ but have not switched my license over yet. The OPP officer took away my Ontario driver’s license. Will this show up on my MD or NJ drivers license? Is there away I can get my Ontario license back? and How many points will i loose in Ont/MD/NJ???

    Thank you,
    Josh

  42. Hi Imran:

    This is information from the New York Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV):
    Traffic Tickets
    What must I do if I receive a traffic ticket in NYS?

    The back of your traffic ticket contains information on how to answer the ticket. You must respond to the ticket to prevent a suspension of your driver license or driving privileges. It is a crime to drive with a suspended or revoked license.

    Note: You can answer most DMV Traffic Violations Bureau (TVB) traffic tickets on-line. Even if the ticket does not include information about on-line pleas, you can attempt to enter a plea on-line as explained below.

    Local courts handle traffic tickets for moving violations in most parts of New York State. The DMV Traffic Violations Bureau (TVB) only handles non-criminal moving violations that occur in:

    * the five boroughs of New York City,
    * the cities of Buffalo and Rochester, and
    * portions of the towns of Babylon, Brookhaven, Huntington, Islip and Smithtown in Suffolk County.

    The local criminal courts in these areas handle criminal traffic violations, like DWI or reckless driving. For information about criminal traffic violations, contact the local criminal court.

    You can pay fines and surcharges that are payable to a TVB with a Visa card, MasterCard, American Express card or Discover Card.

    DMV Traffic Violations Bureaus:

    See the DMV brochure, Traffic Violations Bureau, for complete information about the TVB.

    For most TVB traffic tickets, you can plead to the TVB ticket on-line. You can then either schedule a hearing for the traffic ticket, or you can pay with your credit card for the fines, and the fees, and the surcharges for the ticket. See the information about how to plead on-line to TVB traffic tickets. You cannot plead on-line to traffic tickets that must be answered in a local court.

    If you must respond to the ticket at a TVB office, follow the instructions on the ticket.

    You can also contact a TVB office listed on the DMV Offices page or one of the following offices:
    To pay by mail:

    Plea Unit
    P.O. Box 2950 – ESP
    Albany, NY 12220-0950 You can also contact:

    Albany Traffic Violations Division
    Rm. 313
    6 Empire State Plaza
    Albany, NY 12228
    (518) 474-0941
    (If you visit, go to the Customer Service Counter in Room 136.) New York City area:

    Traffic Violations Bureau
    Call Center
    1-718-488-5710

    Bring proof of identity (for example, your driver license) when you visit a TVB office.

    Start by reviewing the back of your ticket for trial options. (see: http://www.nydmv.state.ny.us/dmvfaqs.htm )

    It is important to realize that Ontario and New York have a reciprocal agreement and if you are convicted in New York and accumulate demerit points as a result, that information will be relayed to the Ministry of Transportation in Ontario and it will affect your Ontario Driver’s Licence and your demerit points (which will remain on your Ontario Driver’s Licence for two (2) years).

    Your should realize that the way that speeding laws work in Ontario, are much different than the way they work in New York State.

    You were travelling 21 mph over the posted speed limit in New York. Upon conviction in New York this means that if you speed 11-20 mph over the speed limit, upon conviction you will accumulate 4 demerit points. You should reference the New York website at http://www.nysdmv.com/license.htm#points and see the chart which the New York DMV has posted.

    You have to fight this one, given the consequences of just letting it go. Remember to always http://fightyourtickets.ca

  43. Hi,

    I was recently served a Uniform Traffic Ticket (“UTT”) in New York state for speeding (i.e. driving 86mph in a 65mph zone).

    Along with the ticket, I was provided a supporting Deposition which is a form of suppoting evidence from the officer stating the charge/violation (1180D) and the discussion between him and I when he pulled me over.

    Q1 – Can I plead NOT GUILTY? or must I mail in the ticket with a Plea of Guilty (since a supporting Deposition was provided)?

    Q2 – I know that being 21mph over is approx. 33kmh over which could result in 4 Demerit Points in Ontario. Is it possible for me to plea Not Guilty and then try a plea bargain to lower the charge to being over by less than 10mph and thus, not be subject to demerit points and only paying a fine?

  44. Hi Vijay: Here is the link to the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation’s webpage concerning points: http://www.dmv.state.pa.us/pdotforms/fact_sheets/pub472.pdf (See Vehicle Code: 3362 – halfway down the second page) It states that any driver convicted of travelling 6-10 mph over the speed limit will accumulate 2 points upon conviction.

    Demerit Points for Out-of-Province/Country Convictions

    Ontario Drivers convicted of a driving related offence (ie – speeding) in the State of New York or the State of Michigan or any Canadian province or Territory, will have home jurisdictional penalties such as demerit points and/or suspensions applied to their Ontario driver record (Department of Transportation) for two year, as if the offence occurred in Ontario. See: http://www.mto.gov.on.ca/english/dandv/driver/demerit.shtml

    Subsection 198 (1) of the Ontario Highway Traffic Act extends to and applies to judgments rendered and become final against residents by any court of competent jurisdiction in the following Provinces and States:

    Canada:

    Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, Quebec and Saskatchewan.

    United States of America:

    Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Idaho, Illonois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennesse, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, West Virgina, Wisconsin, Wyoming and District of Columbia.

  45. Hi,
    Iam an Ontario resident and received a speeding ticket in PA for travellin 71 on 65 MPH. Although the citation does not indicate of any points, will this information get relayed to Ontario and eventually to Canadian Insuarance companies? I am more concerned about rising insurance premiums.
    Response is much apppreciated.

  46. I pled guilty to an offence in New York State for DWAI (Driving While Ability Impaired (.05 – .07) in violation of VTL 1192.1 which states:

    ” 1. Driving while ability impaired. No person shall operate a
    motor vehicle while the person’s ability to operate such motor vehicle
    is impaired by the consumption of alcohol.”
    The sanctions for driving while impaired are outlined in VTL 1193.1 as follows:

    § 1193. Sanctions. 1. Criminal penalties. (a) Driving while ability
    impaired. A violation of subdivision one of section jail for not
    more than fifteen days, or by both such fine and imprisonment.eleven
    hundred ninety-two of this article shall be a traffic infraction and shall be
    punishable by a fine of not less than three hundred dollars nor more
    than five hundred dollars or by imprisonment in a penitentiary or countyor county
    jail for not more than fifteen days, or by both such fine and
    imprisonment. I was convicted of a traffic infraction sometimes refrred to as a violation which is not a crime in the state of New York. A speeding ticket is also a traffic infraction.

    I received a $400.00 fine and a 90 day suspension from driving in New York. I was just served notice by the Ministry of Transport Ontario that my driver’s license in Onatrio is suspended for 1 year,; I must take an alcohol assessment and install an ignition device. In ontario .05 to .07 woudl have resulted in a 3 day suspension but because the offence I pled guilty to is named in the reciprocal agreement the Province of Ontario has iniitated this action. I have retained a law firm to challenge the MTO decision. If anyone else out there in a similar situation reads this and wants to join the fight let me hear from you.

  47. I got a parking ticket ($250 for parking in a fire lane) in Toronto but I have Quebec plates.

    Will they come after me for the payment if I choose not to pay?

    Does the Toronto Parking Authority have a deal with Quebec’s Ministry of Transportation?

  48. Hi Melissa: You would have to start by looking at the Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles website located at http://www.flhsmv.gov/
    Ontario has reciprocal agreements with 41 U.S. States, but Florida is not one of them. Therefore you should be able to go to Florida and apply for a
    driver’s licence and the information located on your Ontario driver’s licence should not be available to the Florida Motor Vehicle branch.

    The Florida Motor Vehicle branch consider Canadian citizens as non-immigrants and are able to easily get a Florida driver’s licence.

    The Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles requires any part-time or seasonal resident ( ie-snowbirds ) living in Florida in excess of 90
    calender days (this includes the total number of days during 12 months in that year) during the year to obtain a Florida personal injury and property
    damage liability auto insurance. This is the minimum insurance Florida motorist must have in order to drive a vehicle in the State of Florida, but given
    that you are a Canadian, you should probably purchase more than the required minimum.

    If you are planning on keeping your motor vehicle in the State of Florida for less than 90 days within the year, then the auto insurance you already
    have in Ontario, should cover you, while you are in Florida and you would not require additional auto insurance from an insurance company in Florida.

    Remember to always http://fightyourtickets.ca

  49. Can you tell me if I have a suspended drivers license in Ontario for a DUI, am I able to obtain a Florida drivers license to use while I am in florida for the winter?

    Thank you

  50. I received a speeding ticket in West Virginia in march. They have sent me a “notice to suspend driver’s licenese” pursuant to west virginia code-CH 17b, article 3, section 3a. Is there a reciproical agreement between Ontario, Cananda and this state?
    Thank you

  51. There are no current reciprocal agreements between the Province of Ontario and the State of Florida. The answer is no, the information arising from the conviction in Ontario will not be shared with the authorities in Florida. Please keep in mind, impaired driving is a “criminal offence” under Canada’s Criminal Code and is treated accordingly.

  52. If convicted of impaired driving in Ontario, will my licence be suspended to drive in my home state of Florida.

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