Quebec: Considers Increasing Penalty to 4 Demerit Points for Motorists Texting While Driving

Update: see previous posts – March 14, 2014 Ontario: Distracted Driving – When Can I Legally Pull Over to Answer a Text or Phone Call?, February 26, 2014 – Ontario: Chief Justice Increases Distracted Driving Fines to $280 on March 18, 2014, November 6, 2013 Ontario: Driver’s Talking/Texting Deadlier Than Impaired Drivers, October 24, 2013 Ontario: Liberals Will Increase Sanctions (Demerit Points) Against Driver’s On Their Cells, October 4, 2013 Guelph: Court Rulings Mean Police Will Ticket When Motorist Simply Hold Their Phone, September 27, 2013 Ontario: Highest Court of Ontario Rules Simply “Holding” a Cellphone in Vehicle is Sufficient to Convict, August 16, 2013 Toronto: Motorists Using Phones to Talk,Text,Email Four Years After Law Prohibing It

Former police officer, now Quebec Transport Minister, Robert Poeti is considering tougher sanctions against drivers who are caught texting, including hitting them with four (4) demerit points. Currently, Quebec motorists caught texting can lose three points and be fined up to $100. Statistics provided by the insurance board suggest drivers in Nova Scotia faced the stiffest possible fines in Canada. As of last April, those caught texting and driving in that province face fines that run between $225 and $520, although no demerit points are involved. In Saskatchewan, motorists can lose four points in addition to a $280 fine. Currently the sanction for distracted driving in Ontario is a $280.00 fine, although the Ontario government will be introducing a law increasing the fine to a range between $280 to $1000 and three (3) demerit points.
Former police officer, now Quebec Transport Minister, Robert Poeti is considering tougher sanctions against drivers who are caught texting, including hitting them with four (4) demerit points. Currently, Quebec motorists caught texting can lose three points and be fined up to $100. Statistics provided by the insurance board suggest drivers in Nova Scotia faced the stiffest possible fines in Canada. As of last April, those caught texting and driving in that province face fines that run between $225 and $520, although no demerit points are involved. In Saskatchewan, motorists can lose four points in addition to a $280 fine. Currently the sanction for distracted driving in Ontario is a $280.00 fine, although the Ontario government will be introducing a law increasing the fine to a range between $280 to $1000 and three (3) demerit points.

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Quebec Transport Minister Robert Poeti is considering tougher sanctions against drivers who are caught texting, including hitting them with four demerit points.

Currently, Quebec motorists caught texting can lose three points and be fined up to $100.

Poeti said Wednesday it is difficult to assess the extent of the problem but added that many accidents are caused by motorists using their smartphones while at the wheel.

While it has been illegal since July 1, 2008, to drive in Quebec while holding a cellular phone, the number of motorists who have been nabbed doing so has climbed to 66,089 in 2013 from 11,485 for the last six months of 2008.

A survey conducted for the province’s automobile insurance board in November 2013 suggested that 19 per cent of Quebec motorists who have a cellphone used it to text while driving.

Poeti told a news conference in Quebec City that it’s time for action after various awareness campaigns.

The Quebec highway safety code prohibits all drivers except emergency responders from using a hand-held cellphone at the wheel for any purpose. The law calls for a penalty of three demerits and a fine of $80 to $100. According to the Canadian Automobile Association website, texting drivers in Quebec can actually face a fine of up to $154. The law also bans any portable display screens that may distract a driver, except for GPS navigation tools. Quebec now wants to increase the sanction from 3 demerit points to 4 demerit points.
The Quebec highway safety code prohibits all drivers except emergency responders from using a hand-held cellphone at the wheel for any purpose. The law calls for a penalty of three demerits and a fine of $80 to $100. According to the Canadian Automobile Association website, texting drivers in Quebec can actually face a fine of up to $154. The law also bans any portable display screens that may distract a driver, except for GPS navigation tools. Quebec now wants to increase the sanction from 3 demerit points to 4 demerit points.

“When the regulations first came in for cellphones, smartphones, messaging wasn’t what it is today,” Poeti, a former provincial police officer, said Wednesday.

“We couldn’t predict what was going to happen. But there’s no way of getting around the fact it’s become a real problem in Quebec.”

Statistics provided by the insurance board suggest drivers in Nova Scotia faced the stiffest possible fines in Canada. As of last April, those caught texting and driving in that province face fines that run between $225 and $520, although no demerit points are involved.

In Saskatchewan, motorists can lose four points in addition to a $280 fine.

Poeti said he has already held discussions with the insurance board about increasing the number of demerit points to four so “people really understand it is a matter of safety.”

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