Premier Kathleen Wynne Introduces Photo-Radar into Ontario Communities

Update:

Ontario Premier Wynn has renamed Photo Radar (as Automated speed enforcement or(ASE) technology) which will now be introduced on municipal roads, which takes pictures of speeders' licence plates and is already used in many parts of North America and Europe, and for community safety zones and school zones. photo by fightyourtickets.ca
Ontario Premier Wynne has renamed Photo Radar (as Automated speed enforcement or(ASE) technology) which will now be introduced on municipal roads, which take pictures of speeders’ licence plates in Ontario’s community safety zones and school zones. The legislation that she will pass, will allow municipalities to lower default speed limits from 50 km/h down to 40 or even 30 km/h. photo by fightyourtickets.ca.

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Red Light Camera at the intersection of Gerrard Street West and University Avenue
Wynn has committed to streamline the process for Ontario cities to introduce red light cameras at every intersection in every municipality. photo by fightyourtickets.ca

Ontario intends to introduce legislation that would target unsafe drivers and help protect school children, seniors, other pedestrians and cyclists.

Premier Wynn will allow cities to install photo radar in any community safety zone or school zone. photo by fightyourtickets.ca
Premier Wynn will allow cities to install photo radar in any community safety zone or school zone. photo by fightyourtickets.ca

Premier Kathleen Wynne was in Ottawa today to announce intended legislation that, if passed, would give municipalities more tools to improve safety in community safety zones and school zones.

These measures would include:

  • Automated speed enforcement (ASE) technology on municipal roads, which takes pictures of speeders’ licence plates and is already used in many parts of North America and Europe, and for community safety zones and school zones
  • The ability to create zones with reduced speed limits to decrease the severity of pedestrian-vehicle collisions in urban areas
  • A streamlined process for municipalities to participate in Ontario’s Red Light Camera program without the need for lengthy regulatory approval.

    If you are convicted of speeding in a community safety zone, the fine that must be paid, is doubled. photo by fightyourtickets.ca
    If you are convicted of speeding in a community safety zone, the fine that must be paid, is doubled. photo by fightyourtickets.ca.

 

Ontario has heard from municipalities seeking to improve safety in their communities in the wake of collisions involving children, seniors, other pedestrians and cyclists, and is proposing these changes as a result.

Making roads safer for cyclists and pedestrians of all ages by giving municipalities options to enforce traffic laws is part of Ontario’s plan to create jobs, grow our economy and help people in their everyday lives.

 

 

 

 

Quick Facts:

  • Speed is one of the biggest killers on Ontario’s roads: 14 per cent of all people killed on our roads in 2013 died in collisions where speed was a factor.
  • In 2013, approximately three out of every four speed-related collisions occurred on municipal roads.
  • Studies show that lowering the speed limit from 50 km/h to 40 km/h in urban areas would reduce the number of deaths by half.

 

 

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