OPP: To Have 31 Cruisers Outfitted With Automatic Licence Plate Readers

Update: see previous posts – November 23, 2012 Automatic Licence Plate Readers (ALPR): Cornwall, Ontario Police Will Soon Have in 3 Cruisers, March 18, 2009 Automatic Licence Plate Recognition (ALPR) in British Columbia, March 15, 2009 Lights, Cameras, Roll’em (April 2009 – Toronto)

Automatic Licence Plate Reader on roof of OPP cruiser has infared cameras that can automatically read 36 licence plates in an hour - which is connected via computer to a number of data bases, including insurance, Ministry of Transportation and others.
Automatic Licence Plate Reader on roof of OPP cruiser has infared cameras that can automatically read 3,600 licence plates in an hour – which is connected via computer to a number of data bases, including insurance, Ministry of Transportation and others. If your licence is suspended, if your auto-insurance has lapsed, if your plates haven’t been renewed, if you have restrictions on your licence or if you have neglected to pay child support the computer systems which reveal that to the OPP officer and you’ll be pulled over.

see source

TORONTO – The Ontario Provincial Police will be equipping its cruisers with a new high-tech tool to help them catch suspended drivers on roads and highways.

The OPP announced on Wednesday it will install Automatic License Plate Recognition scanners in 27 of its vehicles, in addition to the existing fleet of four which are already in operation.

Police say system will make it more difficult for suspended drivers, drivers of stolen vehicles and other vehicles with plates in poor standing to drive undetected.

“The additional 27 vehicles will allow us to scan thousands more plates every day over a broader geographic range in the province,” said OPP Deputy Commissioner Bill Blair.

Automatic Licence Plate Readers.  The OPP had four (4) cruisers outfitted with these readers and have now added another 27 for a total of 31.
Automatic Licence Plate Readers. The OPP had four (4) cruisers outfitted with these readers and have now added another 27 for a total of 31.

The OPP will be using the Ministry of Transportation databases to scan driver information.

Officials say only those scanned plates that match the “hot list” will be stored for “evidentiary purposes.”

Police say data collected from plates that don’t generate a hit are automatically deleted from the onboard computer system every 10 minutes.

The system is capable of scanning approximately 3,600 plates per hour.

“Ontario motorists expect to be protected from unsafe drivers, but also not to be tracked as they go about their daily lives,” said Ontario Privacy Commissioner Ann Cavoukian. “We are pleased to report that the OPP used a Privacy by Design approach in developing its Automatic License Plate Recognition system.”

Police say an estimated 2.3 per cent of fatal motor vehicle collisions are attributed to motorists who drive while their licences are under suspension.

Approximately 250,000 Highway Traffic Act license suspensions are issued a year in Ontario.

It's only fair to share...
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterGoogle+Pin on Pinterestshare on TumblrShare on LinkedInShare on RedditEmail to someone

2 comments

  1. Having read this I thought it was very enlightening. I appreciate you taking the
    time and energy to put this article together. I once again find myself spending a lot of time both reading and leaving comments. But so what, it was still worth it!

  2. “Privacy by Design” can not include mass surveillance. With 31 vehicles, each scanning 3,600 plates per hour, they can scan up to 111,600 people per hour, or 1,339,200 people per 12 hours. That’s the population of Ontario every ten days worth of operating hours. Obviously they’ll rescan many people constantly, because these licence scanning cruisers can’t be everywhere, at least until they are.

    Canada has mandated that there is zero expectation of privacy on the roads. They can record and search and detain you, as well as force you to do silly things and take your blood. Now they scan you too. So what?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.