Ontario’s Demerit Points, as of September 1, 2015

Update: see previous posts – September 1, 2015 Police To Enforce the Making Ontario’s Roads Safer Act Starting Today, August 31, 2015 Ontario is Ready to Enforce Stiff Fines of up to $1,000 this Fall for Distracted Driving, June 3/15 New Ontario Road Laws Will Cost Ontarians Huge, June 2/15 Bill 31, Transportation Statute Law Amendment Act (Making Ontario’s Roads Safer), 2015 Receives Royal Assent

You don’t “lose” demerit points on your driving record. You start with zero points and gain points for being convicted of breaking certain traffic laws. Demerit points stay on your record for two years from the offence date. If you collect enough points, you can lose your driver’s licence.
You don’t “lose” demerit points on your driving record. You start with zero points and gain points for being convicted of breaking certain traffic laws.
Demerit points stay on your record for two years from the offence date. If you collect enough points, you can lose your driver’s licence.

see source

With the introduction of Bill 31, Transportation Statute Law Amendment Act (Making Ontario’s Roads Safer), 2015 that went into effect on September 1, 2015, there were significant changes to demerit points within Ontario.

This is what the Ontario Demerit Point chart looks like now.

TABLE

Column 1Column 2Column 3
ItemProvisions for OffencesNumber of Demerit PointsShort Description of Offences for Convenience of Reference only
1Section 200 of the Highway Traffic Act7Failing to remain at scene of accident
1.1Section 216 of the Highway Traffic Act, except where a suspension order is made under subsection 216 (3)7Driver failing to stop when signalled or requested to stop by a police officer
2Section 130 of the Highway Traffic Act6Careless driving
3Section 172 of the Highway Traffic Act6Racing
4Section 128 of the Highway Traffic Act; subsection 13 (3) of Regulation 829 of the Revised Regulations of Ontario, 1990; any provision of the National Capital Commission Traffic and Property Regulations CRC 1978, c. 1044 made under the National Capital Act (Canada) fixing maximum rates of speed and any municipal by-law fixing maximum rates of speed where the rate of speed is exceeded by,
(a) 50 km/h or more6Exceeding speed limit by 50 km/h or more
(b) 30 km/h or more and less than 50 km/h4Exceeding speed limit by 30 to 49 km/h
(c) more than 15 km/h and less than 30 km/h3Exceeding speed limit by 16 to 29 km/h
5Subsections 174 (1) and (2) of the Highway Traffic Act5Driver of public vehicle or school bus failing to stop at railway crossings
6Section 164 of the Highway Traffic Act3Driving through, around or under railway crossing barrier
7Subsections 135 (2) and (3), clause 136 (1) (b), subsection 136 (2), subsection 138 (1), subsection 139 (1), subsection 141 (5) and subsections 144 (7), (8) and (21) of the Highway Traffic Act3Failing to yield right of way
8Clause 136 (1) (a), subsections 144 (14), (15), (16), (17), (18) and (21), subsections 146 (3) and (4) and section 163 of the Highway Traffic Act, any municipal by-law requiring a driver to stop for a stop sign or signal light, and the National Capital Commission Traffic and Property Regulations CRC 1978, c. 1044 made under the National Capital Act (Canada) requiring a driver to stop for a stop sign3Failing to obey a stop sign, signal light or railway crossing signal
9Subsection 134 (1) of the Highway Traffic Act3Failing to obey directions of police constable
10Subsection 134 (3) of the Highway Traffic Act3Driving or operating a vehicle on a closed highway
11Subsections 199 (1) and (1.1) of the Highway Traffic Act3Failing to report an accident
12Subsection 148 (8), sections 149, 150 and 166 of the Highway Traffic Act3Improper passing
13Section 154 of the Highway Traffic Act3Improper driving where highway divided into lanes
14Subsections 175 (11) and (12) of the Highway Traffic Act6Failing to stop for school bus
15Section 158 of the Highway Traffic Act4Following too closely
16Section 162 of the Highway Traffic Act3Crowding driver’s seat
17Clause 156 (1) (a) of the Highway Traffic Act3Drive wrong way – divided highway
18Clause 156 (1) (b) of the Highway Traffic Act3Cross divided highway – no proper crossing provided
19Section 153 of the Highway Traffic Act3Wrong way in one way street or highway
20Subsection 157 (1) of the Highway Traffic Act2Backing on highway
21Subsections 140 (1), (2) and (3) of the Highway Traffic Act3Pedestrian crossover
22Subsections 148 (1), (2), (4), (5), (6) and (7) of the Highway Traffic Act2Failing to share road
23Subsections 141 (2) and (3) of the Highway Traffic Act2Improper right turn
24Subsections 141 (6) and (7) of the Highway Traffic Act2Improper left turn
25Subsections 142 (1), (2) and (8) of the Highway Traffic Act2Failing to signal
26Section 132 of the Highway Traffic Act2Unnecessary slow driving
27Section 168 of the Highway Traffic Act2Failing to lower headlamp beam
28Subsection 165 (1) of the Highway Traffic Act3Improper opening of vehicle door
29Section 143 and subsection 144 (9) of the Highway Traffic Act and any municipal by-law prohibiting turns2Prohibited turns
30Section 160 of the Highway Traffic Act2Towing of persons on toboggans, bicycles, skis, etc., prohibited
31Subsection 182 (2) of the Highway Traffic Act2Failing to obey signs prescribed by regulation under subsection 182 (1)
32Subsection 106 (2) of the Highway Traffic Act2Driver failing to properly wear seat belt
33Subclause 106 (4) (a) (i) of the Highway Traffic Act2Driving while passenger under 16 fails to occupy position with seat belt
33.1Subclause 106 (4) (a) (ii) of the Highway Traffic Act2Driving while passenger under 16 fails to properly wear seat belt
33.2Clause 106 (4) (b) of the Highway Traffic Act2Driving while child passenger not properly secured
34Subsection 8 (2) of Regulation 613 of the Revised Regulations of Ontario, 19902Driver failing to ensure infant passenger is secured as prescribed
34.1Subsection 8 (3) of Regulation 613 of the Revised Regulations of Ontario, 19902Driver failing to ensure toddler passenger is secured as prescribed
34.2Subsection 8 (4) of Regulation 613 of the Revised Regulations of Ontario, 19902Driver failing to ensure child passenger is secured as prescribed
35Clause 159 (1) (a) of the Highway Traffic Act3Failing to stop on right for emergency vehicle
36Clause 159 (1) (b) of the Highway Traffic Act3Failing to stop – nearest curb – for emergency vehicle
36.1Clause 159 (1) (b) of the Highway Traffic Act3Failing to stop – nearest edge of roadway – for emergency vehicle
36.2Subsection 159 (2) of the Highway Traffic Act3Failing to slow down and proceed with caution for emergency vehicle or tow truck
36.3Subsection 159 (3) of the Highway Traffic Act3Failing to move into another lane for emergency vehicle or tow truck – if safe to do so
36.4Subsection 159 (4) of the Highway Traffic Act3Following fire department vehicle too closely
37Subsection 79 (2) of the Highway Traffic Act3Motor vehicle equipped with or carrying a speed measuring warning device
38Subsection 154.1 (3) of the Highway Traffic Act3Improper use of high occupancy vehicle lane
39Subsection 146.1 (3) of the Highway Traffic Act3Failing to obey traffic control stop sign
40Subsection 146.1 (4) of the Highway Traffic Act3Failing to obey traffic control slow sign
41Subsection 176 (3) of the Highway Traffic Act3Failing to obey school crossing stop sign
42Section 78 of the Highway Traffic Act3Driving with display screen visible to driver
43Section 78.1 of the Highway Traffic Act3Driving while holding or using hand-held device
44Subsection 148 (6.1) of the Highway Traffic Act2Failing to leave one metre while passing bicycle

 

Understanding demerit points

Demerit points are added to your driver’s licence, if you are convicted of breaking certain driving laws. The rules are different depending on if you are a new driver or have a full licence. This information will explain how the demerit points system works.

How demerit points work

You don’t “lose” demerit points on your driving record. You start with zero points and gain points for being convicted of breaking certain traffic laws.

Demerit points stay on your record for two years from the offence date. If you collect enough points, you can lose your driver’s licence.

You can also get demerit points on your Ontario’s driver’s licence when you violate driving laws in:

  • other Canadian provinces and territories
  • the State of New York
  • the State of Michigan

What happens if I get out-of-province demerit points?

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