Ontario: If Police Detect “Radar Detectors” Big Fine, Points and Forfeiture

Update:

Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) cruiser. The OPP are finding that more vehicles that they are pulling over contain radar detector devices. Under section 79 of the Ontario Highway Traffic Act, OPP can search your vehicle and remove your radar detection device and provide you with a ticket that carries a fine of $179 and three (3) demerit points upon conviction.
Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) cruiser. The OPP are finding that more vehicles that they are pulling over contain radar detector devices. Under section 79 of the Ontario Highway Traffic Act, OPP can search your vehicle and remove your radar detection device and provide you with a ticket that carries a fine of $175 and three (3) demerit points upon conviction. photo by fightyourtickets.ca

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Radar Detectors are legal in Alberta, British Columbia and Saskatchewan. They are illegal in every other province and territory in Canada. photo by fightyourtickets.ca
Radar Detectors are legal in Alberta, British Columbia and Saskatchewan. They are illegal in every other province and territory in Canada. photo by fightyourtickets.ca

If you are caught carrying a radar detector in your vehicle in Ontario, police can confiscate your radar detector and you’ll receive a ticket, which carries a stiff fine ($175) and three (3) demerit points.

Here are traffic offences in Ontario which carry three (3) demerit points as a penalty:

Three points

  • Exceeding the speed limit by 16 to 29 km/h
  • Driving through, around or under a railway crossing barrier
  • Driving while holding or using a hand-held wireless communications/entertainment device or viewing a display screen unrelated to the driving task
  • Failing to yield the right-of-way
  • Failing to obey a stop sign, traffic light or railway crossing signal
  • Failing to obey traffic control stop sign
  • Failing to obey traffic control slow sign
  • Failing to obey school crossing stop sign
  • Failing to obey the directions of a police officer
  • Driving the wrong way on a divided road
  • Failing to report a collision to a police officer
  • Improper driving where road is divided into lanes
  • Crowding the driver’s seat
  • Going the wrong way on a one-way road
  • Driving or operating a vehicle on a closed road
  • Crossing a divided road where no proper crossing is provided
  • Failing to slow and carefully pass a stopped emergency vehicle
  • Failing to stop at a pedestrian crossing
  • Failing to move, where possible, into another lane when passing a stopped emergency vehicle
  • Driving a vehicle that is equipped with or carrying a speed measuring warning device (such as a radar detector)
  • Improper use of a high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) lane
Radar detectors do not work against LIDAR that police use. Police are able to detect radar detectors using technology such as The Spectre RDD. The Spectre RDD (radar detector detector) is a sophisticated, high performance RF receiver tuned specifically to detect radar detectors. It listens for the faint microwave emissions generated by a modern radar detector and delivers an audible and visual response.
Radar detectors do not work against LIDAR that police use. Police are able to detect radar detectors using technology such as The Spectre RDD. The Spectre RDD (radar detector detector) is a sophisticated, high performance RF receiver tuned specifically to detect radar detectors. It listens for the faint microwave emissions generated by a modern radar detector and delivers an audible and visual response. photo by fightyourtickets.ca

Here is what section 79 of the Highway Traffic Act of Ontario states:

Speed measuring warning devices

79. (1) In this section,

“speed measuring warning device” means any device or equipment designed or intended for use in a motor vehicle to warn the driver of the presence of speed measuring equipment in the vicinity and includes any device or equipment designed or intended for use in a motor vehicle to interfere with the effective operation of speed measuring equipment.  1996, c. 33, s. 12.

Speed measuring warning device prohibited

(2) No person shall drive on a highway a motor vehicle that is equipped with or that carries or contains a speed measuring warning device.  1996, c. 33, s. 12.

Powers of police officer

(3) A police officer may at any time, without a warrant, stop, enter and search a motor vehicle that he or she has reasonable grounds to believe is equipped with or carries or contains a speed measuring warning device contrary to subsection (2) and may seize and take away any speed measuring warning device found in or upon the motor vehicle.  1996, c. 33, s. 12.

Forfeiture of device

(4) Where a person is convicted of an offence under this section, any device seized under subsection (3) by means of which the offence was committed is forfeited to the Crown.  R.S.O. 1990, c. H.8, s. 79 (4).

Penalty

(5) Every person who contravenes subsection (2) is guilty of an offence and on conviction is liable to a fine of not less than $100 and not more than $1,000.  R.S.O. 1990, c. H.8, s. 79 (5).

Exception

(6) Subsection (2) does not apply to a person who is transporting speed measuring warning devices in sealed packages in a motor vehicle from a manufacturer to a consignee.  1996, c. 33, s. 12.

Sale of speed measuring warning devices prohibited

(7) No person shall sell, offer or advertise for sale a speed measuring warning device by retail.  1996, c. 33, s. 12.

Penalty

(8) Every person who contravenes subsection (7) is guilty of an offence and on conviction is liable,

(a) for a first offence, to a fine of not more than $1,000; and

(b) for each subsequent offence, to a fine of not more than $5,000.  R.S.O. 1990, c. H.8, s. 79 (8).

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