Ontario: $11 Minimum Wage Effective June 1, 2014

Update: see previous post – January 28, 2014 Ontario: Minimum Wage To Increase in April, 2014 to $11.12 hour After Four Year Freeze

After a 4 year free, the Minimum Wage will increase by .75 cents from $10.25 to $11.00. The minimum wage will be implemented on June 1, 2014 and the legislation which will be introduced will tie future increases to the minimum wage to the cost of living. Students will also receive a .70 cents raise in their minimum wage from $9.60 to $10.30 effective June 1, 2014.
After a 4 year freeze, the Minimum Wage in Ontario will increase by .75 cents from $10.25 to $11.00. The minimum wage will be implemented on June 1, 2014 and the legislation which will be introduced will tie future increases to the minimum wage to the cost of living. Students will also receive a .70 cents raise in their minimum wage from $9.60 to $10.30 effective June 1, 2014, along with everyone else’s minimum wage (liquor server’s, hunting/fishing guides & homeworkers)

see source

Ontario’s minimum wage will rise 75 cents to $11 on June 1, 2014 Premier Kathleen Wynne confirmed Thursday.

Her minority Liberal government will soon propose legislation linking future increases in the minimum wage, which has not changed since 2010, to the inflation rate.

‎“Improving the minimum wage will help increase the standard of living for hard-working people . . . while ensuring that businesses have the predictability necessary to plan.”

Anti-poverty groups had pushed for a $14 minimum wage, which the government had argued was too much of a leap.

Labour Minister Yasir Naqvi said linking the wage to inflation is “taking the politics out.”

The increase of 75 cents “falls short of the goal of lifting workers out of poverty and locks workers 16 per cent below the poverty line,” said Yvonne Kelly of the Social Planning Council of York Region.

Earlier this week, a provincial advisory panel called for future minimum wage increases to be pegged to inflation.

The $11 figure is roughly the level the minimum wage would be now had it been linked to inflation since 2010, but the Canadian Federation of Independent Business said that is too high.

“It doesn’t look like that much but if you’re a small business that’s struggling . . . it will have an impact on the payroll,” said spokesman Plamen Petkov, whose organization represents small- and medium-sized companies.

A higher minimum wage means higher payments for businesses into the Canada Pension Plan, employment insurance and employer health tax in a “compounding impact,” Petkov added.

However, the Ontario Convenience Stores Association said it supports the increase in the minimum wage to $11 and linking it to inflation and said the new wage should not lead to higher prices for consumers.

“Small business adjusts quickly . . . I don’t see this being a major factor,” chief executive Dave Bryans told reporters.

“Eleven dollars is much better than $14,” he added. “It could have been punishing. Stores would have closed at $14.”

Bryans said his organization’s support for the new minimum wage has nothing to do with its push for the province to allow the sale of beer and wine in corner stores.

“That’s another discussion for another day.”

Minimum wage is the lowest wage rate an employer can pay an employee. Most employees are eligible for minimum wage, whether they are full-time, part-time, casual employees, or are paid an hourly rate, commission, piece rate, flat rate or salary. Some employees have jobs that are exempt from the minimum wage provisions of the Employment Standards Act, 2000 (ESA). (See the Special Rule Tool for information on these job categories.)

Minimum Wage Rates

Minimum Wage RateCurrent wage ratesEffective June 1, 2014
(As announced)
General Minimum Wage$10.25
per hour
$11.00
per hour
Student Minimum Wage$9.60
per hour
$10.30
per hour
Liquor Servers Minimum Wage $8.90
per hour
$9.55
per hour
Hunting and Fishing Guides Minimum Wage $51.25$102.50$55.00
Rate for working less than five consecutive hours in a day$110.00
Rate for working five or more hours in a day whether or not the hours are consecutive
Homeworkers Wage
(110 per cent of the general minimum wage)
$11.28
per hour
$12.10
per hour

 

General minimum wage – This rate applies to most employees.

Student wage – This rate applies to students under the age of 18 who work 28 hours a week or less when school is in session or work during a school break or summer holidays.

Liquor servers wage – This hourly rate applies to employees who serve liquor directly to customers or guests in licensed premises as a regular part of their work. “Licensed premises” are businesses for which a license or permit has been issued under the Liquor Licence Act.

Hunting and fishing guides wage – The minimum wage for hunting and fishing guides is based on blocks of time instead of by the hour. They get a minimum amount for working less than five consecutive hours in a day, and a different amount for working five hours or more in a day–whether or not the hours are consecutive.

Homeworkers wage – Homeworkers are employees who do paid work in their own homes. For example, they may sew clothes for a clothing manufacturer, answer telephone calls for a call centre, or write software for a high-tech company. Note that students of any age (including students under the age of 18 years) who are employed as homeworkers must be paid the homeworker’s minimum wage.

Current Minimum Wage Rates Across Canada

Jurisdiction
General Minimum
Wage Rate
Effective Date
British Columbia
$ 8.75
$ 9.50
$ 10.25
May 1, 2011
November 1, 2011
May 1, 2012
Alberta
$ 8.80
$ 9.40
$ 9.75
$ 9.95
April 1, 2009
September 1, 2011
September 1, 2012
September 1, 2013
Saskatchewan
$ 9.25
$ 9.50
$ 10.00
May 1, 2009
September 1, 2011
December 1, 2012
Manitoba
$ 9.50
$ 10.00
$ 10.25
$ 10.45
October 1, 2010
October 1, 2011
October 1, 2012
October 1, 2013
Ontario
$ 10.25
$ 11.00
March 31, 2010
June 1, 2014
Quebec
$ 9.65
$ 9.90
$ 10.15
May 1, 2011
May 1, 2012
May 1, 2013
New Brunswick
$ 9.50
$ 10.00
April 1, 2011
April 12, 2012
Nova Scotia
$ 10.00
$ 10.15
$ 10.30
October 1, 2011
April 1, 2012
April 1, 2013
Prince Edward Island
$ 9.30
$ 9.60
$ 10.00
June 1, 2011
October 1, 2011
April 1, 2012
Newfoundland
& Labrador
$ 10.00
July 1, 2010
Northwest Territories
$ 10.00
April 1, 2011
Yukon
$ 9.00
$ 9.27
$ 10.30
$ 10.54
April 1, 2011
April 1, 2012
May 1, 2012
April 1, 2013
Nunavut
$ 11.00
January 1, 2011
Note: For workers in federal jurisdiction industries, the minimum wage is the general adult minimum wage rate of the province or territory where the work is performed.Updated on January 30, 2013 – see source
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