City of Toronto v. Uber Canada Court Case Delayed Until June

Update: see previous post – May 5, 2015 Uber Canada to Apply for Toronto Taxi Licence

The Superior Court of Justice at the Court House located at 361 University Avenue.
The Superior Court of Justice at the Court House located at 361 University Avenue.

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A hearing in the court case between the City of Toronto and Uber has been pushed back until next month, after a judge decided Monday to give both sides additional time to file evidence.

The city filed a legal action against the ride-sharing company late last year, alleging that the company is operating illegally and should be forced to shut down its operations in Toronto. The case was originally set to be heard in the Ontario Superior Court next week. But as a result of Monday’s decision, the case will now be pushed back by two weeks until June 1 – a decision that will have ripple effects at Toronto City Hall.

Exactly who asked for the adjournment is unclear. According to a source at Uber, the judge decided to push back the court date in order to give the city time to file additional arguments, and Uber time to review and respond to those arguments.

But, according to a statement from Toronto’s director of licensing, Tracey Cook, it was Uber that asked for the adjournment “to permit the parties time to file additional written materials.”

Despite the city’s opposition to this request, Ms. Cook’s statement said, the judge decided to move the hearing to June “to ensure that the judge who ultimately hears this application has the benefit of further written submissions from the parties.”

When asked for an interview on Monday, Ms. Cook declined to comment.

The court case has been closely watched by members of city council – in particular, Mayor John Tory, who just last week deferred a decision on taxi licensing until after the Uber court ruling, citing the need for ride-sharing technologies to be part of such discussions.

Monday’s decision to push back a court decision on Uber will probably mean that taxi-licensing debate will be pushed back as well.

Susie Heath, a spokeswoman for Uber, declined to comment on the latest developments Monday, citing company policy not to comment on matters before the courts. “While we do not comment on matters before the court,” Ms. Heath said, “I can tell you that we continue to believe that the best right path forward for riders and drivers is through regulation for ride-sharing rather than litigation.”

We were wrong, Toronto police say: Body cameras will record ‘carding’

Update:

Toronto police have been recording interactions with the public since 2011, with dashcams in their cruisers and unmarked vehicles.
Toronto police have been recording interactions with the public since 2011, with dashcams in their cruisers and unmarked vehicles. Crusiers are always filming and police wear microphones on their person and record interactions which are useful to them.

see source

A Toronto Police spokesperson says she was wrong when she told the National Post Monday that an upcoming body camera trial would not cover carding in most cases.

“There is no way to put this other than I was mistaken,” Meaghan Gray, the head of the department’s information and issues management section, said Tuesday.

On Monday Gray told the Post that police officers equipped with body cameras as part of a pilot project rolling out this month would not be recording when they “card” citizens not under arrest or investigation.

There is no way to put this other than I was mistaken

“Carding means different things to different people,” she said Monday. “If you’re talking about an investigative detention or an arrest, that would be part of that investigative nature. But the community engagements that we’re talking about or the informal interactions that we have with the public, no it’s not turned on.”

Presently, all Toronto Police vehicles are equipped with videocameras and police wear microphones. Now, police will wear bodycams, beginning in mid-May, 2015.
Presently, all Toronto Police vehicles are equipped with videocameras and police wear microphones. Now, police will wear bodycams, beginning on May 18, 2015.

That stance angered opponents of carding—the controversial practice of stopping citizens not under arrest or specific investigation and recording their personal data—one of whom, Andray Domise, told the Post it was an “absolutely laughable” policy.

In an interview Tuesday, however, Gray backtracked. She said that she had been mistaken Monday. In fact, she said, under the rules of the trial as written, officers will be expected to film any interaction that could be considered carding under any definition.

100 Toronto police officers have been pre-selected from the TAVIS Rapid Response Teams, Traffic Services, 55 Division Primary Response Unit and 43 Division Community Response Unit.
100 Toronto police officers have been pre-selected from the TAVIS Rapid Response Teams, Traffic Services, 55 Division Primary Response Unit and 43 Division Community Response Unit.

If officers are asking for information and they’re recording that information, the cameras will be filming, she said.

This is a photo of a "body camera" that 100 police will be wearing in a 12 month pilot project. 100 officers have been pre-selected from the TAVIS Rapid Response Teams, Traffic Services, 55 Division Primary Response Unit and 43 Division Community Response Unit. The cameras won't be on all the time and police will be able to turn them on and off as they see fit.
This is a photo of a “body camera” that 100 police will be wearing in a 12 month pilot project. 100 officers have been pre-selected from the TAVIS Rapid Response Teams, Traffic Services, 55 Division Primary Response Unit and 43 Division Community Response Unit. The cameras won’t be on all the time and police will be able to turn them on and off as they see fit.

The one-year trial will see 100 officers from four units wearing the cameras on shift starting May 18. The body-mounted devices won’t be on at all times, though.

Officers will turn on the cameras “prior to arriving at a call for service or when they start investigating an individual,” according to the police policy. They’ll turn them off “when the call for service or investigation is complete” or when the officer determines the recording is no longer serving its intended purpose.

Gray said Tuesday that “more often than not” the cameras would be turned on. She said an officer at a community barbecue, meeting the public, is an example of when the cameras would be off. Carding, contrary to what she said Monday, is not.

5 Things To Know

1. What Units/Divisions are participating in the pilot project?

100 officers have been pre-selected from the TAVIS Rapid Response Teams, Traffic Services, 55 Division Primary Response Unit and 43 Division Community Response Unit.

2. When will the body-worn camera be turned on and turned off?

A police officer will turn on the body-worn camera prior to arriving at a call for service or when they start investigating an individual or incident. A police officer will turn off the body-worn camera when the call for service or investigation is complete or when the officer determines that continuous recording is no longer serving its intended purpose.

3. When can a member of the public ask for the body-worn camera to be turned off?

The only time a request to turn off a body-worn camera will be allowed is when a police officer has been given permission to enter a private home and the person granting permission has made the request. This can happen either before the officer enters the private home or at any time during the officer’s presence in the private home.

4. How long will the body-worn camera data be stored?

Data will be stored for a minimum of one year unless there is a reason to retain it longer, such as for court purposes or an ongoing investigation.

5. Where will the body-worn camera data be stored?

The data will be encrypted and stored on a secure server owned and operated by the Toronto Police Service.

TTC: Customer Satisfaction Down 7% in 2014

Update:

TTC's subway system. Part of the customer dissatisfaction that TTC passengers express, is due to the behaviour of other passengers that they share a TTC car with.
TTC’s subway system. Part of the customer dissatisfaction that TTC passengers express, is due to the behaviour of other passengers that they share a TTC car with.

see source

ttc numbered stations rather than stations with names

TORONTO – Pride in the TTC got a rough ride last year.

Transit commissioners on Wednesday will be presented with the results of the 2014 customer satisfaction survey.

Passengers are frustrated when they have to wait for extended periods of time for a streetcar, only to have three or four show up together at the same time.
Passengers are frustrated when they have to wait for extended periods of time for a streetcar, only to have three or four show up together at the same time.

According to the survey of 1,000 people who use the TTC, pride in the TTC has dropped to 66% compared to the same time last year when pride was around 73%.

A line-up of TTC streetcars arriving simultaneously at the streetcar stop.
A line-up of TTC streetcars arriving simultaneously at the streetcar stop.

“Customers who are not proud of the TTC tend to be more educated, working full-time and to have higher household income,” reads the report on the survey results from the fourth quarter. “They are also more likely to be dissatisfied and perceive lower value for money.”

Museum subway station on the University subway line.
Museum subway station on the University subway line. Line 1 Yonge-University line.

Here’s some of the highlights from the survey:

  • 90% of those surveyed rate the value for money of the service as “average” or better.
  • 66% of those polled in the last quarter of 2014 have pride in the TTC and what it means to the city – that’s a decrease from 71% in the third quarter and 73% for the fourth quarter of 2013.
  • 74% is the average score for customer satisfaction over the last two years.
  • 69% of frequent riders gave the TTC a good/excellent satisfaction rating in the fourth quarter of 2014
  • 83% of occasional riders gave the TTC a good/excellent satisfaction rating in the fourth quarter of 2014
Victoria Park Bus with front-end bicycle rack, carrying two bicycles.
Victoria Park Bus with front-end bicycle rack, carrying two bicycles.

The top 3 things impacting customer satisfaction are different for each transit mode:

  • Subway: 1) Trip duration 2) Wait time 3) Smoothness during the trip
  • Bus: 1) Wait time 2) Trip duration 3) Helpfulness of operator
  • Streetcar: 1) Wait time 2) Trip duration 3) Crowding in the vehicle
TTC Headquarters located at 1900 Yonge St and Davisville Avenue in Toronto. Adjacent to the Davisville subway station.
TTC Headquarters located at 1900 Yonge St and Davisville Avenue in Toronto. Adjacent to the Davisville subway station.

B.C.: New Snow Tire Laws Come Into Effect Today (Oct.1-Mar.31/15).

Update:

Beginning today, Oct. 1, 2014, winter tires are required on many highways throughout the province. Signs are posted on each of the designated highways to advise motorists where winter tires are required. These are generally located approaching high mountain passes and interior highways where conditions can change from rain to snow very quickly.

see source

VICTORIA – With winter quickly approaching, the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure would like to remind motorists that beginning today, Oct. 1, 2014, winter tires are required on many highways throughout the province.

Signs are posted on each of the designated highways to advise motorists where winter tires are required. These are generally located approaching high mountain passes and interior highways where conditions can change from rain to snow very quickly.

Maps showing which roads require winter tires can be found on the ministry’s web page.

As a result of the technical analysis completed during the Rural Highway Safety and Speed Review, winter tires have been defined as those labelled with either the winter mountain/snowflake symbol or the mud and snow (M+S) designation. Winter tires must also be in good condition with a minimum tread depth of 3.5 mm.

There is also a new timeframe that winter tires are required on the high mountain passes. The new timeframe is October 1 to March 31 (it previously was October 1 to April 30).

The ministry encourages drivers to always drive to the road conditions and choose the best tires possible. Tires with the winter mountain/snowflake symbol provide the best level of traction and safety in severe snow and ice conditions.

The ministry has increased its commitment and funding in support of the multi-agency “Shift into Winter” campaign. In partnership with the ministry’s road safety partners, this safety initiative reminds motorists to prepare their vehicles, check DriveBC and to drive to road conditions.

A high-resolution image of the new provincial winter tire highway signage is now available.

Canada Post Demands Doctor’s Note For Door-to-Door Delivery

Update:see previous posts – February 21, 2014 Canada Post: Announces Initial Cuts to Services to Canadians, February 10, 2014 Canada Post: Why Did The Corporation Reject Banking When It Would Provide Profitable Revenue?, January 29. 2014 Canada Post: Harper’s Conservatives Vote to Kill Door-to-Door Mail Delivery, January 13, 2014 Canada Post: President/CEO Deepak Chopra On Non-Delivery of Mail After Ice Storm “I should have … I should have spoken earlier,”, January 1, 2014 Canada: Federal Conservatives Want to Fix Everyone Else’s Pensions/Benefits, But Not Their Own, December 31, 2013 Harper must defend consumers in mail cuts: Roseman, December 11, 2013 Canada Post: We Won’t Deliver (To Urban Homes Anymore), November 20, 2013 Canada Post: Settles $5 Million Lawsuit – Court Orders That Canada Post Will End Expressing Volumetric Weight in Units of Weight by October 30, 2015., August 21, 2013 Canada Post: Offers $5 million to End Shipping Charges Lawsuit

Canada Post wants to install Community Mail Boxes (CMB's) in every neighbourhood in an effort to end door-to-door delivery. If someone suggests that they cannot travel to their CMB to pick-up their mail and parcels; Canada Post will require Canadians to produce medical certificates from their physicians to justify this and Canada Post reserves the right to scrutinize the medical and challenge it.
Canada Post wants to install Community Mail Boxes (CMB’s) in every neighbourhood in an effort to end door-to-door delivery. If someone suggests that they cannot travel to their CMB to pick-up their mail and parcels; Canada Post will require Canadians to produce medical certificates from their physicians to justify this and Canada Post reserves the right to scrutinize the medical and challenge it.

see source

MONTREAL — If you can’t get to a community mailbox and want to continue to receive home delivery, you better get a doctor’s note.

Documents obtained by QMI Agency reveal Canada Post will ask disabled clients for proof before allowing letter carriers to continue dropping off the mail.

Union sources provided QMI with two forms, drafted by Canada Post, that will be sent to customers who say they’re unable to walk to their community mailbox.

The money-losing Crown corporation will phase out door-to-door delivery over five years beginning late this year and cut up to 8,000 jobs over the next 10 years.

The forms include several questions about a client’s disability and how the affliction “affects their ability to get to the community mailbox.”

Canada Post is still the best buy for consumers sending a letter anywhere in the world or a parcel anywhere in the world.
Canada Post is still the best buy for consumers sending a letter anywhere in the world or a parcel anywhere in the world.

The Crown corporation also says “certification from a qualified health care professional may be necessary.”

Canada Post asks doctors to provide personal information, including a phone number.

A spokesman for Canada’s privacy commissioner expressed concerns about the form and said the watchdog would contact Canada Post.

Montreal Mayor Denis Coderre, who has publicly lobbied against the Canada Post job cuts, called the move “disgusting and stupid.”

Canada Post spokesman Anick Losier defended the medical-approval forms.

“The information gathered will help our team to better understand the clients’ personal circumstances and undertake a dialogue with them about the type of help that would be most appropriate for each of them,” Losier said in an e-mail.