Transport Canada – Flying a Drone Recreationally

Update: see previous post – June 1, 2015 Canada: New Drone (Unmanned Air Vehicles – UAV’s) Laws on the Horizon

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If your aircraft weighs more than 35 kg, you must apply for a Special Flight Operations Certificate. If your aircraft weighs 35 kg or less and is used for the fun of flying only, you don’t need permission from Transport Canada. You must follow the law and fly safely – read our safety guidelines.

see source

Flying a drone recreationally

Unmanned air vehicle, model aircraft, remotely piloted aircraft system, drone. Call it what you want, but always think safety first.

Do you use a drone or unmanned air vehicle for work or research?
Learn how the rules apply to you
.

Think safety first

More and more people are flying drones for the fun of flying. Transport Canada regulates their use to keep the public and our airspace safe.

Before you take to the skies, make sure you understand the risks and learn how to avoid them.

If your aircraft weighs more than 35 kg, you must apply for a Special Flight Operations Certificate.

If your aircraft weighs 35 kg or less and is used for the fun of flying only, you don’t need permission from Transport Canada. You must follow the law and fly safely – read our safety guidelines.

Fly your drone legally

You are responsible to fly your drone safely and legally. In Canada, you must:

  • Follow the rules in the Canadian Aviation Regulations
  • Respect the Criminal Code, Trespass Act, as well as all municipal, provincial, and territorial laws regarding trespassing and privacy.
  • If you put aircraft at risk, fly where you are not allowed to, or endanger anyone’s safety, you could face serious consequences, including fines and jail time.

Fly your drone safely

Transport Canada recommends you follow the basic Do’s and Don’ts for flying your drone safely and legally. Not doing so can put lives, aircraft, and property at risk.

DoDon’t fly
  • Fly your drone during daylight and in good weather (not in clouds or fog).
  • Keep your drone in sight, where you can see it with your own eyes – not only through an on-board camera, monitor or smartphone.
  • Make sure your drone is safe for flight before take-off. Ask yourself, for example, are the batteries fully charged? Is it too cold to fly?
  • Know if you need to apply for a Special Flight Operations Certificate
  • Respect the privacy of others – avoid flying over private property or taking photos or videos without permission.
  • Closer than 9 km from any airport, heliport, or aerodrome.
  • Higher than 90 metres above the ground.
  • Closer than 150 metres from people, animals, buildings, structures, or vehicles.
  • In populated areas or near large groups of people, including sporting events, concerts, festivals, and firework shows.
  • Near moving vehicles, highways, bridges, busy streets or anywhere you could endanger or distract drivers.
  • Within restricted and controlled airspace, including near or over military bases, prisons, and forest fires.
  • Anywhere you may interfere with first responders.

Download the Do’s and Don’ts for flying your drone safely and legally (PDF)

Frequently Asked Questions

In aviation, you must always think safety first. In addition to respecting the Canadian Aviation Regulations, you must follow the rules in all acts and regulations—including the Criminal Code, as well as all municipal, provincial, and territorial laws regarding trespassing and privacy.If you think someone has committed a criminal offense, please contact your local police department.If you are concerned about the safe operation of an unmanned aircraft, report it to Transport Canada at [email protected].
Transport Canada regulates the use of all aircraft, manned and unmanned, to keep the public and our airspace safe.If an incident is reported to the department, one of our inspectors will verify that the operator followed the rules and used the drone safely. Local police may also verify if other laws were broken, including the Criminal Code and privacy laws. If you fly a drone for recreational purposes (for the fun of flying), it’s illegal to do anything that puts aviation safety at risk. The courts would decide on the penalty.
Yes. Transport Canada is exploring changes to the regulations that will address the growing popularity and economic importance of drones and integrate them safely into Canadian airspace. The department published a Notice of Proposed Amendment that highlights several proposed changes, including new flight rules, aircraft marking and registration requirements, knowledge testing, minimum age limits, and pilot permits for certain UAV operators.The Canadian public will have the opportunity to provide comments to the proposed regulation when they are published in Canada Gazette.
You may know them as “drones”, but the aviation community and Transport Canada use different terms.In Canada, our laws use two terms:

  • “Model aircraft,” which describes the devices usually used by hobbyists for recreational purposes.
  • “Unmanned Air Vehicle,” or UAV, which refers to unmanned aircraft more used for any non-recreational purposes (i.e. commercial, research and development, academia, first responders, etc).

Internationally the terms “unmanned aircraft system” (UAS) and “remotely piloted aircraft system” (RPAS) are used. The International Civil Aviation Organization uses “UAS” as a catch-all for all unmanned aircraft. Call it what you like – but Transport Canada expects you to operate it safely and legally.

Recreational use of a UAV is prohibited in national parks. The National Parks of Canada Aircraft Access Regulations prohibits aircraft landings and take-offs in national parks except by permission of the Superintendent for park management purposes or in emergencies. Please contact Parks Canada for more information.
Rules for drones vary from one country to another. Always check the local aviation regulations before you fly in that country.

Model aircraft hobbyists that belong to a recognized association, such as the Model Aeronautics Association of Canada, have a proven track record of operating safely. Following the MAAC safety guidelines and practices is considered an acceptable way of ensuring you fly safely.

 

Parts of Toronto & East York Speed Limit – 30 km/hour

Update:see previous post – June 22, 2015 30 Km/h Speed Limits in Downtown Toronto and East York

The cost to change signage in downtown Toronto and East York residential neighbourhoods is estimated to be $1.1 million.
In June, 2015 Toronto and East York Community Council, consisting of 12 City Councillors, unanimously voted in favour of reducing speeds from 40 km/h down to 30 km/h in those areas. This affects 387 kilometres of roads, thousands of city blocks in the downtown core and in East York.

see source

There was no budget for the signage replacement of $1 million, but the money will be found and the signs will begin to be changed in September, 2015.

Speed Limits

Stay within the maximum speed limit posted on signs along all roads. As a general rule, you will be safer if you drive at the same speed as traffic around you, without going over the speed limit.

Always drive at a speed that will let you stop safely, whether roads are wet or dry.

Where there are no posted speed limit signs, do not drive faster than:

  • 30 km/hour in parts of Toronto and East York (see map below)
  • 50 km/hour in cities, towns, villages and built-up areas
  • 80 km/hour in any other area

Fines

If you are convicted of speeding, you may receive demerit points in addition to fines.

Demerit points:

  • 3 points for going over the speed limit by 16 to 29 km/hour
  • 4 points for going over the speed limit by 30 to 49 km/hour
  • 6 points for going over the speed limit by 50 km/hour or more

Your fine will depend on how fast you were travelling over the posted speed limit:

Fines for driving over the speed limit
How much over the speed limitFine per km/h over the speed limit
Less than 20 km/h$3
20 to less than 30 km/h$4.50
30 to less than 50 km/h$7
50 km/h or more$9.75

Map Outlining Parts of Toronto & East York that now have a 30 km/h speed limit:

The speed reduction to 30 km/h will affect the following wards: 14,18,19,20,21,22,27,28,29,30,31 & 32.
The speed reduction to 30 km/h will affect the following wards: 14,18,19,20,21,22,27,28,29,30,31 & 32.

Ontario – Yield the Right-of-Way to Pedestrians Rules

Update:

diagram of a pedestrian crossover. The image shows a mid-block pedestrian crossover on a four-lane roadway. Two large white X marks appear on the roadway in the two lanes approaching the crossover. The crossover is marked by two sets of double white bars which run across the roadway. Two rectangular signs with a large black X and the word “pedestrians” in black on a white background are installed at the crossover on each side of the roadway – underneath, there are two signs with the message “stop for pedestrians”. Two rectangular amber signs with a black X marking are installed over the roadway, one for each direction of travel. There are two round amber lights near the inside edges of the rectangular amber signs. Pedestrians are crossing the road. Cars and a bicycle are stopped at the crossover. They must wait until pedestrians are on the sidewalk across the road before they proceed.

Drivers and cyclists must wait until pedestrians or crossing guards, have completely crossed the road and reached the sidewalk on the other side, before proceeding.

see source

Yield the Right of Way

There are times when you must yield the right-of-way to other drivers or pedestrians. This means you must let another person go first.

Remember: Signalling others does not give you the right-of-way. You must make sure the way is clear.

How and when to yield the right-of-way to other road users
WhereWhat to do
At an intersection without signs or signalsYield to any vehicle approaching you from the right.
At an intersection with stop signs at all cornersYield to the first vehicle to come to a complete stop. If two vehicles stop at the same time, the vehicle on the left should yield to the vehicle on the right.
At any intersection where you want to turn left or rightIf you are turning left, you must wait for approaching traffic to pass or turn, and for pedestrians in your path to cross.
If you are turning right, you must wait for pedestrians to cross if they are in your path.
At a yield signSlow down or stop if necessary to yield to traffic in the intersection or on the intersecting road.
When entering a road from a private road or drivewayYield to vehicles on the road and pedestrians on the sidewalk.
At marked pedestrian crosswalks, school crossings and all intersections where there is a  crossing guardYield the right-of-way to pedestrians in the crosswalk. Effective Jan. 1, 2016, drivers and cyclists must stop and yield the entire roadway at pedestrian crossovers, school crossings and all intersections where there is a crossing guard. Drivers and cyclists must wait for pedestrians and crossing guards to cross the entire roadway and safely reach the sidewalk, before proceeding.
Buses re-entering traffic from a bus bayYield to a bus that has indicated its intention to re-enter your lane from the bus bay

Ontario: Understanding Demerit Points – You Earn Them, You Don’t Lose Them.

Update:

When motorists commit a moving offence and are convicted of same, demerit points are added to their licence. The addition of demerit points have different consequences for drivers with a full licence, versus a new driver. Example: full licence = 15+ points: Your licence will be suspended for 30 days. A new driver's licence= 9 or more points: Your licence will be suspended for 60 days.
When motorists commit a moving offence and are convicted of same, demerit points are added to their licence. The addition of demerit points have different consequences for drivers with a full licence, versus a new driver. Example: full licence = Licence will be suspended for 30 days, if you accumulate 15+ points.  New driver’s licence = Licence will be suspended for 60 days, if you accumulate 9 or more points.

see source

Understanding Demerit Points

Demerit points are added to your driver’s licence, if you are convicted of breaking certain driving laws. The rules are different depending on if you are a new driver or have a full licence. This information will explain how the demerit points system works.


How demerit points work

You don’t “lose” demerit points on your driving record. You start with zero points and gain points for being convicted of breaking certain traffic laws.

Demerit points stay on your record for two years from the offence date. If you collect enough points, you can lose your driver’s licence.

You can also get demerit points on your Ontario’s driver’s licence when you violate driving laws in:

  • other Canadian provinces and territories
  • the State of New York
  • the State of Michigan

What happens if I get out-of-province demerit points?

How demerit points are applied

The number of points added to your driving record depends on the offence. Here are the number of points that will be recorded for certain violations.

7 demerit points will be added if you are convicted of:

  • failing to remain at the scene of a collision
  • failing to stop when signaled or asked by a police officer

6 demerit points will be added if you are convicted of:

  • careless driving
  • racing
  • exceeding the speed limit by 50 km/hour or more
  • failing to stop for a school bus

5 demerit points will be added if you are convicted of:

  • failing to stop at an unprotected railway crossing (for bus drivers only)

4 demerit points will be added if you are convicted of:

  • exceeding the speed limit by 30 to 49 km/hour
  • following too closely

3 demerit points will be added if you are convicted of:

  • driving while holding or using a hand-held wireless communications or entertainment device
  • driving while viewing a display screen unrelated to the driving task
  • exceeding the speed limit by 16 to 29 km/hour
  • driving through, around or under a railway crossing barrier
  • driving the wrong way on a divided road
  • driving or operating a vehicle on a closed road
  • failing to yield the right-of-way
  • failing to obey a stop sign, traffic control stop/slow sign, traffic light or railway crossing signal
  • failing to obey the directions of a police officer
  • failing to report a collision to a police officer
  • failing to slow and carefully pass a stopped emergency vehicle or a tow truck with its amber lights flashing
  • failing to move, where possible, into another lane when passing a stopped emergency vehicle or a tow truck with its amber lights flashing
  • improper passing
  • improper driving when road is divided into lanes
  • improper use of a high occupancy vehicle lane
  • going the wrong way on a one-way road
  • crossing a divided road where no proper crossing is provided
  • crowding the driver’s seat

2 demerit points will be added if you are convicted of:

  • improper right turn
  • improper left turn
  • improper opening of a vehicle door
  • prohibited turns
  • towing people — on toboggans, bicycles, skis
  • unnecessary slow driving
  • backing on highway
  • failing to lower headlamp beams
  • failing to obey signs
  • failing to stop at a pedestrian crossing
  • failing to share the road
  • failing to signal
  • driver failing to wear a seat belt
  • driver failing to ensure infant/child passenger is properly secured in an appropriate child restraint system or booster seat
  • driver failing to ensure that a passenger less than 23 kg is properly secured
  • driver failing to ensure that a passenger under 16 years is wearing a seat belt

More about demerit points in Ontario

Penalties for demerit points

The consequences for gaining demerit points depend on how many you have added to your driving record.

As a driver with a full licence, if you have:

2 to 8 points:
You will be sent a warning letter.

9 to 14 points:
Your licence could be suspended. You may have to attend an interview to discuss your driving record. At this meeting, you will need to provide reasons why your licence should not be suspended.

If you have to attend an interview, you will get a letter (Notice of Interview) to notify you of the time, date and location of the meeting. If you do not attend, your licence could be suspended.

If your Notice of Interview is dated January 1, 2016 or later, you will be required to pay $50.00 for your demerit point interview. The fee must be paid in person at any ServiceOntario Centre. You can pay the fee when you receive the Notice of Interview or within 10 business days of attending the interview. Failure to pay the interview fee will result in the cancellation of your driver’s licence.

15+ points:
Your licence will be suspended for 30 days.

When your licence is suspended, you will get a letter from the Ministry of Transportation. It will tell you the date your suspension takes effect and that you need to surrender your licence.

If you do not surrender your licence, you can lose your licence for up to two years.

How do I surrender my licence?

What happens if my licence is suspended?

Penalties for demerit points: new drivers

You are considered a novice – or new – driver if you have a G1, G2, M1, M2, M1-L or M2-L licence. As a new driver, you face different consequences for adding demerit points.

As a new driver, if you have:

2 to 5 points:
You will be sent a warning letter.

6 to 8 points:
Your licence could be suspended. You may have to attend an interview to discuss your driving record. At this meeting, you will need to provide reasons why your licence should not be suspended.

If you have to attend an interview, you will get a letter (Notice of Interview) to notify you of the time, date and location of the meeting. If you do not attend, your licence could be suspended.

If your Notice of Interview is dated January 1, 2016 or later, you will be required to pay $50.00 for your demerit point interview. The fee must be paid in person at any ServiceOntario Centre. You can pay the fee when you receive the Notice of Interview or within 10 business days of attending the interview. Failure to pay the interview fee will result in the cancellation of your driver’s licence.

9 or more points:
Your licence will be suspended for 60 days.

When your licence is suspended, you will get a letter from the Ministry of Transportation. It will tell you the date your suspension takes effect and that you need to surrender your licence.

If you do not surrender your licence, you can lose your licence for up to two years.

How do I surrender my licence?

What happens if my licence is suspended?

Long-form census: More jobs, better info. for northern Ontario

Update: see previous post – January 7, 2016 Canada has come to its’ Census – post Harper

The Harper government scrapped the census in 2011 and replaced it with the National Household Survey. Statistics Canada is now hiring workers to help conduct the 2016 census.

The Harper government scrapped the census in 2011 and replaced it with the National Household Survey. Statistics Canada is now hiring workers to help conduct the 2016 census.

see source

It’s been 10 years since the census featured a mandatory long-form questionnaire. Long form questionnaire is back for the 2016 census.

Statistics Canada is looking to hire 35,000 workers to conduct the 2016 long-form census — and many of those new jobs will be in northern Ontario.

Stats Canada will be hiring both enumerators and crew leaders for the next census, which will be held in May.

“For northeastern Ontario, we’re looking about 350 jobs,” said Gary Dillon, director of Ontario with Statistics Canada.

“For all of northern Ontario, we’re looking for about 1,000 people to hire. We hire in all communities big and small. We’re also working closely with the First Nations community leaders to get the word out about jobs.”

The long-form questionnaire was scrapped by the Harper Conservatives five years ago and replaced with the National Household Survey.

The data that was lost then, will be restored, and will be more specific when it comes to northern Ontario communities, said Tomasz Mrozewski, a data librarian at Laurentian University.

“So really detailed, localized, income data … we’re only going to get through the long form census,” he said.

Mrozewski said the reintroduction of the long-form census is a good thing for northern Ontario, but with a caveat:

According to StatsCan, the National Household Survey was 15 per cent more expensive than the long-form census, with poorer results

There were glaring errors in the NHS with respect to income data and immigration data
For northern Ontario specifically, the census is the ONLY look we get at socioeconomic data; other surveys cover provinces and large cities but for scholars studying the North this is the only reliable look we get at our area Restoration of the long-form census is great progress, but not everything we need to get a good insight into the North.

“In other words, [the census] is necessary, but not sufficient for good governance, policy making and research,” Mrozewski said.