Toronto front-yard parking pad ban mulled by council

Update:

Some Toronto councillors are seeking to expand the moratorium on parking pad permits.
Some Toronto councillors are seeking to expand the moratorium on parking pad permits. (CBC)

see source

Moratorium on parking spot permits could extend to Scarborough, North York, Etobicoke

Front-yard parking pads could be banned across the city in a move aimed at preserving streetscapes and protecting neighbourhoods against storm-water runoff, two Toronto councillors say.

Homeowners hoping to pave a parking spot on their front lawns require a permit from the city. Currently, there’s a moratorium on installing the pads in the old city of Toronto and few applications get approval. That moratorium could expand to Scarborough, North York and Etobicoke in the near future.

Some homeowners have managed to get city permits, but say the process was both difficult and expensive.

“The current bylaw is a joke,” Coun. Denzil Minnan-Wong told CBC News.

“We want a moratorium on people plowing under their front yards and putting parking in.”

Coun. Shelley Carroll, who also supports the ban, said paving over front lawns damages the community atmosphere of neighbourhoods and turns streets into a “sea of cars.”

“There should be a space in a suburban environment for communing with your neighbours.”

Carroll said paved front lawns also make storms more dangerous. She said the city is considering a new storm water runoff charge that’s based on the percentage of paved surfaces people have on their lots.

Should property owners get a say?

But for Mark Maclean, one of the few to win approval to install a parking pad, installing the structure was a safety decision. Now, he explains, his kids won’t have to walk onto the street to get into the car.

“There is no number we can attach to the fact our kids can get out of the front door and not have to be unsafe,” Maclean said, referring to the $10,000 landscaping bill that came with the parking area.

Maclean said it took him two years of negotiating with the city before he won approval for a parking pad outside his midtown home.

He said he thinks the city should be flexible in dealing with parking pads in the future.

In some areas, he said, the moratorium is a viable option, but at the same time he believes homeowners should be able to lobby for a parking spot.

“I think every homeowner on their private property should have an opportunity to make their case,” he said.

A citywide ban on new parking pads would require the approval of the entire city council.

Ottawa surprises top court judges by allowing assisted suicide to proceed in Quebec

Update:

The Supreme Court of Canada. The Supreme Court's ruling striking down the law banning assisted suicide was to have taken effect Feb. 6.
The Supreme Court of Canada. The Supreme Court’s ruling striking down the law banning assisted suicide was to have taken effect Feb. 6.

see source

Feds are willing to allow it in Quebec which has “a comprehensive scheme” to address the issue, but the rest of the country needs more time to draft laws, a federal lawyer has told judges in the Supreme Court, which earlier struck down the criminal ban.

OTTAWA—Ontario is scrambling to catch up to Quebec where doctors could soon legally aid terminally ill adult patients kill themselves after a stunning offer by federal lawyers to recognize — for now — the legality of Quebec’s right-to-die regime.

Federal lawyer Robert Frater made the surprise concession Monday at a Supreme Court of Canada hearing, where he sought a six-month extension for federal politicians to rewrite assisted suicide laws to provide more “clarity” to protect vulnerable people.

Ontario supports the federal bid for more time and says it, too, is drafting new medical guidelines.

Frater said only Quebec has come up with a “comprehensive scheme” to address concerns of physicians and patients after the high court ruled last year that people suffering a “grievous and irremediable medical condition” must be allowed to seek a doctor’s help to end their lives.

The Supreme Court ruled last winter a federal criminal ban on assisted suicide was unconstitutional, struck it down and gave Ottawa a year to rewrite it. That ruling takes effect Feb. 6.

On Monday, Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne said her government has asked the College of Physicians and Surgeons, which regulates the medical profession, to draft guidelines for doctors that could kick in right away if the court refuses to grant more time.

“We are acutely aware that if there is no extension that the province needs a protocol in place,” Wynne said. “If there is an extension, we will work with colleagues across the country and with the federal government to work on what that national protocol will be. But in the absence of that we will be prepared to bring that forward and obviously we make that public in due course.”

Ontario lawyer Malliha Wilson told the high court one issue under review is whether doctor-assisted suicide is a right only adults should have, or whether a “mature minor” should also have access. Quebec’s law grants access only to terminally ill adult patients.

Frater said Quebec’s law or any other provincial right-to-die regime may not, in the end, conform to Parliament’s ultimate approach. Not all provinces may even have a complete scheme by that time. But he said it is a reasonable period for legislators to deal with the “difficult” issues involved. “Everyone is doing their level best,” he said.

The federal offer to exempt Quebec doctors from criminal liability during the six months was a surprising move for two reasons: Ottawa previously supported an injunction to delay the Quebec law from taking effect; and it means the criminal law would remain in effect outside Quebec only.

It took several judges aback and prompted sharp questions.

Justices Russell Brown and Michael Moldaver asked if Ottawa was ceding to Quebec its criminal-law making power. Chief Justice Beverley McLachlin questioned Frater whether Ottawa’s position was “a matter of political acceptance or do you accept it from a legal point of view? . . . There still is this niggling problem, isn’t there, of whether the federal government would ever have to legislate if everybody did the same thing as Quebec?”

Justice Andromache Karakatsanis asked if it meant whether any conduct that complied with Quebec’s law would not be considered criminal. Justice Rosalie Abella challenged Frater why the same exemption shouldn’t be extended to individuals anywhere in the country who could persuade a superior court judge they met the conditions set out by the high court in its landmark 2014 Carter decision.

Brown, the last judge named by Conservative prime minister Stephen Harper, raised the possibility that Ottawa could grant itself an extension by simply exercising the constitutional “override” clause — a rarely-used and controversial power that allows legislators to sidestep the Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

“In theory at least if this court doesn’t grant an extension, can’t the minister ask parliament effectively for a suspension by way of exercising the override?” asked Brown.

Frater hesitated before saying the government “has said nothing other than that it will respect this court’s judgment about providing access in some form.”

He clarified that Ottawa has eyed an exemption only for doctors who act in Quebec under that law. He said a case-by-case personal exemption for individuals would not be a “carefully designed and monitored scheme” that the high court’s 2014 ruling called for.

Grace Pastine, litigation director for the British Columbia Civil Liberties Association, which led the legal challenge, said it “simply makes no sense that individuals who are critically ill and suffering could be able to access physician-assisted dying in Quebec but nowhere else in the country. What we’re saying is there has to be consistency for the rule of law to mean anything here.”

She said personal exemptions are not an ideal way to proceed because so few Canadians would be able to afford to litigate their right to die.

Lawyer Joseph Arvay, who represented the families of Gloria Taylor and Lee Carter — the two women in whose name the case was brought — called the federal position “nonsense.”

He said there was no risk of harm to the public if the ruling took effect on Feb. 6 because it already set out limitations or conditions in which physician-assisted suicide would be lawful, and that there would be no vacuum.

“You already read down (narrowed) the legislation. Why did you suspend (the effect of the ruling)? I don’t know that you needed to,” said Arvay. He suggested the federal government appears to be getting cold feet, and is not looking at how to implement the court decision but “whether to.”

Several judges disputed Arvay’s suggestion the ruling effectively drafted a new law. Moldaver said Parliament was given time to rewrite the law “to ensure so far as possible that we are not killing people who ought not to be killed.”

But Arvay said legislative procedural delays should not “trump” the constitutional rights of people who need physician-assisted dying.

“There’s not going to be a rush to the doctors’ offices to die on Feb. 6,” he said. “Most people don’t want to die . . . all physicians will be very reluctant to accede to the request unless a compelling case is made.

The judges reserved their decision.

Inside the Supreme Court of Canada. The Supreme Court Justices have reserved their decision in this matter.
Inside the Supreme Court of Canada. The Supreme Court Justices have reserved their decision in this matter.

With files from Robert Benzie

Options for the Supreme Court of Canada:

1) NO. The judges could refuse Ottawa’s request to extend the criminal ban for another six months. Until any new law is passed, last year’s Supreme Court ruling would prevail after Feb. 6. It said assisted suicide is constitutional when it occurs under a physician’s care, for consenting adults who determine they cannot tolerate the physical or psychological suffering brought on by a severe, incurable illness, disease or disability.

2) YES. The judges could grant Ottawa’s request for six more months and subject doctors who assist someone in committing suicide to criminal liability, except in the province of Quebec where physician-assisted dying would be legal under provincial health law once litigation over an injunction is resolved.

3) YES, BUT. The judges could grant Ottawa’s request to extend the criminal law for six more months, but allow individuals to go to court to get a judicial exemption to allow doctor-assisted suicide on a case-by-case basis in the meantime.

Canada has come to its’ Census – post Harper

Update:

In November, 2015 the recently elected Trudeau government announced the re-instatement of the long form census. Statistics Canada will need to hire 25,000 people to help carry out the long-form census in 2016, including almost 900 people in New Brunswick.
In November, 2015 the recently elected Trudeau government announced the re-instatement of the long form census. Statistics Canada will need to hire 25,000 people to help carry out the long-form census in 2016, including almost 900 people in New Brunswick.

see source

OTTAWA – If Statistics Canada was surprised by the Conservatives before the last census, this time it was ready for the unexpected.

Stephen Harper’s government revealed it would kill the mandatory long-form questionnaire less than a year before the 2011 census was mailed out and two years after an election campaign where the topic never came up. The statistics agency scrambled to get a voluntary National Household Survey in place.

When the Liberals were sworn into office in November, one of their first orders of business was to announce the reinstatement of the long-form census.

Census Program Datasets
Also, because most Canadians fill out the census online — 54 per cent in 2011 — changing details in a computer system was not a major overhaul.

The timeline seemed very tight — the first forms are to go out to residents in the North in February.

But Marc Hamel, the census program director general, says the agency had planned for risks associated with the 2016 census. One of those risks was if a new government decided to bring back the long questionnaire.

“It had already been in the public sphere that opposition parties last year were saying, if they were elected, they would bring back the mandatory long-form census, so we had started to look at how that would be possible,” Hamel said in an interview.

The agency decided to design the questionnaire in a more adaptable format.

Tweaks from past years

Rather than sending selected households separate pieces of mail with the short form and then the National Household Survey, the questionnaires were integrated into one document.

“That design was going to be efficient and it was going to work for both approaches,” said Hamel. “From that perspective, no redesign was required. We were simply able to move ahead with the same questionnaires that we had already designed for 2016.”

Also, because most Canadians fill out the census online — 54 per cent in 2011 — changing details in a computer system was not a major overhaul.

The national statistics agency will need to hire 25,000 enumerators and 4,000 supervisors later this year to carry out the census. The pay rate for enumerators ranges from $16.31 to $19.91 per hour, plus expenses. The agency will be looking for people to work 20 hours a week.

The letter that accompanies the questionnaires will allow the agency to underline that the long part is mandatory again. Census staff will also drive home the message.

Fewer people will have to fill out the long form than last time, one in four households rather than one in three with the NHS. Statistics Canada has had to print more short-form questionnaires as a result of the change.

The agency doesn’t think it will save money with fewer people getting the bigger package. It expects it will have more responses to process because of the return to the mandatory format.

The main challenge will come from adjusting to the data logistics of bringing back the long-form census. Bar codes help the agency keep track of where they drop off which forms and some of that work will have to be rejigged.

There will also be a public awareness campaign to make sure that people realize they need to fill out the forms. Hamel says the agency never really emphasizes the penalties associated with not filling out the forms — a $500 fine or up to three months in jail, or both.

“Census information is really important, and that’s where we put the focus,” said Hamel.

“What do we use the census information for, why is it important for communities, and why is it important for people to participate.”

Census day is May 10, and most people will begin receiving letters and packages on May 2.

Statistics Canada is also busy hiring, looking for about 35,000 workers to help with the census. Details are on its website at www.census.gc.ca.

Ontario Increases Vehicle Licensing Fees in 2016/17 & 2018

Update:

Licensing fees will increase beginning on January 1, 2016 and increases will continue into 2018.
Licensing fees will increase beginning on January 1, 2016 and increases will continue into 2018.

see source

The Ontario government is going to reach a little further into the pockets of drivers and vehicle owners in the new year.

The province will be moving forward with a series of driver and vehicle license fee increases set to go up on January 1st.

While driver’s license applications and renewal fees will remain unchanged, vehicle license validation, plate fees, trailers and farm vehicle permits will see owners having to shell out even more than what many already consider too much.

The annual fee for vehicle permit, number plate and validation fees for a trailer will increase from $53 to $59, while the cost of a license plate will go from $20 to $25.

The annual validation fee for heavy farm vehicles will see the biggest jump, up to $1,100 from $975. Smaller farm vehicles will go from $123 to $140.

In Southern Ontario, the cost of commercial vehicle validation for business or personal use will see an increase from $108 to $120.

The new year will also see the roll out of a new $50 fee for drivers that are required to attend demerit point interviews.

Ontario's Queens Park (above). The province says the fee increases are needed to generate additional revenue to support the maintenance of Ontario’s 16,900 kilometres of roads, highways and 2,800 bridges that connect them. They say that until last year, there had not been an increase in many fees in the previous 15 years.
Ontario’s Queens Park (above).
The province says the fee increases are needed to generate additional revenue to support the maintenance of Ontario’s 16,900 kilometres of roads, highways and 2,800 bridges that connect them. They say that until last year, there had not been an increase in many fees in the previous 15 years.

Fee Changes 2015 – 2018

Service2015201620172018
Vehicle licence validation

  • Northern Ontario
  • Southern Ontario
$54 (September 1)
$108 (September 1)
$60 (September 1)
$120 (September 1)
$60
$120
$60
$120
Driver’s licence original and renewal$81.50 (September 1)$81.50$81.50$81.50
Driver’s licence replacement (including Enhanced driver’s licence)$28 (November 1)$28$31 (January 1)$31
Driver instructor licence replacement$28 (November 1)$28$28$28
Heavy commercial vehicle validation

  • Minimum – 3,001 to 3,500 kg
  • Maximum – 63,001 to 63,500 kg
$185
$4,601
$188.75 (December 1)
$4,693 (December 1)
$188.75
$4,693
$188.75
$4,693
Commercial vehicle validation, personal use

  • Northern Ontario
  • Southern Ontario
$54 (September 1)
$108 (September 1)
$60 (September 1)
$120 (September 1)
$60
$120
$60
$120
Commercial vehicle validation, business use$108 (September 1)$120 (September 1)$120$120
Permit issue (original or replacement), motor vehicle and trailer$14$20 (January 1)$32 (January 1)$32
Farm vehicle validation

  • Minimum – 3,001 to 3,500 kg
  • Maximum – 63,001 to 63,500 kg
$123 (January 1)
$975 (January 1)
$140 (January 1)
$1,110 (January 1)
$142.75 (January 1)
$1,132.25 (January 1)
$142.75
$1,132.25
Bus validation

  • Minimum – 1 to 2,500 kg
  • Maximum – 39,001 to 40,000 kg
$120 (November 1)
$2,015 (November 1)
$120
$2,015
$122.50 (January 1)
$2,055.25 (January 1)
$122.50
$2,055.25
Vehicle number plate (i.e., licence plate)$20 (November 1)$25 (November 1)$25$27 (January 1)
Vehicle permit, number plate and validation for a trailer$53 (January 1)$59 (January 1)$72 (January 1)$72
Service plates

  • Dealer and service plates
  • Motorcycle/service plate
$156
$87
$172 (January 1)
$96 (January 1)
$172
$96
$172
$96

Ontario: New Tougher Laws in 2016 for Pedestrian Crossovers/School Crossings

Update: see previous posts – Police To Enforce the Making Ontario’s Roads Safer Act, Bill 31 Starting Today

Road safety: Pedestrians

New rules at pedestrian crossovers and school crossings

Starting January 1st, 2016, drivers (including cyclists) must stop and yield the whole roadway at:

  • pedestrian crossovers; and,
  • at school crossings where there is a crossing guard displaying a school crossing stop sign.

These rules apply at pedestrian crossovers identified with specific signs, road markings and lights – the new rules do not apply to pedestrian crosswalks at intersections with stop signs or traffic signals, unless a school crossing guard is present.

The new law, part of Making Ontario’s Roads Safer Act, also provides municipal road authorities the ability to install new types of pedestrian crossovers on low speed, low volume roads in addition to the existing crossovers.

It is up to both drivers and pedestrians to keep everyone safe on Ontario roads. Learn more about how to stay safe as a pedestrian and as a driver.

For Pedestrians

It is up to both drivers and pedestrians to keep everyone safe on Ontario roads. Learn more about how to stay safe as a pedestrian and as a driver.

  • Cross only at marked crosswalks or traffic lights. Don’t cross in the middle of the block or between parked cars.
  • Make sure drivers see you before you cross. If the driver is stopped, make eye contact before you step into the road.
  • Wear bright or light-coloured clothing or reflective strips, especially at dusk or when it’s dark.
  • At a traffic light:
    • Cross when traffic has come to a complete stop.
    • Cross at the start of a green light.
    • Don’t cross once the “Don’t Walk” signal starts to flash or the light turns yellow.
    • Never cross on a red light.
  • Watch for traffic turning at intersections or turning into and leaving driveways.

For Drivers

Pay special attention to pedestrians as you drive. Here are some tips to follow:

  • Always look for pedestrians, especially when turning.
  • Watch for children. Drive slowly and cautiously through school zones, residential areas, or any other area where children could be walking or playing.
  • Watch out for Community Safety Zone signs that indicate areas where there is a special risk to pedestrians.
  • Be patient, especially with seniors or pedestrians with disabilities who need more time to cross the road.
  • Drive carefully near streetcar stops with islands or zones for passengers getting on and off. Pass them at reasonable speeds, and always be ready in case pedestrians make sudden or unexpected moves.

Fines

Drivers will be fined $150 to $500 and 3 demerit points for offences at pedestrian crossings, school crossings and at crosswalks where there are traffic signals. The maximum fine for running a red light – a practice that puts pedestrians at risk – is $200 to $1000.

Fines are doubled in Community Safety Zones, near schools and public areas. These areas are clearly marked with signs.


For Parents

Show your children how to cross a road safely. Teach them to:

  • Stay to the side of the road, walking as far away from traffic as they safely can
  • Stop and look both ways at the edge of the sidewalk before they cross a road
  • Take extra care on roadways that have no curbs
  • Watch out for blind corners (for example, a car coming out of an alley may not see a child pedestrian about to cross).

New Pedestrian Safety Changes – Frequently Asked Questions

Q1: What is the new law for pedestrians?

Q2: Why are cyclists included with cars in this law?

Q3: Why did the province make this change?

Q4: Where does the new law apply? Not apply?

Q5: What is the difference between a pedestrian crossover and a crosswalk? Are they different?

Q6: What is a school crossing?

Q7: Does the law apply province wide?

Q8: What are the penalties?

Q9: Are there any new types of crossovers where this law will apply?

Q1: What is the new law for pedestrians?

Effective Jan. 1, 2016, drivers and cyclists must stop and yield the entire roadway at:

  • pedestrian crossovers; and,
  • school crossings  and all intersections where there is a crossing guard.

Only when pedestrians and school crossing guards are safely on the sidewalk, can drivers and cyclists proceed.

Q2: Why are cyclists included with cars in this law? 

Cyclists must follow the same rules as drivers and may face the same fine as drivers – the new law requires cyclists to stop and yield the whole roadway to pedestrians and school crossing guards before proceeding.

Q3:  Why did the province make this change?

This new law is intended to make roads safer for school children, pedestrians and school crossing guards.  Pedestrians, school children and school crossing guards are among the most vulnerable road users. The new law responds to recommendations related to pedestrian safety in the Chief Coroner’s Report on Pedestrian Deaths released in 2012 and also to numerous requests from municipalities and safety organizations.

Q4: Where does the new law apply?  Not apply?

Applies at:Does not apply at:
  • All pedestrian crossovers.
  • School crossings and any location where a school crossing guard is present.
  • Crosswalks – with or without traffic signals or stop signs – unless a school crossing guard is present

Q5: What is the difference between a pedestrian crossover and a crosswalk?  Are they different?

They are different.  The new law applies at pedestrian crossovers, not at crosswalks – unless a school crossing guard is present.

Pedestrian crossovers are identified by specific signs, pavement markings and lights – they have illuminated overhead lights/warning signs and pedestrian push buttons.

diagram of a pedestrian crossover. The image shows a mid-block pedestrian crossover on a four-lane roadway. Two large white X marks appear on the roadway in the two lanes approaching the crossover. The crossover is marked by two sets of double white bars which run across the roadway. Two rectangular signs with a large black X and the word “pedestrians” in black on a white background are installed at the crossover on each side of the roadway – underneath, there are two signs with the message “stop for pedestrians”. Two rectangular amber signs with a black X marking are installed over the roadway, one for each direction of travel. There are two round amber lights near the inside edges of the rectangular amber signs. Pedestrians are crossing the road. Cars and a bicycle are stopped at the crossover. They must wait until pedestrians are on the sidewalk across the road before they proceed.

Drivers and cyclists must wait until pedestrians have completely crossed the road

A crosswalk is a crossing location usually found at intersections with traffic signals, pedestrian signals or stop signs. A crosswalk can be:

  • the portion of a roadway that connects sidewalks on opposite sides of the roadway into a continuous path; or,
  • the portion of a roadway that is indicated for pedestrian crossing by signs, lines or other markings on the surface of the roadway at any location, including an intersection.

diagram of crosswalks at an intersection with traffic signals and pedestrian signals. The image shows a four-way intersection of two two-lane roadways. There are two traffic signals for each direction of travel. There are four crosswalks which link the corners of the intersection. Each crosswalk is marked by two parallel white bars that run across the roadway. There is a pedestrian signal at each end of every crosswalk. Cars and bicycles are stopped at stop lines marked by white bars on one roadway. Stopped cars and bicycles are facing a red light. Pedestrians who face a lit-up “walking person” symbol in white on the pedestrian signal are crossing the roadway. When this symbol is not lit up and the orange hand symbol is lit up, pedestrians are not allowed to enter the crosswalk. Cars and bicycles proceed through the intersection when the traffic light they face turns green.

Illustration of crosswalks at an intersection with traffic signals and pedestrian signals

Q6: What is a school crossing?

A school crossing is any pedestrian crossing where a school crossing guard is present and displaying a school crossing stop sign.

diagram of an example of a school crossing. The image shows a mid-block pedestrian crosswalk on a two-lane roadway marked by two sets of double white bars which run across the roadway. Two rectangular signs with black symbols of two school children crossing on a fluorescent yellow green background are installed at the school crossing on each side of the roadway – underneath, there are two fluorescent yellow green signs with the message “school crossing” in black. A school crossing guard is showing a school crossing stop sign to cars and bicycles stopped at the crossing. Children are crossing the road. Cars and bicycles must wait until the school crossing guard and children crossing the road are on the sidewalk across the roadway before they proceed.

Drivers and cyclists must wait until children, school crossing guards and all pedestrians have completely crossed the road

Q7: Does the law apply province wide?

Starting January 1, 2016 the new law applies province wide to all pedestrian crossovers, school crossings and all intersections where a school crossing guard is present.

Q8: What are the penalties?

Drivers and cyclists may face a fine in the range of $150-$500 – drivers may also face 3 demerit points. Fines will be doubled in community safety zones.

Q9: Are there any new types of crossovers where this law will apply?

Yes. In response to requests from municipalities for more options for pedestrian crossovers, starting January 1, 2016, municipal road authorities may choose to install one of the new types of crossovers. The law will apply to these new types of pedestrian crossovers in municipalities that choose to install them.

diagram of a pedestrian crossover. The image shows a mid-block pedestrian crossover on a two-lane roadway. A ladder crosswalk, consisting of many white parallel bars between two perpendicular white outer lines, runs across the roadway. A yield to pedestrians line made of white triangles with the bottom points facing the direction of approaching traffic appears on the roadway in each direction of travel before the crossover. These lines look like shark teeth. There are two rectangular signs with a black symbol of a person crossing from right to left on a white background installed at the crossover: one on a pole on the side of the roadway and another one above the roadway facing approaching traffic. There is a rectangular flashing light above the sign on the side of the roadway and underneath a sign which reads “stop for pedestrians”. The signs and light are also installed on the other side of the crossover, but the black symbols show a person crossing from right to left. Pedestrians are crossing the road. Cars and a bicycle are stopped at the shark teeth lines. They must wait until pedestrians are on the sidewalk across the road before they proceed.

Drivers and cyclists must wait until pedestrians have completely crossed the road

diagram of a pedestrian crossover. The image shows a mid-block pedestrian crossover on a two-lane roadway. A ladder crosswalk, consisting of many white parallel bars between two white outer lines, runs across the roadway. A yield to pedestrians line made of white triangles with the bottom points facing the direction of approaching traffic appears on the roadway in each direction of travel before the crossover. These lines look like shark teeth. A rectangular sign with a black symbol of a person crossing the road from right to left on a white background is installed at the crossover on the side of the roadway. There is a rectangular flashing light above the sign and a sign underneath which reads “stop for pedestrians”. The signs and light are also installed on the other side of the crossover, but the black symbols show a person crossing from right to left. Pedestrians are crossing the road. Cars and a bicycle are stopped at the shark teeth lines. They must wait until pedestrians are on the sidewalk across the road before they proceed.

Drivers and cyclists must wait until pedestrians have completely crossed the road

diagram of a pedestrian crossover. The image shows a mid-block pedestrian crossover on a two-lane roadway. A ladder crosswalk, consisting of many white parallel bars between two white outer lines, runs across the roadway. A yield to pedestrians line made of white triangles with the bottom points facing the direction of approaching traffic appears on the roadway in each direction of travel before the crossover. These lines look like shark teeth. A rectangular sign with a black symbol of a person crossing from right to left on a white background is installed at the crossover on the side of the roadway. There is also a sign which reads “stop for pedestrians” under that sign. The signs are also installed on the other side of the crossover, but the black symbols show a person crossing from right to left. Pedestrians are crossing the road. Cars and a bicycle are stopped at the shark teeth lines. They must wait until pedestrians are on the sidewalk across the road before they proceed.

Drivers and cyclists must wait until pedestrians have completely crossed the road


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