Premier Kathleen Wynne Introduces Photo-Radar into Ontario Communities

Update:

Ontario Premier Wynn has renamed Photo Radar (as Automated speed enforcement or(ASE) technology) which will now be introduced on municipal roads, which takes pictures of speeders' licence plates and is already used in many parts of North America and Europe, and for community safety zones and school zones. photo by fightyourtickets.ca
Ontario Premier Wynne has renamed Photo Radar (as Automated speed enforcement or(ASE) technology) which will now be introduced on municipal roads, which take pictures of speeders’ licence plates in Ontario’s community safety zones and school zones. The legislation that she will pass, will allow municipalities to lower default speed limits from 50 km/h down to 40 or even 30 km/h. photo by fightyourtickets.ca.

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Red Light Camera at the intersection of Gerrard Street West and University Avenue
Wynn has committed to streamline the process for Ontario cities to introduce red light cameras at every intersection in every municipality. photo by fightyourtickets.ca

Ontario intends to introduce legislation that would target unsafe drivers and help protect school children, seniors, other pedestrians and cyclists.

Premier Wynn will allow cities to install photo radar in any community safety zone or school zone. photo by fightyourtickets.ca
Premier Wynn will allow cities to install photo radar in any community safety zone or school zone. photo by fightyourtickets.ca

Premier Kathleen Wynne was in Ottawa today to announce intended legislation that, if passed, would give municipalities more tools to improve safety in community safety zones and school zones.

These measures would include:

  • Automated speed enforcement (ASE) technology on municipal roads, which takes pictures of speeders’ licence plates and is already used in many parts of North America and Europe, and for community safety zones and school zones
  • The ability to create zones with reduced speed limits to decrease the severity of pedestrian-vehicle collisions in urban areas
  • A streamlined process for municipalities to participate in Ontario’s Red Light Camera program without the need for lengthy regulatory approval.

    If you are convicted of speeding in a community safety zone, the fine that must be paid, is doubled. photo by fightyourtickets.ca
    If you are convicted of speeding in a community safety zone, the fine that must be paid, is doubled. photo by fightyourtickets.ca.

 

Ontario has heard from municipalities seeking to improve safety in their communities in the wake of collisions involving children, seniors, other pedestrians and cyclists, and is proposing these changes as a result.

Making roads safer for cyclists and pedestrians of all ages by giving municipalities options to enforce traffic laws is part of Ontario’s plan to create jobs, grow our economy and help people in their everyday lives.

 

 

 

 

Quick Facts:

  • Speed is one of the biggest killers on Ontario’s roads: 14 per cent of all people killed on our roads in 2013 died in collisions where speed was a factor.
  • In 2013, approximately three out of every four speed-related collisions occurred on municipal roads.
  • Studies show that lowering the speed limit from 50 km/h to 40 km/h in urban areas would reduce the number of deaths by half.

 

 

Seatbelt Blitz by Toronto Police – October 3-7, 2016 inclusive

Update:

The seatbelt blitz by the Toronto Police Services begin on Monday, October 3 and ends on Friday, October 7, 2016.
The seatbelt blitz by the Toronto Police Services begin on Monday, October 3 and ends on Friday, October 7, 2016. photo by fightyourtickets.ca

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Traffic safety continues to be a Service priority for the TPS. On Monday, October 3, 2016, the Service will be launching the annual fall provincial seat belt campaign: C.R.A.S.H., with a focus on car seats, booster seats and seat belts.

The campaign will start on Monday, October 3, 2016 and conclude on Friday, October 7, 2016. The seat belt campaign has the full support of the Ontario Association of Chiefs of Police and is a combined public awareness and enforcement campaign aimed at getting all drivers and passengers to buckle up. Using seat belts is the single most effective way to reduce vehicle-related injuries and fatalities by ensuring that occupants remain in the vehicle and in their seats.

All police officers will be paying particular attention to the proper restraint of all vehicle occupants including any children. It is estimated that, for every one per cent increase in seat belt use, five lives are saved in Ontario every year. The fall seat belt campaign will focus on drivers who fail to secure children safely. Child car-seat inspection clinics have shown that over 80 per cent of car seats are installed or used incorrectly.

Seatbelt laws have been in effect for the last forty (40) years in Ontario. photo by fightyourtickets.ca

The potential consequences for not using seat belts or not using them correctly are:

– loss of life
– serious injury
– demerit points accumulated against your driver’s licence
– financial costs

Driver who ran red light and killed cyclist sentenced to 2 years in jail

Update:

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The intersection was shut down after Adrian Dudzicki, 23 was hit by Aleksev. Photo by fightyourtickets.ca

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Aleksey Aleksev, 23, was convicted of criminal negligence causing death earlier this year

Adrian Dudzicki, 23, was cycling to squash practice on the morning he was killed by a driver who recklessly sped through a red light at an intersection in North York.

The now 23-year-old driver, Aleksey Aleksev, was sentenced Wednesday to a jail term of two years less a day, three years of probation and a ban on driving for 15 years.

Earlier this year Superior Court Justice Gary Trotter found Aleksev guilty of dangerous driving causing death, criminal negligence causing death and, unusually, manslaughter.

However, in his Wednesday ruling, Trotter said he would be sentencing Aleksev on the count of criminal negligence causing death and staying the two other convictions since the law prohibits a person from being convicted on multiple counts for the same offence.

He stressed that his decision to sentence Aleksev for criminal negligence causing death rather than manslaughter made no difference to the sentence and does not diminish the severity of the crime or the devastation to Dudzicki’s family.

Trotter noted that this case did not involve alcohol or drugs; Aleksev claimed he was distracted by adjusting the heating or the radio shortly before the November 2013 crash.

“This case is a sad reminder of the devastation that can be caused by the egregious conduct of a sober driver,” Trotter said.

He referred to the many victim impact statements submitted by Dudzicki’s family and friends, quoting the words of his parents.

“My life will never be the same again. He was all I had,” his mother Ewa Dudzicka told the court.

“There is just emptiness,” his father Jaroslaw Dudzicki said. “There is no hope.”

After the ruling, Jaroslaw Dudzicki said he had been hoping the court process would lead to closure, but he still has many unanswered questions.

Among them, what responsibility Aleksev’s parents carry for allowing their son to continue driving recklessly. Aleksev had a history of driving infractions, including speeding tickets, court heard.

“How did he get behind the wheel?” Dudzicki said.

Man Charged with Assault of Toronto Parking Enforcement Officer

Update:

Parking tickets placed on vehicle by Toronto Parking Enforcement Officers. photo by fightyourtickets.ca

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Toronto Police Cruiser. Kofi Patrong has finally won his battle to sue Toronto Police for negligence, after being shot in the leg by a member of the Galloway Boys. photo by fightyourtickets.ca
Toronto Police Cruiser. Police released arrest details surrounding the alleged assault of a parking enforcement officer on Sept. 8 at 12:00 a.m. photo by fightyourtickets.ca

Man, 40, charged with Assault on Parking Enforcement Officer in the area of
Forest Laneway and Doris Avenue.

Toronto Police Services Board's Parking Enforcement Officer preparing a parking ticket for a vehicle.
Toronto Parking Enforcement Officer, placing a parking ticket on vehicle. photo by fightyourtickets.ca

Toronto Police issued a news release today surrounding this alleged incident that took place within Toronto Police Services 32 division on the morning of September 8, 2016 near Yonge St. and Sheppard Ave in North York. According to police, the assault of the parking enforcement office, followed an argument.

Case #: 2016-1592107

The Toronto Police Service has arrested and charged a man for an Assault.

It is alleged that:

Parking enforcement officer placing a parking ticket on a van. Normally, enforcement officers do not ticket a vehicle, while the driver is occupying the vehicle, to prevent unnecessary confrontations. photo by fightyourtickets.ca

– on Thursday, September 8, 2016, at 12 a.m. a Toronto Police Service Parking Enforcement Officer was conducting his duties in the Forest Laneway and Doris Avenue area

– he was in the process of writing a ticket for a parked van, blocking a disabled ramp and partially blocking the fire route

– the van owner got into a verbal altercation and assaulted the Parking Enforcement Officer

Jeffrey Wingrowich, 40, of Toronto, was arrested and charged with:

1) Assault

He is scheduled to appear in court at 1000 Finch Avenue West on Thursday, October 20, 2016, courtroom 306.

Peace Bridge Crosswalk on Memorial to Address Hundreds of Jaywalkers

Update: see previous post – March 28, 2012 City Examines New Bridge and Peace Bridge Crosswalk

Pam Tzeng is excited the city is building a new crosswalk on Memorial Drive at 9th Street, just west of the Peace Bridge.
Pam Tzeng is excited the city is building a new crosswalk on Memorial Drive at 9th Street, just west of the Peace Bridge. (Andrew Brown/CBC)

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New lights are being installed west of the busy pedestrian and bike bridge

Four years after the Peace Bridge opened, the city is installing a crosswalk and lights to the west of the span, allowing access across Memorial Drive at 9th Street.

“People don’t have to worry about crossing through the road where there are cars driving,” said city spokesperson Pooja Thakore. “Having the signal will make it much safer for people driving and walking, it’s a more predictable experience.”

She said an average of 200 people jaywalk in that location every day.

Mixed reaction

Pam Tzeng, who took advantage of a break in traffic to run across Memorial Drive on Saturday, is happy to hear about the lights.

“I’m super excited, I will no longer have to jaywalk,” she said with a laugh.

Not everyone is happy about the new lights, however.

“I think we have two walkways already and we don’t need a third walkway on Memorial Drive,” said Wendy Hansen.

“If people just obeyed the traffic signals that are there, that children already learn in Kindergarten, Grade 1, 2, 3…. We don’t need it.”

Construction on the project has already begun and is expected to be finished by the end of fall.