Ontario: Bicycle Safety

Update:

A bike must have a white front light and a red rear light or reflector if you ride between ½ hour before sunset and ½ hour after sunrise, and white reflective tape on the front forks and red reflective tape on rear forks. Cyclists riding bicycles without the required lights and reflectors will face fines between $60.00 and $500.00 up from the previous fine of $20.00..
A bike must have a white front light and a red rear light or reflector if you ride between ½ hour before sunset and ½ hour after sunrise, and white reflective tape on the front forks and red reflective tape on rear forks. Cyclists riding bicycles without the required lights and reflectors will face fines between $60.00 and $500.00 up from the previous fine of $20.00.

see source

Cycling guides

Learn more about safe cycling:

What is a bicycle?

A bicycle, or bike, is a vehicle that:

  • has one, two or three wheels (a unicycle, bicycle or tricycle)
  • has steering handlebars and pedals
  • does not have a motor. For motor-assisted bikes, read about electric bicycles or scooters and mopeds

Licence and registration

Bicycles do not require:

  • registration
  • licence plates
  • vehicle insurance
  • a driver’s licence

People of all ages can ride a bike.

Property of Ontario Motor Vehicle Tickets

Rules of the road

As a cyclist, you must share the road with others (e.g., cars, buses, trucks, motorcycles, etc.).

Under Ontario’s Highway Traffic Act (HTA), a bicycle is a vehicle, just like a car or truck.

Cyclists:

  • must obey all traffic laws
  • have the same rights and responsibilities as drivers
  • cannot carry passengers – if your bicycle is only meant for one person

Riding on the right

You must stay as close to the right edge of the road whenever possible, especially if you’re slower than other traffic.

Where you can ride

You can ride on most roads, except:

  • controlled access highways, such as Ontario’s 400-series highways
  • across a road within a pedestrian cross-over – you must walk your bike to the other side, you cannot ride within a pedestrian cross-over.
Cyclists should be able to move around the City and arrive home without incident. In case there is an accident, it is important for cyclist's to wear helmets that will protect their heads in the event of a fall.
Cyclists should be able to move around the City and arrive home without incident. In case there is an accident, it is important for cyclist’s to wear safe and approved cyclist’s helmets that will protect their heads in the event of a fall.

Bike helmets

Children and youth

Bicycle helmet

By law, every cyclist under age 18 must wear an approved helmet.

Riders under 16 years old: a parent or guardian must make sure their child wears a helmet.

Adults

Helmets are not compulsory for adults over 18; but a helmet can greatly reduce the risk of permanent injury or death if you fall or collide. It is strongly recommended that all riders wear helmets.

Types of helmets

The best helmets:

  • are made to meet strict safety standards
  • fit properly when worn correctly

Bicycle safety resources

For more information about cycling safety, check out:

Frequently Asked Questions

Bicycle Helmets

Q1: What is the fine for not wearing a bicycle helmet?

All bicycle riders under the age of 18 need to wear an approved bicycle helmet when travelling on any public road. The total fine is $75.

Q2: How do I know which bicycle helmet to buy?

Look for a helmet that fits comfortably and meets safety standards. Check the inside of the helmet for stickers from one or more of the following organizations:

  • Canadian Standard Association: CAN/CSA D113.2-M89
  • Snell Memorial Foundation: Snell B90, Snell B95, Snell B90S, or Snell N94
  • American National Standard Institute: ANSI Z90.4-1984
  • American Society For Testing and Materials: ASTMF1447-94
  • British Standards Institute: BS6863:1989
  • Standards Association of Australia: AS2063.2-1990
  • United States Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) 16 CFR Part 1203

New Cycling Changes

Q1: What are the new cycling changes following the passing of Bill 31- Transportation Statute Law Amendment Act (Making Ontario’s Roads Safer), 2015

Effective September 1, 2015

  • All drivers of motor vehicles are required to maintain a minimum distance of one-metre, where practical, when passing cyclists on highways;
  • Persons who improperly open or leave opened the doors of motor vehicles on highways face increased penalties (commonly known as “dooring”).
  • The fine for non-compliance with bicycle light, reflector and reflective requirements will increase; and
  • Cyclists are permitted to use lamps that produce intermittent flashes of red light.

New One-Metre Passing Law

Q1: What is the penalty to drivers for not leaving a minimum of one-metre distance when passing a cyclist?

The penalty for not leaving a minimum one-metre passing distance is a set fine of $85.00 plus a $5 court fee plus a $20 victim surcharge fine for a total payable of $110.00.

Drivers who contest their ticket by going to court may face a fine of up to $500 if found guilty (fine range is $60 to $500). Upon conviction, two demerit points will also be assigned against the individual’s driver record.

Q2: Will cyclists also be required to leave a minimum one-metre distance when passing a vehicle?

Cyclists are not required to leave a specific one-metre space; however, they are required to obey all the rules of the road.   Cyclists who are being overtaken should turn out to the right to allow the vehicle to pass.

Q3: What if there isn’t enough room to allow for a one-metre passing distance?  Can a vehicle cross the centre median line to pass the cyclist?

A motorist may, if done safely, and in compliance with the rules of the road, cross the centre line of a roadway in order to pass a cyclist. If this cannot be done, he or she must wait behind the cyclist until it is safe to pass.


Dooring. Cyclists have to be more cautious in high traffic areas, especially while passing parked vehicles.
Dooring.
Cyclists have to be more cautious in high traffic areas, especially while passing parked vehicles.

Dooring

Q1. What are the new increased penalties for “dooring” offenses?

The new penalties for improper opening of a vehicle door (for driver or passenger) are a set fine of $300.00 upon conviction and 3 demerit points. The total payable fine is $365.00 ($set fine plus $60 victim fine surcharge and $5 court costs).

The current HTA set fine for “dooring” offence is $85.00 upon conviction and the total payable fine is $110 ($set fine plus $20 victim fine surcharge and $5 court fees). Additionally a conviction results in 2 demerit points being added to the individual’s driver record.

Q2. Does the “dooring” law only apply to cyclists?

Although cyclists may be the most commonly perceived road user affected by this behaviour, the “dooring” law applies to all road users and is not specific to cyclists.

The government is committed to helping ensure the safety of not only cyclists but all road users.


Increasing the Fine for Cyclists for Non-Compliance with Light, Reflector and Reflective Material Requirements

Q1. Why is the government increasing the fines for cyclists with improper light, reflector and reflective tape?

Currently, the fine for non-compliance with bicycle light, reflector and reflective requirements, carries a maximum fine of $20 which is less than the majority of set fines for motorists and cyclists.

Increasing this fine will put this violation in line with all other cycling violations.


Allowing Cyclists to use Intermittent Flashing Red Lights

Q1. Why is the government allowing cyclists to use a red flashing light? Won’t this be distracting to other road users?

Red flashing lights were previously not allowed under the Highway Traffic Act even though the majority of cyclists were already using rear lamps that produce intermittent flashes of red lightto make themselves more visible to others.

Considering the safety benefits from the use of these lights, and to prevent cyclists from potentially being charged, the Highway Traffic Act was amended to allow bicycles to use lamps that produce intermittent flashes of red lights.

A motorist may, if done safely, and in compliance with the rules of the road, cross the centre line of a roadway in order to pass a cyclist. If this cannot be done, he or she must wait behind the cyclist until it is safe to pass. 


Recommended for you

Ontario: Harsher Penalties Called for Driver’s that Injure or Kill Pedestrians and Cyclists

Update:

The coalition pushing for a vulnerable road user law is composed of United Senior Citizens of Ontario, Kids at Play, Cycle Toronto, Walk Toronto and others. It is also recommending more licence suspensions, driver education and community service.
The coalition pushing for a vulnerable road user law is composed of United Senior Citizens of Ontario, Kids at Play, Cycle Toronto, Walk Toronto and others. It is also recommending more licence suspensions, driver education and community service.

see source

A group of lawyers and advocates is calling for tougher penalties when drivers kill or injure pedestrians and cyclists.

There will be food and extended family. There will even be cake.

But David Stark and his three boys, aged 6 to 12, will end the day on Thursday by scattering some of the ashes of their beloved wife and mother on what would have been her 43rd birthday.

First, however, Erica Stark’s grieving husband will join other survivors and a coalition of advocacy groups at a downtown press conference calling on the Ontario government to levy harsher penalties on drivers who injure or kill pedestrians and cyclists.

On Nov. 6, Erica dropped her car off for a routine oil change. She also wanted the winter tires installed.

“There wasn’t a hint of snow in the forecast, but that’s just who Erica was. Very organized, safety conscious, she wanted to have winter tires put on before the first snowfall arrived,” said David Stark on Wednesday.

Erica, who helped train service dogs, decided to take her four-legged companion for a walk while she waited. She was near Midland Ave. and Gild Dr., when a van mounted the curb and killed her, placing Erica on the list of 78 pedestrians and cyclists who have died on Toronto roads in the past two years.

David Stark says the penalty for careless driving under Section 130 of the Ontario Highway Traffic Act — $400 to $2,000 and a maximum jail sentence of six months — is “woefully inadequate.” He wants tougher deterrents.

“What would be fair would be $50,000. If people knew that if they chose to look at their cellphone or read a message while driving and it results in severely injuring someone or killing someone, that careless driving charge should come with a $50,000 fine. If people have to take out a loan or re-mortgage their home, so be it,” he said.

Drivers should also have to appear in court for victim impact statements, Stark said.

“As it is right now, people who are charged never have to set foot in court. They can be represented by a lawyer or their agent.”

Stark said listening to the victims’ families is “part of being accountable, listening to the impact of their action, their decision to do something stupid while driving.”

The coalition pushing for a vulnerable road user law is composed of United Senior Citizens of Ontario, Kids at Play, Cycle Toronto, Walk Toronto and others. It is also recommending more licence suspensions, driver education and community service.

Drivers who hit pedestrians and cyclists are frequently not charged or have their charges reduced, according to advocates and lawyers.

“The mindset is still one that, where there is no intention to do harm, then ‘it’s just an accident’. We believe this attitude must change among police, prosecutors and judges,” said Albert Koehl, a lawyer and cycling advocate.

Two Ontario coroner’s reviews in 2012 called such deaths “preventable” and not merely “accidents,” said Koehl.

The coalition isn’t primarily concerned with punishing offenders, he said, but rather with sending a strong message to drivers “that before they get behind the wheel of a car, before they text while driving, or open a door into traffic, or drive 60 km/h in a 40 km/h zone, they will think twice.”

Tougher law is a natural extension of the coroner’s recommendations, said Patrick Brown, a personal injury lawyer who, like Koehl, worked on those reports. New York, Illinois and Oregon have already introduced such laws and other states are considering them.

“The injury and death toll this year tell us we need it here. We need additional deterrence to provide safe passage to these vulnerable road users. When I see the fines that have been given out in cases where I represent the families and survivors, the penalties are ridiculously low,” he said.

Stark won’t speculate on what caused the driver to lose control of the van that killed his wife, and the case is still before the courts.

While they wait for an outcome, the Stark boys, Dylan, Gavin and Matthew, are seeing a grief counsellor.

“I feel they’re bottling up some of their emotions. That may be to protect themselves because it’s too painful,” said their dad.

“They may also be bottling things up because they want to protect me; they don’t want me to feel too sad.”

Cycling and Pedestrian Deaths

25%: Canadian traffic fatalities involving vulnerable road users

30%: Cycling deaths caused by speeding drivers, according to the Ontario Coroner’s 2010 report

28%: Cycling deaths caused by driver inattention

7: Motorists that died on Toronto roads in 2013

40: Pedestrians that died on Toronto roads in 1990 and 2013

2: Cyclists that died on Toronto roads in 1990

4: Cyclists that died on Toronto roads in 2013

67: per cent of pedestrians

$85: Fine for riding a bike on the sidewalk

$85: Fine for driver who hit Toronto cyclist Ryan Carriere in 2005

Toronto: City will Grapple With UberX and Lowering Taxi Fares

Update:

Toronto City Hall where City Council meets to conduct Council meetings. As of July 2010, taxis have a meter drop fare of $4.25 to start your ride, with an additional $0.25 for every following 0.143 km (about two blocks) or for every 29 seconds waiting time. In addition, there is an extra charge for more than 4 passengers, $2.00 each additional person. HST (Harmonized Sales Tax) is included in the fare. Tomorrow, City Council will meet and determine if the Taxi drop fare of $4.25 should be lowered by a dollar to $3.25, amongst other changes.
Toronto City Hall (Nathan Philips Square) where City Council meets to conduct Council meetings.
As of July 2010, taxis have a meter drop fare of $4.25 to start your ride, with an additional $0.25 for every following 0.143 km (about two blocks) or for every 29 seconds waiting time. In addition, there is an extra charge for more than 4 passengers, $2.00 each additional person. HST (Harmonized Sales Tax) is included in the fare.
Tomorrow, City Council will meet and determine if the Taxi drop fare of $4.25 should be lowered by a dollar to $3.25, amongst other changes.

see source

City staff are proposing new rules to regulate UberX in Toronto and recommending that cab flat fees drop $1, to $3.25, to help the beleaguered taxi industry compete with the ride-hailing company, the Star has learned.

The recommendations are included in a new report by the municipal licensing and standards division, which earlier this year tried unsuccessfully to shut down Uber’s operations with a court injunction, arguing that public safety was at risk.

The taxi industry says the UberX service, which allows passengers to hire regular drivers using a smartphone app — usually at prices cheaper than a taxi — has caused a dramatic drop in fare revenue. The City has been issuing tickets to UBER driver's under section 39 of the Highway Traffic Act, that carries a minimum fine of $300.
The taxi industry says the UberX service, which allows passengers to hire regular drivers using a smartphone app — usually at prices cheaper than a taxi — has caused a dramatic drop in fare revenue. The City has been issuing tickets to UBER driver’s under section 39 of the Highway Traffic Act, that carries a minimum fine of $300.

City council voted in July to review the existing bylaws and to recommend changes to ensure the taxi business and Uber are on a level playing field.

The taxi industry says the UberX service, which allows passengers to hire regular drivers using a smartphone app — usually at prices cheaper than a taxi — has caused a dramatic drop in fare revenue.

Major Taxi Companies (Brokerages) in Toronto
 Name Colour of Cars  Telephone Number
 Beck Orange/Green 416-751-5555
 Maple Leaf Blue With White Stripe 416-465-5555
 CO-OP Red/Yellow 416-504-2667
 Diamond Black/Orange 416-366-6868
 Royal Dark Blue 416-777-9222
 Crown Yellow 416-292-1212

After consulting with representatives from UberX and the taxi industry, licensing staff came up with draft proposals for council to consider, including the recommendation that the flat fee charged to passengers entering a cab in Toronto be lowered to $3.25 from $4.25. Mayor John Tory has said he supports lower taxi fares.

That rate has increased by nearly 40 per cent since 2005, when it was set at $3 following a spike in fuel costs. The introduction of the HST led to the last hike, in 2010. Toronto taxi fares are among the highest among North American peer cities, according to the Toronto Taxicab Industry Review final report.

Police have charged a number of UBER drivers under section 39 of the Highway Traffic Act, which carries a $300.00 fine upon conviction.
Police have charged a number of UberX drivers under section 39 of the Highway Traffic Act, which carries a $300.00 fine upon conviction. The taxi industry is complaining that UberX offers a basic fare of $2.50 (taxi’s start at $4.25) and charge for additonal time and kilometres and that to compete, the taxi meter drop fare of $4.25 should be lowered in order to compete with UberX.

In addition to a flat fee, cab riders are charged 25 cents for each additional 0.143 kilometre and 25 cents for each 29 seconds the meter is on but the taxi is not moving. Those charges would not change under the proposals, a source said.

The thrust of the other recommendations involves including Uber in a new bylaw with the creation of a new licensing category called Transportation Network Companies (TNC), a designation already in place in several U.S. cities, a source said.

It’s expected TNCs would be required to carry commercial liability insurance when a passenger is in the vehicle, pay an annual permit fee and conduct driver background checks. Details will be announced Wednesday.

Taxi companies have argued that UberX drivers are lawbreakers who get a free ride while licensed cabs are subject to heavy regulation and must bear additional costs such as licensing fees, insurance and maintenance.
Taxi companies have argued that UberX drivers are lawbreakers who get a free ride while licensed cabs are subject to heavy regulation and must bear additional costs such as licensing fees, insurance and maintenance.

Taxi companies have argued that UberX drivers are lawbreakers who get a free ride while licensed cabs are subject to heavy regulation and must bear additional costs such as licensing fees, insurance and maintenance.

Uber has argued it is a technology company that can’t be governed by the same rules that apply to the traditional taxi industry.

The city’s licensing committee will consider the Ground Transportation Review report next week. Council will have final approval.

Taxi drivers are feeling the financial crunch as they find themselves in competition with an interloper, who seem to ignore city bylaws and Provincial laws.
Taxi drivers are feeling the financial crunch as they find themselves in competition with an interloper, who seem to ignore city bylaws and Provincial laws.

OPP: Distracted Driving Down, Speeding/Racing, Impaired & Seatbelt Violations Up

Update:

OPP report that over the 2015 Labour Day Long Weekend charges are up for Impaired Driving, Racing, Speeding and Seatbelt Violations. Charges are down for distracted driving, although OPP report they laid 407 charges against inattentive drivers.
OPP report that over the 2015 Labour Day Long Weekend versus the 2014 Labour Day Long Weekend charges are up for Impaired Driving, Racing, Speeding and Seatbelt Violations. Charges are down for distracted driving, although OPP report they laid 407 charges against inattentive drivers.

see source

The number of charges laid on OPP-patrolled roads increased by 4% during the Labour Day long weekend compared to last year.

Charges increased for speeding, racing, impaired driving and seat belt infractions, police said.

“These long weekend statistics are alarming,” said Chief Supt. Chuck Cox of OPP traffic safety and operational support.

Labour Day Long Weekend – Traffic Charges Up in 2015 versus 2014

This is the difference in charges laid between the 2014 Labour Day Long Weekend and the 2015 Labour Day Long Weekend:

Distracted Driving (charges went down):

  • The number of charges laid in 2015 was down 38% from 2014

Speeding (charges went up):

The number of charges laid over the Labour Day Long Weekend 2015 was 464, compared to 459 in 2014. Progressive Conservative Premier Bill Davis was the first premier to bring this seatbelt law into Ontario, beginning on January 1, 1976.
The number of charges laid over the Labour Day Long Weekend 2015 was 464, compared to 459 in 2014. Progressive Conservative Premier Bill Davis was the first premier to bring this seatbelt law into Ontario, beginning on January 1, 1976.
  • The number of charges laid in 2015 was 5,494, compared to 4,974 in 2014.
  • The number of charges laid in 2015 for racing was 77, compared to 67 in 2014.

Impaired Driving (charges went up):

  • The number of charges laid in 2015 was 96, compared to 91 in 2014.

Seatbelt Violations (charges went up):

  • The number of charges laid in 2015 was 464, compared to 459 in 2014.

From the beginning of this year until Sept. 6, the number of collisions caused by distracted drivers has increased by 20% compared to the same period last year.

There were also two collisions this past weekend that resulted in four deaths on OPP-patrolled roadways, and alcohol was a factor in both collisions.OPP Cruiser pulling over vehicle

 

School’s Back – Keep the Community Safe

Update: see previous posts – Sept.1/15 Police To Enforce the Making Ontario’s Roads Safer Act, Bill 31 Starting Today, August 31, 2015 Ontario is Ready to Enforce Stiff Fines of up to $1,000 this Fall for Distracted Driving, June 3/15 New Ontario Road Laws Will Cost Ontarians Huge, June 2, 2015 Bill 31, Transportation Statute Law Amendment Act (Making Ontario’s Roads Safer), 2015 Receives Royal Assent

At least one parents is concerned moving some of the students to a St. John's school will mean younger kids spend too much time on a bus. Drivers failing to stop for a school bus can be fined up to $2,000 and six (6) demerit points for a first conviction. (Shutterstock)
At least one parent is concerned,  moving some of the students to a St. John’s school will mean younger kids will spend too much time on a bus.
Drivers failing to stop for a school bus can be fined up to $2,000 and six (6) demerit points for a first conviction. (Shutterstock)

see source

Toronto-area police are reminding drivers to be especially vigilant now that thousands of students are back at school — and back on the roads.

“We want to make sure that we are vigilant at all times when we are driving,” said Const. Thomas Ruttan of the Peel Regional Police.

Ruttan says drivers need to remember that kids don’t think like adults.

“They don’t drive so they don’t know what to expect from drivers. They’ve had a lot of experiences over the summer they want to share with their friends. They’re not paying attention to the roadway like we are paying attention or should be,” he said.

Misbehaving motorists will face higher fines under new Ontario laws that came into effect last month.

Drivers convicted of distracted driving now face a minimum fine of $490 and three demerit points with the maximum set at $1,000.

“I can think of a lot better things to spend my money on, that’s for sure,” Ruttan said. “Not to mention how dangerous it is, especially when children go to school.”

Police will also watching for proper stopping distances from school buses and crossing guard locations as well as speeding in school and community safety zones.

Motorists should also take care around kids going to and from school on bikes.

Ontario’s new laws also bring a minimum fine of $110 and two points to drivers who don’t leave at least one metre of space when possible when passing cyclists. Motorists who open their doors without looking, causing a cyclist to crash into them, now face a minimum fine of $365 and three demerit points.

Ontario’s New Road Rules that Became Effective Sept.1/15

School Buses:

 Under Making Ontario’s Roads Safer Act, Bill 31 School buses will be more recognizible — they will now be the only buses permitted to be chrome yellow. Drivers failing to stop for a school bus can be fined up to $2,000 and six demerit points for a first conviction.
Under Making Ontario’s Roads Safer Act, Bill 31 School buses will be more recognizible — they will now be the only buses permitted to be chrome yellow.
Drivers failing to stop for a school bus can be fined up to $2,000 and six demerit points for a first conviction.

A.  Distracted Driving:

Fines jump to between $300 to $1,000, from the current $60 to $500. The Fine increases from $280 to $490. Three (3) demerit points if convicted of a distracted driving offence. Distracted driving added to list of novice driver conditions. A novice licenced driver (without a full “G” drivers licence – with a G1,G2,M1,M2,M2-L or M2-M licence) will receive a minimum 30 day driving suspension for the first conviction and escalating sanctions for any subsequent convictions. That's still less than fines for distracted driving in P.E.I., the costliest in the country, which start at a $500 minimum and go to a maximum of $1,200, plus five demerit points. Drivers in Manitoba convicted of distracted driving will also get five demerit points, but the fine is lower at just $200.
Fines jump to between $300 to $1,000, from the current $60 to $500. The Fine increases from $280 to $490.
Three (3) demerit points if convicted of a distracted driving offence.
Distracted driving added to list of novice driver conditions. A novice licenced driver (without a full “G” drivers licence – with a G1,G2,M1,M2,M2-L or M2-M licence) will receive a minimum 30 day driving suspension for the first conviction and escalating sanctions for any subsequent convictions.
That’s still less than fines for distracted driving in P.E.I., the costliest in the country, which start at a $500 minimum and go to a maximum of $1,200, plus five demerit points. Drivers in Manitoba convicted of distracted driving will also get five demerit points, but the fine is lower at just $200.

B.  Pedestrian Cross Over/School Crossings:

Drivers must allow pedestrians to completely cross at a school and pedestrian crossing (and get off the road) before moving forward, current rules says driver must only yield half the crossing. Cyclists are not allowed to ride their bikes within the crosswalk. The fines for breaching this new amendment to the HTA is $150 and doubled in community safety zone to $300. This applies to pedestrians and to persons in wheelchair and streetcars that are approaching the crosswalk, in the crosswalk. It also applies to vehicles passing vehicles close to a crosswalk.
Drivers must allow pedestrians to completely cross at a school and pedestrian crossing (and completely get off the road) before moving forward, prior rules says driver must only yield half the crossing.
Cyclists are not allowed to ride their bikes within the crosswalk. The fines for breaching this new amendment to the HTA is $150 and doubled in community safety zones to $300. This applies to pedestrians and to persons in wheelchair and streetcars that are approaching the crosswalk or actually in the crosswalk. It also applies to vehicles passing vehicles/streetcars close (30 metres) to a crosswalk. Municipalities can now place more crosswalks on low-speed/volume roads.

C.  Opening any vehicle door and coming into contract with cyclists or vehicle, also known as “Dooring” or a “Door Prize”:

Property of Ontario Motor Vehicle Tickets

 Dooring: this involves the act of a driver or passenger opening a door, on either side of the vehicle, where a cyclist ends up coming into contact with that opened door. Either the driver or passenger can be charged. The Fault Determination Rules in Regulation 668 under the Insurance Act of Ontario finds that any driver or passenger that opens the door of the vehicle, on the driver’s side or passenger side is 100% responsible for any incident where a cyclist comes into contact with that door. Drivers convicted of “dooring” cyclists will now be fined $365 to $1000 (the previous minimum fines were $60 to $500), about double the current level and will also receive three (3) demerit points, up from the previous two (2) demerit points.
Dooring: this involves the act of a driver or passenger opening a door, on either side of the vehicle, where a cyclist ends up coming into contact with that opened door. Either the driver or passenger can be charged. The Fault Determination Rules in Regulation 668 under the Insurance Act of Ontario finds that any driver or passenger that opens the door of the vehicle, on the driver’s side or passenger side is 100% responsible for any incident where a cyclist comes into contact with that door.
Drivers convicted of “dooring” cyclists will now be fined $365 to $1000 (the previous minimum fine was $60 to $500), about double the current level and will also receive three (3) demerit points, up from the previous two (2) demerit points.

D.  Cyclists and their Bicycle Equipment:

A bike must have a white front light and a red rear light or reflector if you ride between ½ hour before sunset and ½ hour after sunrise, and white reflective tape on the front forks and red reflective tape on rear forks. Cyclists riding bicycles without the required lights and reflectors will face fines between $60.00 and $500.00 up from the previous fine of $20.00..
A bike must have a white front light and a red rear light or reflector if you ride between ½ hour before sunset and ½ hour after sunrise, and white reflective tape on the front forks and red reflective tape on rear forks. Cyclists riding bicycles without the required lights and reflectors will face fines between $60.00 and $500.00 up from the previous fine of $20.00. The fine is slightly higher than Alberta, where cyclists may face a fine of $100 for riding a bicycle at night, without lights. In Quebec, cyclists face a fine of $37 if their bicycles aren’t equipped with proper reflectors and cyclists may face a fine of $36 for riding a bicycle at night, without lights. Ontario cyclists will now be able to ride on paved shoulders (rather than the main lanes) on provincial highways, other than restricted-access highways, like the 401.

E.  Cyclists Must Now Be Provided 1 Metre/3.28084 Feet by Vehicles, When the Vehicle is Passing the Cyclist:

Drivers passing cyclists on the road will also have to keep at least one metre away from the cyclist, where practical. Motorists who do not respect a safe distance (1 Metre/3.28084 Feet) between their vehicle and the bicycle will be fined a minimum of $110 or $180 if the offence took place in a community safety zone. A conviction will result in the fine and the addition of two (2) demerit points to the motorist's driving record.
Drivers passing cyclists on the road will also have to keep at least one metre away from the cyclist, where practical. Motorists who do not respect a safe distance (1 Metre/3.28084 Feet) between their vehicle and the bicycle will be fined a minimum of $110 or $180 if the offence took place in a community safety zone. A conviction will result in the fine and the addition of two (2) demerit points to the motorist’s driving record.

F.  Tow Trucks. Motorists must slow down, and move over a lane, when tow trucks attend to roadside incidents and their amber lights are engaged.

Slow Down, Move Over requirement for motorists would apply to two trucks at side or roadside incidents when amber lights engaged, not just first responders like police. The minimum fine for failing to slow down and move over is $490. When there are accidents or vehicles needs to be removed from roads or highways, tow trucks become necessary and they want to do their jobs safely and return home safely after doing so.
Slow Down, Move Over requirement for motorists would apply to tow trucks at side or roadside incidents when amber lights engaged, not just first responders like police. The minimum fine for failing to slow down and move over is $490. When there are accidents or vehicles needs to be removed from roads or highways, tow trucks become necessary and they want to do their jobs safely and return home safely after doing so.

G.  Driver’s Licence can be used a valid photo identification, even after it has been revoked due to a medical condition, until it is formally reinstated:

The Ministry of Transportation (MOT) through the Medical Advisory Committee determine whether someone can continue to drive or not. If the Medical Advisory Committee determines that a driver poses a risk to others, that driver can have their licence immediately revoked. The MOT's Medical Advisory Committee has determined the following medical/mental conditions High risk conditions are conditions that are chronic, deteriorating, unstable or progressive such as Advanced dementia or Alzheimer's disease Uncontrolled seizures or diabetes Substance abuse, psychiatric disorders with symptoms of suicidal thoughts, extreme agitation, impulsive or violent behaviour etc. Uncontrolled sleep apnea refusing treatment Now, when a driver has lost his/her driving privileges in the past, the licence could not be maintained as a form or valid identification; that has now changed. The MOT will allow driver's who may be able to driver again in the future, to hold onto their driver's licence to be used as valid government photo identification. Low risk conditions are deemed to be those that do not pose an immediate or serious risk to road safety; conditions that are stable and/or temporary, such as Controlled sleep apnea Seizure occurring one year ago or more Controlled diabetes Heart disease Reactive depression Cast/splints Stable psychiatric disorders
The Ministry of Transportation (MOT) through the Medical Advisory Committee determine whether someone can continue to drive or not, based on medical/mental considerations. If the Medical Advisory Committee (MAC) determines that a driver poses a risk to others, that driver will have their licence immediately revoked via the Registrar of Motor Vehicles. IF the MAC determines that the medical/mental condition can stablize and is temporary (which do not pose as an immediate,  serious risk to road safety) then the licence can be reinstated,
Now, when a driver has lost his/her driving privileges in the past, the licence could not be maintained as a form or valid identification; that has now changed. The MOT will allow driver’s who may be able to driver again in the future, to hold onto their driver’s licence to be used as valid government photo identification. It would be useful in the Oct.19/15 Federal Election.

H.  Medically Unfit Drivers, Drivers with Medical Conditions:

Bill 31, Transportation Statute Law Amendment Act (Making Ontario's Roads Safer), 2015 strengthens mandatory and discretionary medical reporting requirements for conditions that impact driving ability. More medical professionals will be allowed to report conditions impacting driving. Most Canadian jurisdictions rely on the CMA guidelines Determining Medical Fitness to Drive: A Guide for Physicians (15) as a guide to determine when a driver’s license should be suspended and restored.
Bill 31, Transportation Statute Law Amendment Act (Making Ontario’s Roads Safer), 2015 strengthens mandatory and discretionary medical reporting requirements for conditions that impact driving ability. More medical professionals will be allowed to report conditions impacting driving.
Most Canadian jurisdictions rely on the CMA guidelines Determining Medical Fitness to Drive: A Guide for Physicians (15) as a guide to determine when a driver’s license should be suspended and restored.