Paralyzed man testifies in P.E.I. bike crash trial

Update: see previous post – June 14, 2016 Driver on trial for P.E.I. crash involving cyclist

Accused Jordan Arsenault-Loeman and cyclist Alan Stanley attended provincial court in Charlottetown Tuesday.
Accused Jordan Arsenault-Loeman and cyclist Alan Stanley attended provincial court in Charlottetown Tuesday. (CBC)

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Cyclist Alan Stanley said it was a ‘beautiful day’ before accident happened

Alan Stanley was seated in his wheelchair in the witness stand Wednesday as he testified in Charlottetown Provincial Court about the crash involving his bicycle and a car last August.

“It was a beautiful summer day,” he said as testimony began.  “We were near the end of the ride when it happened. We’d gone about 90 kilometres.”

Stanley was headed south on Brackley Point Road in Charlottetown with a group of about 20 or 30 cyclists on Aug. 1, 2015, when his bike collided with an on-coming car that was making a left turn.

Bicycle accident
The scene Aug. 1, 2015, on Brackley Point Road where cyclist Alan Stanley collided with a vehicle. (Charlottetown Police)

Jordan Arsenault-Loeman, 26, of Saint John, N.B., has pleaded not guilty to making an unsafe turn, under the Highway Traffic Act.

Often led the pack

Wednesday morning, a fellow cyclist testified Stanley was one of the fastest riders in their group, and often led the pack.

She also testified Stanley “broke the rules of the road” once in a while, such as exceeding the speed limit or going through stop signs.

Bicycle
Alan Stanley’s bicycle, foreground, after the crash on Aug. 1, 2015, that left him paralyzed. (Charlottetown Police)

“But only when there were no cars in sight and it was safe,” she testified.

The court also examined speed data downloaded from a GPS one of the cyclists had on his bike.

40 km per hour

That data shows the cyclists were coasting downhill at about 40 kilometres per hour just before the crash took place.

The speed limit was 50.

Drivers have testified traffic was heavy and moving slowly.

The cyclists were using the south-bound bike lane on Brackley Point Road.

Stanley has filed a civil suit against the driver.

The driver has filed a statement of defence claiming he is not at fault.

Driver on trial for P.E.I. crash involving cyclist

Update:

Accused Jordan Arsenault-Loeman, of N.B., and former cyclist Alan Stanley attended provincial court in Charlottetown Tuesday.
Accused Jordan Arsenault-Loeman, of N.B., and former cyclist Alan Stanley attended provincial court in Charlottetown Tuesday. (CBC)

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Paralyzed cyclist to testify at trial

A cyclist who was paralyzed after his bike and a car collided last year will testify at a two-day trial that started today in P.E.I. provincial court in Charlottetown.

Alan Stanley, 60, has been paralyzed since the crash on August 1, 2015 on Brackley Point Road in Charlottetown.

Stanley is among seven prosecution witnesses slated to testify at the trial of the car driver involved in the crash.

The driver, Jordan Arsenault-Loeman, of Saint John, N.B., has pleaded not guilty to making an unsafe turn, an infraction under the Highway Traffic Act.

The defence contends Arsenault-Loeman did no wrong — traffic was heavy and cars were moving slowly.

Stanley was with a group of 20 or 30 cyclists coming down a hill in the bike lane on Brackley Point Road, by the Sherwood Business Centre.

Arsenault-Loeman’s lawyer argues the bicycles were simply going too fast so his client can’t be at fault.

Witnesses testify

Two witnesses to the crash testified Tuesday morning, describing a scene of busy traffic that sunny Saturday afternoon.

Both testified the driver was in the northbound lane, and was making a left turn when the crash took place.

They testified the car was moving slowly.

“Nothing out of the ordinary,” one of them testified.

The cyclist was heading south in the bike lane on Brackley Point Road.

He was with several riders who were travelling next to the curb spread out at varying intervals, as one witness described it.

‘Knew it wasn’t good’

Under cross examination, the witnesses testified the bicycles were moving fast.

“I thought it must be a race,” one witness testified, “judging by their speed and how many there was.”

The other witness testified the bicycles were moving faster than the cars on the road.

“As the car made the left, I heard a crash,” one witness testified. “Then I saw the cyclist lying on his back. I knew it wasn’t good.”

The trial is scheduled to run two days.

Ontario: Highway 401 median saves road workers from flying truck wheel, OPP says

Update:

The OPP says two tires snapped off a tractor trailer on Highway 401 on Friday.
The OPP says two tires snapped off a tractor trailer on Highway 401 on Friday. (Screen Grab/OPP/Twitter)

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‘The tire would have probably taken out one of our road workers today’

A concrete median on Highway 401 in southern Ontario has been credited with saving a roadside worker from injury or possible death after a wheel flew through the air after becoming dislodged from a truck.

Two wheels flew off a westbound tractor-trailer on Friday afternoon near Veterans Memorial Parkway in London, Ont.

One tire bounced off into a field. But the other tire landed near the centre median “narrowly missing another worker on the highway,” said OPP Sgt. Dave Rektor in a post on Twitter.

“The tire would have probably taken out one of our road workers today. Fortunately the wall stopped the tire,” he said, broadcasting live on Twitter via the Periscope app.

You can view Sgt. Rektor’s video post below or by going here.

Police and Ontario’s Ministry of Transportation are investigating.

“This is just so dangerous. They can kill. If that hits a car at highway speeds, somebody’s going to die” Rektor said while inspecting the truck and looking over the tire investigators picked up.

“It’s becoming an all-too-familiar scene on our highways.”

In January, a 69-year-old Burlington, Ont., man died in hospital, hours after his vehicle was crushed by a wheel that flew off of a transport truck on Highway 400 near King Road.

In September 2015, a Brampton, Ont., woman died after she was hit by a flying wheel that dislodged from a dump truck in nearby Mississauga.

Alberta: Banff launches Traffic Dashboard to battle gridlock on roads

Update:

https://i.ytimg.com/vi/UdwD0-VbIiI/maxresdefault.jpg
On the busiest day last summer, 28,000 vehicles went through the area.

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Summer traffic is like ‘New York City in rush hour’

Banff has created an online tool to help visitors and residents navigate traffic congestion that’s getting worse every year.

The town’s ‘Traffic Dashboard’ provides live traffic cameras and estimated travel times to various locations in the popular tourist town.

Residents have long complained of gridlock on the roads — especially in the busy summer season and on long weekends.

“Basically New York City in rush hour at Times Square,” is how Louis J. Normand sums it up. “You’ve got wall-to-wall of cars on both ways the whole main street.”

Mayor Karen Sorensen says officials have been trying to reduce traffic by offering more public transit and free shuttles, but as the number of tourists go up, so do the traffic tie ups.

The new Traffic Dashboard shows estimated travel times across the bridge, among other things, and is meant to alert visitors and residents so they can plan ahead.

“It will allow our visitors and our residents to make informed decisions before they head out,” Sorensen told CBC News.

But some like Jesse Shaw say he’s not sure it would help.

“It would take more time to look at it, then get on my bike and just go. I mean for people that are just coming here and they’re fresh and don’t know where they’re going, I guess that would be helpful.”

Victoria Day long weekend impaired driving charges at 159 by Monday morning

Update:

Ontario Provincial Police have had a busy long weekend on the roads, laying numerous impaired-driving, dangerous-driving and stunt-driving charges.
Ontario Provincial Police have had a busy long weekend on the roads, laying numerous impaired-driving, dangerous-driving and stunt-driving charges. photo by fightyourtickets.ca

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Ontario Provincial Police expect charges to rise as drivers hit the roads for the drive home

Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) cruiser. photo by fightyourtickets.ca
Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) cruiser. photo by fightyourtickets.ca

Ontario Provincial Police have laid 159 impaired-driving charges so far this long weekend as drivers have hit the road for their long-weekend getaways.

In addition to the impaired-driving charges, police have pulled 25 cars off the road for stunt-driving, and laid another 16 dangerous driving charges, Sgt. Kerry Schmidt told CBC News.

Schmidt said he expects those numbers to rise as cottagers return to the roadways for what will likely be a long drive home.

“Don’t be in a rush,” he advised Monday morning.

“Take your time and realize that it will take longer to get home and just don’t take chances.”

photo by fightyourtickets.ca
photo by fightyourtickets.ca