Wheel Flies Off Mississauga Dump Truck, Woman Critically Injured

Update:

Victim was struck while walking on Meadowvale Boulevard in Mississauga, north of Highway 401

see source

A woman is fighting for her life after being struck by one of two wheels that flew off a dump truck in Mississauga this morning.

The woman, said to be in her 40s, was walking on the sidewalk of Meadowvale Boulevard, just north of Highway 401, around 8 a.m. when she was struck by the wheel — which likely weighed nearly 200 pounds — according to police.

Diane Tsialtas, of Brampton, was identified by friends as the victim of the accident. Tsialtas, an avid runner, is well-known among that community.

She was airlifted to Sunnybrook Hospital with life-threatening injuries and remains in critical condition.

Flying truck tires are also punishable by fines of up to $50,000. The law puts “absolute liability” on the truck operator, meaning charged drivers cannot use a due diligence defence. The only defence would be to prove the wheel did not separate from the truck. In 1996, a year before the law was introduced, the GTA had more fatalities involving trucks than the national average due to higher traffic volume. That year, there were 32 incidents involving truck tires, injuring 19 people and killing two. Two others were killed in 1995, and in 2006, an Oakville mother of two died in a collision caused by a runaway truck tire.
Flying truck tires are also punishable by fines of up to $50,000. The law puts “absolute liability” on the truck operator, meaning charged drivers cannot use a due diligence defence. The only defence would be to prove the wheel did not separate from the truck.
In 1996, a year before the law was introduced, the GTA had more fatalities involving trucks than the national average due to higher traffic volume. That year, there were 32 incidents involving truck tires, injuring 19 people and killing two. Two others were killed in 1995, and in 2006, an Oakville mother of two died in a collision caused by a runaway truck tire.

Peel Regional Police still haven’t determined how the tires came loose from the 14-wheel truck.

John Furlano, a truck technician who does safety checks on commercial vehicles including dump trucks, said he believes the nuts that hold the tire in place were loose after looking at pictures of the truck involved.

“That would cause the rim itself to rock back and forth,” Furlano said, adding that’s something the driver should have detected during his daily check over the vehicle.

“He should have heard something coming from that wheel and maybe stopped and circled the truck.”

Police are questioning the driver but haven’t laid any charges at this time.

“It looks like due to the negligent condition of the dump truck the tire flew off and struck a pedestrian who was walking on the sidewalk,” said Const. Rachel Gibbs of Peel Regional Police.

After hitting the woman, one wheel bounced about 200 metres into the parking lot of an office building. It’s not clear how fast the truck was moving at the time the wheels came loose.

Flying Truck Wheel Fatalities in Ontario

Dec. 11, 2011: Jason Eligh, 24, is killed heading eastbound on Highway 401 just west of Brockville when a westbound truck loses a dual rear wheel set from its trailer. Eligh was a father of two sons from Mallorytown, Ont.

Nov. 14, 2003: A wheel assembly flies off a tractor-trailer on the 401 at Waverly Rd. near Bowmanville and smashes into the windshield of a Ford Focus, killing Sylvie Theoret, 40, instantly. Her 15-year-old son suffers minor injuries. A driver of a Pontiac Sunfire also suffers injuries when the flying tire bounces off Theoret’s car and then hits his car. Section 84.1 of the Highway Traffic Act that imposes fines of up to $50,000 on trucking companies when a wheel separates from a vehicle does not apply when the entire axle, hub, wheel and tire assembly comes off.

July 28, 2001: John Drysdale, 51, is killed instantly on Highway 401 in Durham Region when the wheel of a truck detaches, bounces of a centre guardrail and smashes through the windshield of his 1996 van. The truck company is charged with operating an unsafe vehicle and having a wheel fall off. The truck is impounded and its plates removed after the rig is deemed unsafe. The truck’s driver is charged with failing to maintain a proper log book and failing to conduct a proper pre-trip inspection. No criminal charges are laid against the truck driver.

July 1997: Shane Perry, 22, dies after his pickup truck hits a trailer wheel lying in his path on Highway 400 north of Rutherford Rd.

Dec. 28, 1996: Mary Louise Jessiman, 40, and her mother, Robina Campbell, 58, of Mississauga, are killed on Highway 401 near Oshawa by a set of wheels that fly off a truck. The trucker, Louis Lauzon, is later fined $5,500 after being found guilty of driving an overweight commercial vehicle and failing to ensure a commercial vehicle conformed to standards.

April 3, 1995: James Tyrrell, 31, of Mississauga, dies when a wheel falls off a transport truck. The wheel bounces over a guardrail and smashes into his Toyota as he heads in the opposite direction along the QEW near Highway 10 in Mississauga. An inquest is held in October 1995 in response to the deaths of both Worona and Tyrrell. The 17-day inquest concludes that in both accidents the wheels that flew off and killed the victims had been poorly maintained and improperly installed. The inquest led Ontario to introduce North America’s toughest laws for the trucking industry. They include increased fines and putting unsafe transport trucks in compounds known as truck jails for a minimum of 15 days. Laws enacted in 1997 set fines of between $2,000 to $50,000 for truck-related offences.

Jan 31, 1995: Angela Worona, 31, of Whitby dies when a truck wheel bounces over the guardrail and smashes into her Pontiac Grand Am as she was driving in the opposite direction along Highway 401 in Whitby.

Ontario: Bicycle Safety

Update:

A bike must have a white front light and a red rear light or reflector if you ride between ½ hour before sunset and ½ hour after sunrise, and white reflective tape on the front forks and red reflective tape on rear forks. Cyclists riding bicycles without the required lights and reflectors will face fines between $60.00 and $500.00 up from the previous fine of $20.00..
A bike must have a white front light and a red rear light or reflector if you ride between ½ hour before sunset and ½ hour after sunrise, and white reflective tape on the front forks and red reflective tape on rear forks. Cyclists riding bicycles without the required lights and reflectors will face fines between $60.00 and $500.00 up from the previous fine of $20.00.

see source

Cycling guides

Learn more about safe cycling:

What is a bicycle?

A bicycle, or bike, is a vehicle that:

  • has one, two or three wheels (a unicycle, bicycle or tricycle)
  • has steering handlebars and pedals
  • does not have a motor. For motor-assisted bikes, read about electric bicycles or scooters and mopeds

Licence and registration

Bicycles do not require:

  • registration
  • licence plates
  • vehicle insurance
  • a driver’s licence

People of all ages can ride a bike.

Property of Ontario Motor Vehicle Tickets

Rules of the road

As a cyclist, you must share the road with others (e.g., cars, buses, trucks, motorcycles, etc.).

Under Ontario’s Highway Traffic Act (HTA), a bicycle is a vehicle, just like a car or truck.

Cyclists:

  • must obey all traffic laws
  • have the same rights and responsibilities as drivers
  • cannot carry passengers – if your bicycle is only meant for one person

Riding on the right

You must stay as close to the right edge of the road whenever possible, especially if you’re slower than other traffic.

Where you can ride

You can ride on most roads, except:

  • controlled access highways, such as Ontario’s 400-series highways
  • across a road within a pedestrian cross-over – you must walk your bike to the other side, you cannot ride within a pedestrian cross-over.
Cyclists should be able to move around the City and arrive home without incident. In case there is an accident, it is important for cyclist's to wear helmets that will protect their heads in the event of a fall.
Cyclists should be able to move around the City and arrive home without incident. In case there is an accident, it is important for cyclist’s to wear safe and approved cyclist’s helmets that will protect their heads in the event of a fall.

Bike helmets

Children and youth

Bicycle helmet

By law, every cyclist under age 18 must wear an approved helmet.

Riders under 16 years old: a parent or guardian must make sure their child wears a helmet.

Adults

Helmets are not compulsory for adults over 18; but a helmet can greatly reduce the risk of permanent injury or death if you fall or collide. It is strongly recommended that all riders wear helmets.

Types of helmets

The best helmets:

  • are made to meet strict safety standards
  • fit properly when worn correctly

Bicycle safety resources

For more information about cycling safety, check out:

Frequently Asked Questions

Bicycle Helmets

Q1: What is the fine for not wearing a bicycle helmet?

All bicycle riders under the age of 18 need to wear an approved bicycle helmet when travelling on any public road. The total fine is $75.

Q2: How do I know which bicycle helmet to buy?

Look for a helmet that fits comfortably and meets safety standards. Check the inside of the helmet for stickers from one or more of the following organizations:

  • Canadian Standard Association: CAN/CSA D113.2-M89
  • Snell Memorial Foundation: Snell B90, Snell B95, Snell B90S, or Snell N94
  • American National Standard Institute: ANSI Z90.4-1984
  • American Society For Testing and Materials: ASTMF1447-94
  • British Standards Institute: BS6863:1989
  • Standards Association of Australia: AS2063.2-1990
  • United States Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) 16 CFR Part 1203

New Cycling Changes

Q1: What are the new cycling changes following the passing of Bill 31- Transportation Statute Law Amendment Act (Making Ontario’s Roads Safer), 2015

Effective September 1, 2015

  • All drivers of motor vehicles are required to maintain a minimum distance of one-metre, where practical, when passing cyclists on highways;
  • Persons who improperly open or leave opened the doors of motor vehicles on highways face increased penalties (commonly known as “dooring”).
  • The fine for non-compliance with bicycle light, reflector and reflective requirements will increase; and
  • Cyclists are permitted to use lamps that produce intermittent flashes of red light.

New One-Metre Passing Law

Q1: What is the penalty to drivers for not leaving a minimum of one-metre distance when passing a cyclist?

The penalty for not leaving a minimum one-metre passing distance is a set fine of $85.00 plus a $5 court fee plus a $20 victim surcharge fine for a total payable of $110.00.

Drivers who contest their ticket by going to court may face a fine of up to $500 if found guilty (fine range is $60 to $500). Upon conviction, two demerit points will also be assigned against the individual’s driver record.

Q2: Will cyclists also be required to leave a minimum one-metre distance when passing a vehicle?

Cyclists are not required to leave a specific one-metre space; however, they are required to obey all the rules of the road.   Cyclists who are being overtaken should turn out to the right to allow the vehicle to pass.

Q3: What if there isn’t enough room to allow for a one-metre passing distance?  Can a vehicle cross the centre median line to pass the cyclist?

A motorist may, if done safely, and in compliance with the rules of the road, cross the centre line of a roadway in order to pass a cyclist. If this cannot be done, he or she must wait behind the cyclist until it is safe to pass.


Dooring. Cyclists have to be more cautious in high traffic areas, especially while passing parked vehicles.
Dooring.
Cyclists have to be more cautious in high traffic areas, especially while passing parked vehicles.

Dooring

Q1. What are the new increased penalties for “dooring” offenses?

The new penalties for improper opening of a vehicle door (for driver or passenger) are a set fine of $300.00 upon conviction and 3 demerit points. The total payable fine is $365.00 ($set fine plus $60 victim fine surcharge and $5 court costs).

The current HTA set fine for “dooring” offence is $85.00 upon conviction and the total payable fine is $110 ($set fine plus $20 victim fine surcharge and $5 court fees). Additionally a conviction results in 2 demerit points being added to the individual’s driver record.

Q2. Does the “dooring” law only apply to cyclists?

Although cyclists may be the most commonly perceived road user affected by this behaviour, the “dooring” law applies to all road users and is not specific to cyclists.

The government is committed to helping ensure the safety of not only cyclists but all road users.


Increasing the Fine for Cyclists for Non-Compliance with Light, Reflector and Reflective Material Requirements

Q1. Why is the government increasing the fines for cyclists with improper light, reflector and reflective tape?

Currently, the fine for non-compliance with bicycle light, reflector and reflective requirements, carries a maximum fine of $20 which is less than the majority of set fines for motorists and cyclists.

Increasing this fine will put this violation in line with all other cycling violations.


Allowing Cyclists to use Intermittent Flashing Red Lights

Q1. Why is the government allowing cyclists to use a red flashing light? Won’t this be distracting to other road users?

Red flashing lights were previously not allowed under the Highway Traffic Act even though the majority of cyclists were already using rear lamps that produce intermittent flashes of red lightto make themselves more visible to others.

Considering the safety benefits from the use of these lights, and to prevent cyclists from potentially being charged, the Highway Traffic Act was amended to allow bicycles to use lamps that produce intermittent flashes of red lights.

A motorist may, if done safely, and in compliance with the rules of the road, cross the centre line of a roadway in order to pass a cyclist. If this cannot be done, he or she must wait behind the cyclist until it is safe to pass. 


Recommended for you

School’s Back – Keep the Community Safe

Update: see previous posts – Sept.1/15 Police To Enforce the Making Ontario’s Roads Safer Act, Bill 31 Starting Today, August 31, 2015 Ontario is Ready to Enforce Stiff Fines of up to $1,000 this Fall for Distracted Driving, June 3/15 New Ontario Road Laws Will Cost Ontarians Huge, June 2, 2015 Bill 31, Transportation Statute Law Amendment Act (Making Ontario’s Roads Safer), 2015 Receives Royal Assent

At least one parents is concerned moving some of the students to a St. John's school will mean younger kids spend too much time on a bus. Drivers failing to stop for a school bus can be fined up to $2,000 and six (6) demerit points for a first conviction. (Shutterstock)
At least one parent is concerned,  moving some of the students to a St. John’s school will mean younger kids will spend too much time on a bus.
Drivers failing to stop for a school bus can be fined up to $2,000 and six (6) demerit points for a first conviction. (Shutterstock)

see source

Toronto-area police are reminding drivers to be especially vigilant now that thousands of students are back at school — and back on the roads.

“We want to make sure that we are vigilant at all times when we are driving,” said Const. Thomas Ruttan of the Peel Regional Police.

Ruttan says drivers need to remember that kids don’t think like adults.

“They don’t drive so they don’t know what to expect from drivers. They’ve had a lot of experiences over the summer they want to share with their friends. They’re not paying attention to the roadway like we are paying attention or should be,” he said.

Misbehaving motorists will face higher fines under new Ontario laws that came into effect last month.

Drivers convicted of distracted driving now face a minimum fine of $490 and three demerit points with the maximum set at $1,000.

“I can think of a lot better things to spend my money on, that’s for sure,” Ruttan said. “Not to mention how dangerous it is, especially when children go to school.”

Police will also watching for proper stopping distances from school buses and crossing guard locations as well as speeding in school and community safety zones.

Motorists should also take care around kids going to and from school on bikes.

Ontario’s new laws also bring a minimum fine of $110 and two points to drivers who don’t leave at least one metre of space when possible when passing cyclists. Motorists who open their doors without looking, causing a cyclist to crash into them, now face a minimum fine of $365 and three demerit points.

Ontario’s New Road Rules that Became Effective Sept.1/15

School Buses:

 Under Making Ontario’s Roads Safer Act, Bill 31 School buses will be more recognizible — they will now be the only buses permitted to be chrome yellow. Drivers failing to stop for a school bus can be fined up to $2,000 and six demerit points for a first conviction.
Under Making Ontario’s Roads Safer Act, Bill 31 School buses will be more recognizible — they will now be the only buses permitted to be chrome yellow.
Drivers failing to stop for a school bus can be fined up to $2,000 and six demerit points for a first conviction.

A.  Distracted Driving:

Fines jump to between $300 to $1,000, from the current $60 to $500. The Fine increases from $280 to $490. Three (3) demerit points if convicted of a distracted driving offence. Distracted driving added to list of novice driver conditions. A novice licenced driver (without a full “G” drivers licence – with a G1,G2,M1,M2,M2-L or M2-M licence) will receive a minimum 30 day driving suspension for the first conviction and escalating sanctions for any subsequent convictions. That's still less than fines for distracted driving in P.E.I., the costliest in the country, which start at a $500 minimum and go to a maximum of $1,200, plus five demerit points. Drivers in Manitoba convicted of distracted driving will also get five demerit points, but the fine is lower at just $200.
Fines jump to between $300 to $1,000, from the current $60 to $500. The Fine increases from $280 to $490.
Three (3) demerit points if convicted of a distracted driving offence.
Distracted driving added to list of novice driver conditions. A novice licenced driver (without a full “G” drivers licence – with a G1,G2,M1,M2,M2-L or M2-M licence) will receive a minimum 30 day driving suspension for the first conviction and escalating sanctions for any subsequent convictions.
That’s still less than fines for distracted driving in P.E.I., the costliest in the country, which start at a $500 minimum and go to a maximum of $1,200, plus five demerit points. Drivers in Manitoba convicted of distracted driving will also get five demerit points, but the fine is lower at just $200.

B.  Pedestrian Cross Over/School Crossings:

Drivers must allow pedestrians to completely cross at a school and pedestrian crossing (and get off the road) before moving forward, current rules says driver must only yield half the crossing. Cyclists are not allowed to ride their bikes within the crosswalk. The fines for breaching this new amendment to the HTA is $150 and doubled in community safety zone to $300. This applies to pedestrians and to persons in wheelchair and streetcars that are approaching the crosswalk, in the crosswalk. It also applies to vehicles passing vehicles close to a crosswalk.
Drivers must allow pedestrians to completely cross at a school and pedestrian crossing (and completely get off the road) before moving forward, prior rules says driver must only yield half the crossing.
Cyclists are not allowed to ride their bikes within the crosswalk. The fines for breaching this new amendment to the HTA is $150 and doubled in community safety zones to $300. This applies to pedestrians and to persons in wheelchair and streetcars that are approaching the crosswalk or actually in the crosswalk. It also applies to vehicles passing vehicles/streetcars close (30 metres) to a crosswalk. Municipalities can now place more crosswalks on low-speed/volume roads.

C.  Opening any vehicle door and coming into contract with cyclists or vehicle, also known as “Dooring” or a “Door Prize”:

Property of Ontario Motor Vehicle Tickets

 Dooring: this involves the act of a driver or passenger opening a door, on either side of the vehicle, where a cyclist ends up coming into contact with that opened door. Either the driver or passenger can be charged. The Fault Determination Rules in Regulation 668 under the Insurance Act of Ontario finds that any driver or passenger that opens the door of the vehicle, on the driver’s side or passenger side is 100% responsible for any incident where a cyclist comes into contact with that door. Drivers convicted of “dooring” cyclists will now be fined $365 to $1000 (the previous minimum fines were $60 to $500), about double the current level and will also receive three (3) demerit points, up from the previous two (2) demerit points.
Dooring: this involves the act of a driver or passenger opening a door, on either side of the vehicle, where a cyclist ends up coming into contact with that opened door. Either the driver or passenger can be charged. The Fault Determination Rules in Regulation 668 under the Insurance Act of Ontario finds that any driver or passenger that opens the door of the vehicle, on the driver’s side or passenger side is 100% responsible for any incident where a cyclist comes into contact with that door.
Drivers convicted of “dooring” cyclists will now be fined $365 to $1000 (the previous minimum fine was $60 to $500), about double the current level and will also receive three (3) demerit points, up from the previous two (2) demerit points.

D.  Cyclists and their Bicycle Equipment:

A bike must have a white front light and a red rear light or reflector if you ride between ½ hour before sunset and ½ hour after sunrise, and white reflective tape on the front forks and red reflective tape on rear forks. Cyclists riding bicycles without the required lights and reflectors will face fines between $60.00 and $500.00 up from the previous fine of $20.00..
A bike must have a white front light and a red rear light or reflector if you ride between ½ hour before sunset and ½ hour after sunrise, and white reflective tape on the front forks and red reflective tape on rear forks. Cyclists riding bicycles without the required lights and reflectors will face fines between $60.00 and $500.00 up from the previous fine of $20.00. The fine is slightly higher than Alberta, where cyclists may face a fine of $100 for riding a bicycle at night, without lights. In Quebec, cyclists face a fine of $37 if their bicycles aren’t equipped with proper reflectors and cyclists may face a fine of $36 for riding a bicycle at night, without lights. Ontario cyclists will now be able to ride on paved shoulders (rather than the main lanes) on provincial highways, other than restricted-access highways, like the 401.

E.  Cyclists Must Now Be Provided 1 Metre/3.28084 Feet by Vehicles, When the Vehicle is Passing the Cyclist:

Drivers passing cyclists on the road will also have to keep at least one metre away from the cyclist, where practical. Motorists who do not respect a safe distance (1 Metre/3.28084 Feet) between their vehicle and the bicycle will be fined a minimum of $110 or $180 if the offence took place in a community safety zone. A conviction will result in the fine and the addition of two (2) demerit points to the motorist's driving record.
Drivers passing cyclists on the road will also have to keep at least one metre away from the cyclist, where practical. Motorists who do not respect a safe distance (1 Metre/3.28084 Feet) between their vehicle and the bicycle will be fined a minimum of $110 or $180 if the offence took place in a community safety zone. A conviction will result in the fine and the addition of two (2) demerit points to the motorist’s driving record.

F.  Tow Trucks. Motorists must slow down, and move over a lane, when tow trucks attend to roadside incidents and their amber lights are engaged.

Slow Down, Move Over requirement for motorists would apply to two trucks at side or roadside incidents when amber lights engaged, not just first responders like police. The minimum fine for failing to slow down and move over is $490. When there are accidents or vehicles needs to be removed from roads or highways, tow trucks become necessary and they want to do their jobs safely and return home safely after doing so.
Slow Down, Move Over requirement for motorists would apply to tow trucks at side or roadside incidents when amber lights engaged, not just first responders like police. The minimum fine for failing to slow down and move over is $490. When there are accidents or vehicles needs to be removed from roads or highways, tow trucks become necessary and they want to do their jobs safely and return home safely after doing so.

G.  Driver’s Licence can be used a valid photo identification, even after it has been revoked due to a medical condition, until it is formally reinstated:

The Ministry of Transportation (MOT) through the Medical Advisory Committee determine whether someone can continue to drive or not. If the Medical Advisory Committee determines that a driver poses a risk to others, that driver can have their licence immediately revoked. The MOT's Medical Advisory Committee has determined the following medical/mental conditions High risk conditions are conditions that are chronic, deteriorating, unstable or progressive such as Advanced dementia or Alzheimer's disease Uncontrolled seizures or diabetes Substance abuse, psychiatric disorders with symptoms of suicidal thoughts, extreme agitation, impulsive or violent behaviour etc. Uncontrolled sleep apnea refusing treatment Now, when a driver has lost his/her driving privileges in the past, the licence could not be maintained as a form or valid identification; that has now changed. The MOT will allow driver's who may be able to driver again in the future, to hold onto their driver's licence to be used as valid government photo identification. Low risk conditions are deemed to be those that do not pose an immediate or serious risk to road safety; conditions that are stable and/or temporary, such as Controlled sleep apnea Seizure occurring one year ago or more Controlled diabetes Heart disease Reactive depression Cast/splints Stable psychiatric disorders
The Ministry of Transportation (MOT) through the Medical Advisory Committee determine whether someone can continue to drive or not, based on medical/mental considerations. If the Medical Advisory Committee (MAC) determines that a driver poses a risk to others, that driver will have their licence immediately revoked via the Registrar of Motor Vehicles. IF the MAC determines that the medical/mental condition can stablize and is temporary (which do not pose as an immediate,  serious risk to road safety) then the licence can be reinstated,
Now, when a driver has lost his/her driving privileges in the past, the licence could not be maintained as a form or valid identification; that has now changed. The MOT will allow driver’s who may be able to driver again in the future, to hold onto their driver’s licence to be used as valid government photo identification. It would be useful in the Oct.19/15 Federal Election.

H.  Medically Unfit Drivers, Drivers with Medical Conditions:

Bill 31, Transportation Statute Law Amendment Act (Making Ontario's Roads Safer), 2015 strengthens mandatory and discretionary medical reporting requirements for conditions that impact driving ability. More medical professionals will be allowed to report conditions impacting driving. Most Canadian jurisdictions rely on the CMA guidelines Determining Medical Fitness to Drive: A Guide for Physicians (15) as a guide to determine when a driver’s license should be suspended and restored.
Bill 31, Transportation Statute Law Amendment Act (Making Ontario’s Roads Safer), 2015 strengthens mandatory and discretionary medical reporting requirements for conditions that impact driving ability. More medical professionals will be allowed to report conditions impacting driving.
Most Canadian jurisdictions rely on the CMA guidelines Determining Medical Fitness to Drive: A Guide for Physicians (15) as a guide to determine when a driver’s license should be suspended and restored.

Iqaluit: Residents Concerned about Pedestrian Safety after Traffic Influx

Update: see previous posts – August 15/15 Iqaluit: Iqaluit Teen Struck by Vehicle, July 31/15 Iqaluit: Road Safety Concerns Raised in Iqaluit after 4-Year-Old Boy Killed, July 21/15 Iqaluit: No Charges Laid in Iqaluit Crash that Sent 2 Young Girls to Hospital

Pedestrians crossing the busy four-corners intersection in downtown Iqaluit. Photo by CBC
Pedestrians crossing the busy four-corners intersection in downtown Iqaluit. (CBC)

‘We need to come up with a solution before a child gets hit,’ says resident Steven Lonsdale

see source

A traffic influx in Iqaluit has some residents sounding off about pedestrian safety again.

With the start of the school season, there are more cars on the road and many people say they’re seeing drivers rolling through stop signs, or just plain ignoring them.

“I’ve observed it throughout the day, it could be 10 in the morning or it could be 10 at night,” says Iqaluit resident Steven Lonsdale, who lives near the four-way stop in the Plateau.

“I don’t want to fear for my child’s life every time I send them out the door.”

Lonsdale shared his concerns on Facebook, and residents from other parts of town quickly chimed in with stories of close-calls.

“It happens at the Apex four-way, as well as the tundra subdivision and other parts of town,” Lonsdale says.

“There are places in the city that I feel are unsafe,” says resident Allen Auksaq.

Allen Auksaq Iqaluit resident

Iqaluit resident Allen Auksaq says there are places in the city that he feels are unsafe. (CBC)

“One place is near the boarding home, because there are medical patients from other communities trying to cross to the hospital, and people don’t stop.”

Another resident, Andrew Cameron, says pedestrians also need to start paying attention.

“Honestly, people also walk out wherever they want without looking.”

The city says citizens should write down license plate numbers and report violators to municipal enforcement.

“We will investigate the incident and the witness will have to testify in court,” says Kevin Sloboda, Chief Enforcement Officer.

“People don’t have manners in this city, they just don’t care. A few years ago there was a child who got run over, and that could happen again,” says Israel Mablick, another resident.

‘We need to come up with a solution before a child gets hit’

This isn’t the first time residents have raised concerns about street safety in Iqaluit. In 2013, a 4-year-old boy died after he was hit by a truck at the four corners near Arctic Ventures Marketplace. One year later two girls were hit on the same stretch of road. The incidents lead to calls for better-marked crosswalks in the city.

RCMP spokesperson Yvonne Niego says motorists need to be more cautious, especially when they’re driving in areas with children.

“The bus stops are unmarked and sometimes it can be very difficult to see the children behind the posts and while they’re playing,” Niego says.

Lonsdale says it’s only a matter of time before there’s another tragedy.

“We need to come up with a solution before a child gets hit.”

B.C.: Cyclist Who Slides Under Truck Lives to Tell the Tale

Update:

Ladislav Cumpelik and what remains of the shorts that helped save his life. (CBC)
Ladislav Cumpelik and what remains of the shorts that helped save his life. (CBC)

see source

There’s Tom Cruise, Bruce Willis and Arnold Schwarzenegger and now there’s… Ladislav Cumpelik?

Cumpelik is the B.C. cyclist who against all odds survived when his morning commute went from Mission: Impossible to Die Hard.

A lot of stuff was going through my brain… ‘Is this my last journey?’ – Ladislav Cumpelik, cyclist

The 37-year-old Saanich man says he was riding to work on Thursday, coming down a steep hill along West Saanich Road, when a flatbed semi-trailer truck sailed right out in front of him.

Cumpelik desperately slammed on the brakes, but it was too late. He lost control of the bike, hit the road hard and was rapidly sliding between the truck’s wheels.

“My front tire went from underneath me, I started skidding on my back and behind, and I noticed…I didn’t have enough speed to go underneath the truck and through to the other side.”

All hope seemed lost.

‘I had a death grip on’

But what happened next was like a scene from an action movie.

“I grabbed on to his brake line and held on tight and started screaming.”

Sliding along the road, underneath a moving truck, Cumpelik was hanging on for dear life.

“A lot of stuff was going through my brain… ‘Is this my last journey?’ … And I was just screaming at the top of my lungs… I had a death grip on.”

Police say Cumpelik was dragged half a kilometre at an estimated 50 km/h before the truck stopped, after another motorist who witnessed the incident sped up alongside the trailer, honking and yelling.

Nothing short of a ‘miracle’

When emergency responders arrived, they found a man, battered, bruised and broken — but amazingly, alive. Saanich Police Const. Paul Cain described it as nothing short of a “miracle.”

“I’ve been doing this job for over 27 years and that was the first time I have ever seen anything like that,” said Cain.

Cumpelik is now recovering in hospital, having suffered some cuts, bruises, broken ribs, a broken shoulder and what he happily describes as “road rash.”

This isn’t the first time Cumpelik has had a lucky escape.

Last year, he says, he had another close call while out cycling. And when he was two years old, his mother says, he drowned, but was revived by his father.

“He’s our miracle baby… He’ll be bruised and he’ll remember this for a while, but I’m really glad he’s with us,” she said tearfully.

B.C.’s new action hero says he feels like Indiana Jones — but it isn’t something he’ll be doing again.

“It was a thrill ride, I’m glad I didn’t have to pay for it. It was certainly an interesting journey,” said Cumpelik.

“But I don’t wish it on anybody.”

Ladislav Cumpelik and parents Markyta and Ferdinand Cumpelik

Ladislav Cumpelik with his (very relieved) parents Markyta and Ferdinand Cumpelik. (CBC)