23-Year-Old Impaired Driver Sentenced to Seven (7) Years Following Cyclist’s Death

Update:

23-year-old Darya Selinevich was sentenced to seven (7) years today, after her drinking and driving on June 11, 2015 resulted in the death of 44-year-old cyclist Zhi Yong Kang. Kang left behind his 15-year-old son. photo by fightyourtickets.ca

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A 23-year-old repeat drunk driver who killed a Toronto cyclist and fled police at 200 km-h was sent to jail Wednesday.

Darya Selinevich, a former highly regarded law clerk and aspiring paralegal, appeared stoic as a judge sentenced her to seven years, reduced to four and a half years in acknowledgment of time already spent in jail since the June 11, 2015 crash that killed Zhi Yong Kang, the 44-year-old father of a 15-year-old boy.

Just one month before drinking heavily and slamming a BMW into Kang at almost double the speed limit, as he pedaled along Finch Ave. W., Selinevich had received a one-year-driving ban for speeding with double the legal limit of alcohol in her system — intoxication so severe she passed out at a police station.

After leaving Kang dying on the ground shortly after midnight, Selinevich raced through the residential neighbourhood, swerved around a police car and ran a red light before pulling into a strip mall and fleeing from the car which kept moving with locked doors.

At the time of her arrest, the Richmond Hill woman’s social media accounts glorified drinking and driving with photos of a wine bottle in a car, a speedometer at 202.5 km-h and a R.I.D.E. poster with her added joke that ride-home options, in addition to a bus, cab, police car or ambulance, were “option 5, my car.”

Yulian Liao, Kang’s ex-wife and the mom of their son, sobbed quietly as Justice Leslie Pringle described the crash in grisly detail before sentencing Selinevich for her admitted crimes of impaired driving causing death, failing to stop at the scene and for police, refusing to provide a breath sample and driving while disqualified.

Just one month before drinking heavily and slamming a BMW into Kang at almost double the speed limit, as he pedaled along Finch Ave. W., Selinevich had received a one-year-driving ban for speeding with double the legal limit of alcohol in her system — intoxication so severe she passed out at a police station. photo by fightyourtickets.ca

The jail term came as pedestrians and cyclists are dying on Toronto streets at an alarming rate, and safety advocates demand legal reforms in hopes of saving lives and reflecting the toll drivers can take.

In many cases drivers who are at fault when they kill someone, but not drunk and do not flee, receive a fine of $1,000 or less under provincial traffic laws rather than face Criminal Code sanctions like Selinevich.

Det.-Const. Arthur Lane of Toronto police traffic services said outside court the Kang family remains “devastated” but he is satisfied with the jail term.

“In previous years we’ve had low sentences and so I’m glad to see that the sentences now are starting to move up in duration,” Lane said. “Society’s looking at these cases in a more serious light and that’s going to be helpful.

“The public should know that this kind of activity is absolutely abhorrent . . .”

Darya Selinevich, 23, has received a jail sentence for the June 2015 crash that killed cyclist Zhi Yong Kang, 44, on Finch Ave. W. at Tobermory Dr. Selinevich, had previously been convicted of drunk driving.
23-year-old Darya Selinevich. (FACEBOOK)

Court heard Kang was exceptionally smart, graduated from “the Harvard of China” before moving to Canada, had a “maverick” personality and played sports and cycled with his beloved son.

Dong Kang said in a victim impact statement he was “deeply hurt” by his younger brother’s violent death and has struggled with depression and other health problems since the crash shortly after their father’s death.

Still, in her statement, Kang’s ex-wife said the family hopes the young woman one day achieves her dream of becoming a paralegal and has the same strong family supports as the cyclist she killed.

“Above all, we hope she has more patience in whatever she might do in the future,” Liao wrote. “We would like her to know we are immensely comforted by our family and friends surrounding us.”

Court heard Selinevich, originally from Russia, dropped York University law and society studies after a co-op placement led to a job as a law clerk/legal assistant. In a letter to court a former employer described her as intelligent and trustworthy.

But she ran with “high risk” friends and binge drank, especially after the deaths of four friends within two years, court heard. She is now a model prisoner, studying life skills, substance abuse, international business and, by correspondence, “dozens of bible studies” with an average of 95.9 per cent.

Selinevich did not address the court, saying “Yes” quietly when the judge asked if she understood her sentence.

“You are clearly someone who is intelligent, you are clearly someone who has the potential to learn from the horrendous crimes that have been committed in this case,” the judge said. “Good luck.”

 

TTC – Fare Prices Rise in 2017

Update:

TTC Streetcar stopped at intersection with passengers boarding and exiting. photo by fightyourtickets.ca

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2017 TTC Fare Increase

On Monday, November 21, the TTC Board approved a fare increase to take effect on January 1, 2017.

The Board approved a 10 cent increase to the cost of a token and PRESTO e-purse, as well as a $4.75 increase to the cost of a Metropass. Senior/Student fares (cash and tickets) will increase by 10 cents. The cost of a Day Pass will increase to $12.50 and Downtown Express Stickers will increase to $43.00.

The TTC Board also voted to freeze the current price of adult cash fares.

Adult2016 fareCurrent new fare
CashCurrent fare is $3.25New fare is the same, $3.25
TokenCurrent fare is $2.90New fare has changed to $3.00
PRESTO E-PurseCurrent fare is $2.90New fare has changed to $3.00
Weekly PassCurrent fare is $42.25New fare has changed to $43.75
Regular MetropassCurrent fare is $141.50New fare has changed to $146.25
VIP Tier 1 (50-249)Current fare is $127.25New fare has changed to $131.75
VIP Tier 2 (250-499)Current fare is $125.75New fare has changed to $130.25
VIP Tier 3 (500+)Current fare is $124.50New fare has changed to $128.75
MDPCurrent fare is $129.75New fare has changed to $134.00
Post Secondary MetropassCurrent fare is $112.00New fare has changed to $116.75
Senior/StudentCurrent FareNew Fare
CashCurrent fare is $2.00New fare has changed to $2.10
TicketCurrent fare is $1.95New fare has changed to $2.05
PRESTO E-PurseCurrent fare is $1.95New fare has changed to $2.05
Weekly PassCurrent fare is $33.00New fare has changed to $34.75
Regular MetropassCurrent fare is $112.00New fare has changed to$116.75
MDPCurrent fare is $102.75New fare has changed to $107.00

Children 12 years of age and under continue to ride free.

Other Fares2016 fareCurrent new fare
Day Pass/Group/Family Pass/E-TicketCurrent fare is $12.00New fare has changed to $12.50
GTA Weekly PassCurrent fare is $61.00New fare has changed to $63.00
Downtown Express StickerCurrent fare is $41.50New fare will change to $43.00

 

Pass Vending Machines

Located in select Subway Stations, the Pass Vending Machine offers a variety of passes for purchase by credit card and debit card.

  • Monthly Metropasses passes are sold starting the 24th of the month prior to the month they are valid.
  • Weekly passes are sold from the previous Thursday, until the Tuesday of the week for which the pass will be used.
  • The Pass Vending Machine (PVM) accepts payment by debit card and credit card (Visa, Mastercard, or American Express).
  • Some subway stations have more than one PVM; the passes sold in each PVM may differ and are subject to availability.
Pass Vending Machine – Sales Locations and Pass Types

Bathurst

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Bay

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College

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Davisville

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Don Mills

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Downsview

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Dundas

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Eglinton

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Finch

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Islington

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Kennedy

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King

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Kipling

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Main Street

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North York Centre

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Queen

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Scarborough Centre

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Sheppard-Yonge

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Sherbourne

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St Patrick

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Union

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Warden

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York Mills

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Driver who ran red light and killed cyclist sentenced to 2 years in jail

Update:

Displaying IMG_2626.JPG
The intersection was shut down after Adrian Dudzicki, 23 was hit by Aleksev. Photo by fightyourtickets.ca

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Aleksey Aleksev, 23, was convicted of criminal negligence causing death earlier this year

Adrian Dudzicki, 23, was cycling to squash practice on the morning he was killed by a driver who recklessly sped through a red light at an intersection in North York.

The now 23-year-old driver, Aleksey Aleksev, was sentenced Wednesday to a jail term of two years less a day, three years of probation and a ban on driving for 15 years.

Earlier this year Superior Court Justice Gary Trotter found Aleksev guilty of dangerous driving causing death, criminal negligence causing death and, unusually, manslaughter.

However, in his Wednesday ruling, Trotter said he would be sentencing Aleksev on the count of criminal negligence causing death and staying the two other convictions since the law prohibits a person from being convicted on multiple counts for the same offence.

He stressed that his decision to sentence Aleksev for criminal negligence causing death rather than manslaughter made no difference to the sentence and does not diminish the severity of the crime or the devastation to Dudzicki’s family.

Trotter noted that this case did not involve alcohol or drugs; Aleksev claimed he was distracted by adjusting the heating or the radio shortly before the November 2013 crash.

“This case is a sad reminder of the devastation that can be caused by the egregious conduct of a sober driver,” Trotter said.

He referred to the many victim impact statements submitted by Dudzicki’s family and friends, quoting the words of his parents.

“My life will never be the same again. He was all I had,” his mother Ewa Dudzicka told the court.

“There is just emptiness,” his father Jaroslaw Dudzicki said. “There is no hope.”

After the ruling, Jaroslaw Dudzicki said he had been hoping the court process would lead to closure, but he still has many unanswered questions.

Among them, what responsibility Aleksev’s parents carry for allowing their son to continue driving recklessly. Aleksev had a history of driving infractions, including speeding tickets, court heard.

“How did he get behind the wheel?” Dudzicki said.

Peace Bridge Crosswalk on Memorial to Address Hundreds of Jaywalkers

Update: see previous post – March 28, 2012 City Examines New Bridge and Peace Bridge Crosswalk

Pam Tzeng is excited the city is building a new crosswalk on Memorial Drive at 9th Street, just west of the Peace Bridge.
Pam Tzeng is excited the city is building a new crosswalk on Memorial Drive at 9th Street, just west of the Peace Bridge. (Andrew Brown/CBC)

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New lights are being installed west of the busy pedestrian and bike bridge

Four years after the Peace Bridge opened, the city is installing a crosswalk and lights to the west of the span, allowing access across Memorial Drive at 9th Street.

“People don’t have to worry about crossing through the road where there are cars driving,” said city spokesperson Pooja Thakore. “Having the signal will make it much safer for people driving and walking, it’s a more predictable experience.”

She said an average of 200 people jaywalk in that location every day.

Mixed reaction

Pam Tzeng, who took advantage of a break in traffic to run across Memorial Drive on Saturday, is happy to hear about the lights.

“I’m super excited, I will no longer have to jaywalk,” she said with a laugh.

Not everyone is happy about the new lights, however.

“I think we have two walkways already and we don’t need a third walkway on Memorial Drive,” said Wendy Hansen.

“If people just obeyed the traffic signals that are there, that children already learn in Kindergarten, Grade 1, 2, 3…. We don’t need it.”

Construction on the project has already begun and is expected to be finished by the end of fall.

Toronto: Police Give Away Free Noggin Shells to Young Cyclists

Update:

http://fightyourtickets.ca/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/20101113_611.jpg
If a parent or guardian allows a young cyclist (under the age of 16 years old) to ride a bicycle, without wearing a proper helmet, the parent or guardian who should have been supervising the child, can be charged under section 104 (2.2) of the Highway Traffic Act. This carries with it a $60.00 set fine. On top of the fine, there is a victim fine surcharge of $15.00, as well as the court cost of $5.00. photo by fightyourtickets.ca

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The giveaway is part of a broader effort by two officers to boost safety and bridge rifts between cops and community in Lawrence Heights.

Mugdaba Ullah, 4, can’t believe his luck. First training wheels on his “supercycle,” now a flashy, fire-toned helmet.

“Two peez gave me a bicycle hat,” he says, busting out his nickname for “police.”

“Mine has Snow White and Cinderella,” notes his sister Nagina, 5.

The two “peez” pals, Constables Mir Lodhi and Wayne Clarke, have been giving bike helmets to kids around the Lawrence Heights area where they walk the beat as neighbourhood officers. Launching the effort last month after seeing scores of tike bikers without headgear, the duo has doled out more than a dozen helmets to boost safety and bridge old rifts on streets where distrust of law enforcement lingers.

Some determined young cyclists look ready to take on the Ossington Criterium bike race on Saturday.
Children on their bicycles. Children must wear helmets to ensure their safety. CBC

Two factors lie behind the dearth of noggin shells, Lodhi says: cash and awareness.

“It’s mostly financial. They can’t afford to go out and spend 30 or 40 bucks,” he says of families in a neighbourhood identified by the city as a “priority area” until 2013.

Education plays a role, too. Whenever Lodhi and Clarke ask young cyclists where their helmet is, “They’re either shocked or they didn’t know they had to have one.”

http://fightyourtickets.ca/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/Bicycle-Toronto-Mounted-unit-Officers-pull-over-and-investigate-cyclists.jpg
Toronto police stopping and questioning cyclists. photo by fightyourtickets.ca

A city bylaw requires all cyclists under 18 to wear a helmet.

“We just explain — to the kid and to the mom or the dad — how unsafe it is to ride without protection, and that it’s the law,” says Clarke.

The pilot project, launched informally by Clarke and Lodhi last month, complements other efforts such as taking kids for a ride-along to buy a slushy, or co-ordinating a makeover between teens and a Yonge St. aesthetician.

Lodhi arrived in Lawrence Heights in the fall of 2013 to help spearhead the Toronto Police Service’s new neighbourhood officer program to help heal “50 years of mutual distrust between police and the community.”

Less than three years later, he and Clarke are ambling along the streets, bouncing basketballs back and forth with children and razzing tweens.

http://fightyourtickets.ca/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/P4243937_7122.jpg
Metropolitan Toronto Police Headquarters. Police hope by giving away freebies to the youngsters in the neighbourhood they can build trust and good faith. photo by fightyourtickets.ca

“Looking good on those blades, Romario,” Lodhi says. “Yeah, but D’Andre’s getting cocky with his skills on the court,” Clarke chirps.

Lodhi says the effort has led to healthier relationships and heightened safety, as well as tips that have helped resolve crimes.

“We realize that we may not be able to work with certain people that already have their minds made up, but we want to work with the next generation, and this is how we get them.”

While helmets are critical, infrastructure such as segregated bike lanes and lower speed limits can prevent injuries and save more lives, says Pat Brown, a road safety advocate and head of Bike Law Canada.

“Even at slow speed, slight contact with someone who’s cycling can mean death,” Brown said. “Cycling shouldn’t be considered a contact sport.”

Last year, the city imposed lower speed limits on hundreds of kilometres of residential streets downtown and in East York in a bid to improve safety for pedestrians and cyclists. Meanwhile, bike lanes await installation in a Bloor St. pilot project going into gear by the end of the summer.

Toronto police have faced criticism recently for apparent victim-blaming in fatal cycling accidents.

https://scontent.cdninstagram.com/t51.2885-15/s320x320/e15/11376129_837117423036191_1096721216_n.jpg?ig_cache_key=MTAwNTY3MDg0NjU0MDMyMzU4MA%3D%3D.2
Toronto police constable Clinton Stibbe. Prior to entering the force, he was a class “a” mechanic and very involved in the car culture. He is now the voice/face of Toronto police’s Traffic Services’ Media Relations.

On July 5, spokesman Const. Clinton Stibbe told reporters a biker pedalling at a high speed did not “approach the area with enough care,” resulting in the 71-year-old’s death near the intersection of Christie St. and Dupont St. Stibbe apologized over Twitter for his remark the next day, noting the cyclist had the right of way.

“Historically, we’ve seen a tendency to look at the cyclist or pedestrian first, and second at the driver. We think that comes across as a form of victim-blaming and sends the wrong message to the public,” said Brown.

He noted police are “active participants with safety and cycling, especially with the younger generation.”