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Update:

The City of Winnipeg claims that resident Brenda Franz's vehicle was ticketed with a $50 parking ticket in 2005 when she worked downtown. But she didn't know about it until recently, when the city sent her a letter. The city says there are no statute of limitations on parking fines and it can collect on them any time.

The City of Winnipeg claims that resident Brenda Franz’s vehicle was ticketed with a $50 parking ticket in 2005 when she worked downtown. But she didn’t know about it until recently, when the city sent her a letter.

see source

A Winnipeg woman wants to know why it took eight years for the city to tell her she had an unpaid parking ticket.

Brenda Franz got the $50 ticket in 2005 when she worked downtown. But she didn’t know about it until recently, when the city sent her a letter.

The city says there are no statute of limitations on parking fines and it can collect on them any time. This is true if Ms. Franz doesn't dispute the parking ticket; if she does dispute it she can rely upon provisions of the Charter, specifically section 11(b) and section 24 and make an application for a stay of proceedings, arguing prejudice citing the substantial delay in the matter.

The city says there are no statute of limitations on parking fines and it can collect on them any time. This may be true if Ms. Franz doesn’t dispute the parking ticket; if she does dispute it she can rely upon provisions of the Charter, specifically section 11(b) and section 24 and make an application for a stay of proceedings, arguing prejudice citing the substantial delay in the matter.

The city says there are no statute of limitations on parking fines and it can collect on them any time.

As for why it took so long, the city said it’s because Franz changed her name when she got married in 2010. And the parking authority only recently updated its system with that information.

Franz now has 15 days to decide if she will pay the fine or fight it in court.

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Update:

Glen Murray, Ontario's Transportation Minister said for example the GO train trip from Danforth to Union stations will take nine minutes as opposed to 28 minutes by TTC, and 18 minutes from Kennedy to Union stations or almost 20 minutes less than by the TTC.

Glen Murray, Ontario’s Transportation Minister said for example the GO train trip from Danforth to Union stations will take nine minutes as opposed to 28 minutes by TTC, and 18 minutes from Kennedy to Union stations or almost 20 minutes less than by the TTC.

see source

Within a decade commuters will be travelling on GO trains powered by electricity and they will only have to wait 15 minutes for one to show up, Transportation Minister Glen Murray says.

Inside a train maintenance centre in Etobicoke on Thursday, Murray, along with Premier Kathleen Wynne, promised a regional express system in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton and area and beyond that will dramatically cut existing commute times.

It is all part of the minority Liberal government prebudget rollout and adds details to an announcement earlier this week where Wynne pledged $29 billion in dedicated transit funds. The budget is May 1 , and if it falls on a confidence vote, an election would come shortly after it.

“This trains running all days in both directions every 15 minutes. This competes now with the standards set in Paris, London in the United Kingdom and gives us 15-minute rapid rail service all across every corner of the GTHA (Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area),” Murray told reporters.

“This will double the ridership of GO over the next decade,” he said.

GO released a $4-million study in 2011 that put the cost of electrifying the Georgetown and Lakeshore lines at about $1.8 billion. Metrolinx anticipates that GO’s ridership of about 65 million trips a year will have doubled by 2031.

Murray said for example the GO train trip from Danforth to Union stations will take nine minutes as opposed to 28 minutes by TTC, and 18 minutes from Kennedy to Union stations or almost 20 minutes less than by the TTC.

Right now train runs every half-hour only on the Lakeshore line.

Wynne said it is a priority for her government to improve transit into Toronto’s downtown core.

“When I think about the convenience we are aspiring to, it’s the notion that you could show up at a station knowing that within the next 10 to 15 minutes there is going to be a train come by,” she said.

“This is about commuters, it is about congestion on the roads and it’s about convenience and helping people in their lives,” she said.

Murray explained the system will gradually be transitioning from diesels into electric multiple-unit vehicles, which he says, can move much more quickly, noting the Lakeshore line would probably be done first.

“We brought in a team from the U.K. and we consulted with our friends in France and they describe this as a regional surface subway because it is that kind of frequency,” he said.

The minister said it is hoped that with increased ridership there will a decrease in provincial subsidy for the GO service.

The new transit fund is expected to reallocate $1.2 billion of the $2.39 billion the province collects in gasoline taxes as well as another $130 million from the HST the government collects on gas and diesel fuel.

“We know there is an economic imperative to get this right and make sure that people can move around this region and beyond and that’s why we are making this investment,” Wynne said.

“We must continue to upgrade this system. Otherwise we are not going to have the economic prosperity that we need and we know we are capable of,” she said.

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Update:

The nine victims who have died so far this year in collisions where lack of proper restraint was cited as a causal factor range from 21 to 64 years of age. The OPP recognizes that seat belt non-compliance is largely related to attitude rather than age.

The nine victims who have died so far this year in collisions where lack of proper restraint was cited as a causal factor range from 21 to 64 years of age. The OPP recognizes that seat belt non-compliance is largely related to attitude rather than age.

see source

ORILLIA, ON, April 14, 2014 /CNW/ – Occupant restraint will be the OPP’s main traffic focus over the Easter Long Weekend. Officers are urging those few non-compliant drivers and passengers who continue to put themselves and others at risk to buckle up every time they drive. They are asking the motoring public to work with them to keep 2014 seat belt related deaths, currently sitting at nine in OPP jurisdiction, from rising.

Road users should expect to see much higher volumes of traffic over the weekend, making it a particularly important weekend for all drivers, passengers and young children to be properly restrained, regardless of how short a trip people are taking.

The nine victims who have died so far this year in collisions where lack of proper restraint was cited as a causal factor range from 21 to 64 years of age. The OPP recognizes that seat belt non-compliance is largely related to attitude rather than age.

“Young drivers tend to get a bad rap when it comes to seat belt
compliance. We are seeing more young drivers than ever buckling up and taking the risks associated with lack of restraint very seriously early on in their driving years. These healthy attitudes paint a positive outlook for seat belt safety on our roads, but those few non-compliant drivers should follow their example”. – OPP Deputy Commissioner Brad Blair, Provincial Commander for Traffic Safety and Operational Support.

“The OPP is very proud that Ontarians have a generally high compliance rate with seat belt laws, but there are still a handful of people who need to adopt the same voluntary compliance mindset as the majority of road users. Driving is a privilege, but is too often thought of as a right.  All motorists need to be responsible and accountable for poor driving behaviours because they impact the safety of other road users.”- Chief Superintendent Don Bell, Commander of the OPP Highway Safety Division.

Click on the following video link to see how a seat belt saved a young
woman’s life.https://www.youtube.co/watch?v=6oyH0UexsHc.

Over the Long Weekend, the OPP will also be looking to drivers to help
them keep Ontario roads safe from other life-threatening driver
behaviours that continue to kill innocent people of all ages. These are: distracted driving, driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs, speeding and other forms of aggressive driving.

Drivers are also being reminded to respect and obey Ontario’s Move Over law when approaching a stopped emergency vehicle.  The law requires drivers to slow down, pass with caution and if the road has two or more lanes, drivers must move over into another lane if it can be done
safely.

QUICK FACTS

Every year, about 10,000 children (from infants to 12 year-olds) are
injured or killed on Canadian roads. Drivers are responsible for
ensuring that passengers under the age of 16 are properly restrained
and that the proper car seat is being used for young children and is installed correctly.

On March 18, 2014, the fine for distracted driving increased from $155
to $280. On March 17, 2014 MTO introduced Bill 173, Highway Traffic Act (Keeping Ontario’s Roads Safe) which proposes legislative amendments to further strengthen distracted driving and impaired driving laws.

  • In 2013, the OPP laid more than 290,000 speeding charges across the province.

As of April 14, 2014 the OPP has investigated 53 fatal motor vehicle collisions in which 58 people lost their lives.

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Update:

The City of Toronto's Bicycle Locking Ring Program is a leader in North America, providing over 17,000 parking spots to the public on City sidewalks and boulevards. The program is intended to provide public bicycle parking facilities at destinations that are regularly frequented by cyclists. If bikes are locked onto the ring indefinitely, it will be tagged (ticketed) and eventually removed by the City of Toronto.

The City of Toronto’s Bicycle Locking Ring Program is a leader in North America, providing over 17,000 parking spots to the public on City sidewalks and boulevards.
The program is intended to provide public bicycle parking facilities at destinations that are regularly frequented by cyclists. Post and Rings are designed for short term parking of a bike.
If bikes are locked onto the ring indefinitely, it will be tagged (ticketed) and eventually removed by the City of Toronto within one week; if the bike is derelict it will be removed forthwith.

see source

Bikes that have spent the winter parked on sidewalks will be tagged and removed over the next few weeks in the city’s yearly spring bike blitz.

The city says it needs more parking space for bikes, and that abandoned bikes take up a lot of that space.

Mayor Rob Ford says removing abandoned bikes “will help to improve the look of our neighbourhoods.” Coun. Denzil Minnan-Wong, who also chairs the Public Works and Infrastructure committee, agreed, calling the derelict bikes “an eyesore.”

Not all bikes are safely secured to post-and-rings and sometimes bike locks are cut-off and bikes are removed. Cyclists should be aware that rusty and damaged bicycles which have been left on bicycle locking ring stands may be tagged for removal. Once a bicycle has been tagged, its owner has 7 days to remove it. Solid Waste will remove the bikes and locks permanently in order to clear the public right-of-way and maintain availability of short-term bicycle parking. Bikes which are obviously derelict - stripped of parts or damaged beyond use - may be removed and discarded without notice. The City does not guarantee the return of any bicycle which has been removed from a bicycle locking ring stand. To report an abandoned bike, please call 311 or email 311@toronto.ca.

Not all bikes are safely secured to post-and-rings and sometimes bike locks are cut-off and bikes are removed.
Cyclists should be aware that rusty and damaged bicycles which have been left on bicycle locking ring stands may be tagged for removal. Once a bicycle has been tagged, its owner has seven (7) days to remove it. Solid Waste will remove the bikes and locks permanently in order to clear the public right-of-way and maintain availability of short-term bicycle parking.
Bikes which are obviously derelict – stripped of parts or damaged beyond use – may be removed and discarded without notice.
The City does not guarantee the return of any bicycle which has been removed from a bicycle locking ring stand. To report an abandoned bike, please call 311 or email 311@toronto.ca.

The city removes abandoned bikes over the course of the year. It got an early start this year, as dozens of bikes were slapped with a notice of removal along areas where leftover bikes have been an historic issue, according to the city.

The City will not waste time in taking away derelict bikes (or what is left from the bike once it has been cannalbilized) that have been attached to post-and-ring, see the above picture.  The post-and-ring bike racks are safe, as long as you lock the frame and at least one wheel to the rack.

The City will not waste time in taking away derelict bikes (or what is left from the bike once it has been cannalbilized) that have been attached to post-and-ring, see the above picture. The post-and-ring bike racks are safe, as long as you lock the frame and at least one wheel to the rack.

A total of 813 derelict bikes were removed last year.

To help the process, the city is asking residents and business to call 311 with information about abandoned bikes, including the colour of the bike frame, the type of bike and the location.

Usually an abandoned bicycle has missing or damaged parts, flat or missing tires, and is in unusable condition. If the bike has been locked to the same location for more than a month, it is likely abandoned and should be removed, says the city.

Bikes that are clearly derelict — rusted over, for instance — will be removed immediately. The city places notices on the bikes for which it is not clear if they are abandoned. After two weeks, the tagged bikes will be removed if they remain parked in the same spot.

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Update:

Gas prices in Canada are on the rise and will continue to go up as demand grows and the price of crude oil rises, according to industry watchers. (Canadian Press)

Gas prices in Canada are on the rise and will continue to go up as demand grows and the price of crude oil rises, according to industry watchers. (Canadian Press)

see source

Gasoline prices in Canada are climbing to two-year highs, and could be going higher, according to industry watchers.

In Toronto, gas prices are at 137.9 cents a litre, the highest they’ve been in two years, according to TommorowsGasPriceToday.com. At the beginning of the year, gas was 10 cents a litre cheaper.

In Vancouver, a fill-up  costs 149.1 cents a litre, 20 cents more than at the beginning of the year.

Obama meets Harper. Harper refuses to take any measures to protect Canadian motorists from the ever increasing price of fuel at the pumps.

Obama meets Harper. Canadians are very reliant on what the price of gasoline is in the U.S.; making Canadians vulnerable without any government protection.  Harper refuses to take any measures to protect Canadian motorists from the ever-increasing price of fuel at the pumps.

Doug Porter, chief economist at the Bank of Montreal, says the rising price of crude oil is part of the reason gas prices are going up.

So far this year, the price of a barrel of oil has risen more than five per cent, “and then when you tack on another three per cent drop in the Canadian dollar this year, it leaves oil prices up more than eight per cent in 2014,” Porter said in an email to CBC News.

Crude oil is the most significant component of gasoline prices. According to a report by industry group M.J. Ervin & Associates, crude oil made up 53 per cent of the cost of gas in March.

Gas prices across Canada

  • Vancouver: 149.1 cents/l
  • Calgary: 124.9 cents/l
  • Winnipeg: 129.9 cents/l
  • Toronto: 137.9 cents/l
  • Ottawa: 136.7 cents/l
  • Montreal: 142.4 cents/l
  • Halifax: 138.7 cents/l

Source: TomorrowsGasPricesToday.com

Porter added gasoline prices tend to be seasonal, and as prime driving season starts up, prices will continue to rise. Porter says gas prices could stay strong until the second half of the year if the global economy keeps improving.

Boosting profit margins

Dan McTeague, a former Liberal MP and founder of price-tracking and forecasting website TomorrowsGasPriceToday.com, says some of the bigger corporate-run stations in Toronto have increased their profit margins.

According to McTeague, those margins have increased to eight cents per litre, up from 6.5 cents per litre 10 months ago.

According to M.J. Ervin, those margins are the smallest component of gasoline prices, at about 7.7 cents per litre in March.

Another major component is taxation, which varies from province to province. Some municipalities, including Vancouver and Montreal, impose their own gas taxes.

McTeague also says part of the increase, particularly for crude oil and wholesale prices, is being driven by speculators in the U.S.

‘For a nation that claims it is an energy superpower, it’s a strange way of showing it, particularly with high prices’- Dan McTeague, founder, TomorrowsGasPriceToday.com

“There’s a perception that the U.S. economy is getting back on track,” McTeague said.

As a result, speculators are betting prices will rise, figuring that if more Americans are working, “there will be enough demand to justify the higher price.”

Too reliant on the U.S.

Canadians are very reliant on what the price of gasoline is in the U.S. This problem is particularly bad in eastern Canada, as we don’t have enough domestic supply to cover demand, McTeague says.

Most Canadian oil, particularly from the oilsands, is shipped to the U.S. to be refined. It’s then re-imported at a higher price for use by consumers. Even the refineries in New Brunswick ship nearly 80 per cent of their oil to the U.S.

McTeague is also concerned about how much Canadians are paying for energy — and that includes gasoline for their cars and natural gas to heat their homes.

Nearly 25 per cent of our disposable income goes to energy, according to McTeague.

“For a nation that claims it is an energy superpower, it’s a strange way of showing it, particularly with high prices.”

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